2016 Triumph Scrambler - Triumph Forum: Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums
Water Cooled Twins Talk Discussion of water cooled Triumph Twin related matters and topics.

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post #1 of 17 (permalink) Old 10-09-2019, 04:31 PM Thread Starter
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2016 Triumph Scrambler

Hi,

I just bought a 2016 Triumph Scrambler. It has 22,000 miles. I have a couple questions.

1) What bothers me most is the exhaust heat. Mainly, my upper right thigh gets hot, I feel it even at slower speeds - not just when stationary. The heat dissipates through the area between the heat shields and the frame where there is a gap without heat shields so it goes straight up. I was wondering what I can do to resolve this? Do you think it is running lean? Or maybe it is the air injection system people mention on forums? Maybe it needs new spark plugs?

2) Also, I am worried about what I think is a valve clicking noise. It sounds a bit metallic but isn't too loud. Do you think it needs valve adjustment? Could the engine have been damaged by riding without valve adjustment for a while by the previous owner?

3) On cold starts, I usually have to pull out the "fake electronic choke" to increase the revs. Otherwise it dies. I just need to increase the revs for 5 seconds and then it is fine. Do you know what needs to be adjusted?

Thanks! I appreciate any help.
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post #2 of 17 (permalink) Old 10-10-2019, 02:58 AM
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2016 Triumph Scrambler

Quote:
Originally Posted by hinuku View Post
Hi,



I just bought a 2016 Triumph Scrambler. It has 22,000 miles. I have a couple questions.



1) What bothers me most is the exhaust heat. Mainly, my upper right thigh gets hot, I feel it even at slower speeds - not just when stationary. The heat dissipates through the area between the heat shields and the frame where there is a gap without heat shields so it goes straight up. I was wondering what I can do to resolve this? Do you think it is running lean? Or maybe it is the air injection system people mention on forums? Maybe it needs new spark plugs?



2) Also, I am worried about what I think is a valve clicking noise. It sounds a bit metallic but isn't too loud. Do you think it needs valve adjustment? Could the engine have been damaged by riding without valve adjustment for a while by the previous owner?



3) On cold starts, I usually have to pull out the "fake electronic choke" to increase the revs. Otherwise it dies. I just need to increase the revs for 5 seconds and then it is fine. Do you know what needs to be adjusted?



Thanks! I appreciate any help.
Edit: I replied based on my experience with the 900cc water cooled. Your bike may be the air cooled version.(2016 had a mid-year introduction of the new water cooled bikes).

1) do a decat and it will run cooler. The cat is under the first the cover on the exhaust just after coming out of the engine. Do a search for, ďMeerkat Street ScramblerĒ for detailed info.

2) check to see if the previous owner did the 20k service - it includes adjusting valve clearances. These motors are fairly loud(mechanically) upon startup. If it goes away after warmup then thereís probably no need to worry.

3) as above, the 20k service also includes spark plug replacement, fuel filter replacement, and air filter replacement. This may be the cure to the hard starting. Old gas in the tank can also be a culprit. Consider replacing the stock air filter with a free flowing DNA reusable filter...K&N is also a good choice but I found the DNA a tighter fit on my application.


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Last edited by LA-Liquid-T100; 10-10-2019 at 07:27 AM.
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post #3 of 17 (permalink) Old 10-10-2019, 06:19 AM
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My Scrambler is a previous model (2006, last of the carburettor engines), but there will be lots of mechanical similarities with your bike.

Heat from the exhaust is something one has to put up with, it is the price of looking a bit like Steve McQueen. If your bike has the AIS fitted then removing it is an easy job and it does seem to make things run a bit cooler. I donít know anything about catalysts, but what the other contributor says sounds very sensible, as long as you donít have emissions checks where you live.

The bikes are a bit noisy (mechanically), so I doubt that you have anything to worry about. If you have the service history for the bike then the valve clearance check and spark plug change should be recorded, if you donít it would be a good idea to do both jobs now. The valve clearance check is a pretty easy job that you can do yourself, if it is outside tolerance then the adjustment bit is rather more involved, but if you are not confident yourself you could probably get a mobile mechanic to do it for you.

Changing the plugs is a cheap and easy job that you could do yourself.

Good fortune,

Alan




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post #4 of 17 (permalink) Old 10-10-2019, 01:45 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks a lot. It looks like mine has a mini radiator in the front so it should be the water cooled one.

To be honest, all I'm worried about is potential health issues related to a hot exhaust up my thigh.

As I mentioned - my calf is fine. It is actually the heat coming up toward the seat that bothers me most. Also, the exhaust has black "oxidation?" on it. Which makes me wonder if it's actually what used to be "bluing" of the exhaust due to excess heat. It backfires quite a lot so maybe it does burn lots of fuel in the pipe. Do you know if wrapping it with heat tape would be a good idea? I'm worried it might lead to an overheated engine for example. I don't have my own place so I have very limited tools at the moment.
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post #5 of 17 (permalink) Old 10-10-2019, 01:48 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
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My Scrambler is a previous model (2006, last of the carburettor engines), but there will be lots of mechanical similarities with your bike.

Heat from the exhaust is something one has to put up with, it is the price of looking a bit like Steve McQueen. If your bike has the AIS fitted then removing it is an easy job and it does seem to make things run a bit cooler. I donít know anything about catalysts, but what the other contributor says sounds very sensible, as long as you donít have emissions checks where you live.

The bikes are a bit noisy (mechanically), so I doubt that you have anything to worry about. If you have the service history for the bike then the valve clearance check and spark plug change should be recorded, if you donít it would be a good idea to do both jobs now. The valve clearance check is a pretty easy job that you can do yourself, if it is outside tolerance then the adjustment bit is rather more involved, but if you are not confident yourself you could probably get a mobile mechanic to do it for you.

Changing the plugs is a cheap and easy job that you could do yourself.

Good fortune,

Alan




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Thanks a lot Alan! Do you also feel heat at your thigh mostly? When I look through forums people only complain of calf heat. So maybe if my thigh is the complaint then the engine is actually running hot?

Also, is it normal to have a bit of a throttle lag on these bikes? A little shove/jolt (almost as if the chain was loose)when releasing and adding throttle quickly.
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post #6 of 17 (permalink) Old 10-10-2019, 02:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hinuku View Post
Thanks a lot Alan! Do you also feel heat at your thigh mostly? When I look through forums people only complain of calf heat. So maybe if my thigh is the complaint then the engine is actually running hot?



Also, is it normal to have a bit of a throttle lag on these bikes? A little shove/jolt (almost as if the chain was loose)when releasing and adding throttle quickly.


Here in the UK it doesnít get very hot, so a bit of warmth is often quite welcome, having a warm right calf (and thigh) in the winter is a good thing. Iím not sure your bike is anything to worry about - if you still have the air injection system fitted it would be a good idea to remove it, that certainly makes the exhaust run cooler. I removed the AIS from my bike recently (it had taken me 13 years to get round to doing so), it is an easy job with no demerits.

Mine in a carburettor bike, but it certainly lacks a little smoothness in going from low to medium engine speed. Balancing the carburettors has helped, but I think it is mostly a manifestation of the 270 degree crank.

It doesnít sound like there is much wrong with your bike, but Iíd suggest you give it a major service (do it yourself) for peace of mind. These bikes are pretty easy to work on and very tough.

Good fortune,

Alan


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post #7 of 17 (permalink) Old 10-10-2019, 04:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hinuku View Post
Thanks a lot. It looks like mine has a mini radiator in the front so it should be the water cooled one.



To be honest, all I'm worried about is potential health issues related to a hot exhaust up my thigh.



As I mentioned - my calf is fine. It is actually the heat coming up toward the seat that bothers me most. Also, the exhaust has black "oxidation?" on it. Which makes me wonder if it's actually what used to be "bluing" of the exhaust due to excess heat. It backfires quite a lot so maybe it does burn lots of fuel in the pipe. Do you know if wrapping it with heat tape would be a good idea? I'm worried it might lead to an overheated engine for example. I don't have my own place so I have very limited tools at the moment.

Upload a couple of pictures of the bike including the exhaust.

The additional heat is probably not going to cause any health issues(More riding and less stopping will cure that problem).

Wrapping can help with the heat but it will eventually take its toll on your pipes.

The noticeable backfiring and black oxidation may be a sign that the bike has already had the cat removed.

Buy the Haynes manual for the water cooled bikes(if thatís what you have):

Triumph Bonneville T100, T120, Bobber, Thruxton, Street Twin, Cup & Scrambler (2016 - 2017) Haynes Repair Manual (Haynes Powersport) https://www.amazon.com/dp/1785214012..._lo5NDbA3ANJ83



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post #8 of 17 (permalink) Old 10-11-2019, 04:19 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
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Upload a couple of pictures of the bike including the exhaust.

The additional heat is probably not going to cause any health issues(More riding and less stopping will cure that problem).

Wrapping can help with the heat but it will eventually take its toll on your pipes.

The noticeable backfiring and black oxidation may be a sign that the bike has already had the cat removed.

Buy the Haynes manual for the water cooled bikes(if thatís what you have):

Triumph Bonneville T100, T120, Bobber, Thruxton, Street Twin, Cup & Scrambler (2016 - 2017) Haynes Repair Manual (Haynes Powersport) https://www.amazon.com/dp/1785214012..._lo5NDbA3ANJ83



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Thanks again! I took some pictures. Let me know if any other pictures would be of help.

Thank you
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post #9 of 17 (permalink) Old 10-11-2019, 06:27 AM
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A little popping on the overrun is normal, but those headers don't look normal at all. If I had to guess (and that's all it would be) I'd say someone wrapped the headers and has then taken it off. I'm sure someone more knowledgable will chime in. Heat-wise, it is what it is. I very rarely noticed it on my 2006, but I really notice it on the 1200XE. You could always consider swapping the exhaust out for something like a Zard low level 2-1 (other makes are available ) Using the 'choke' for cold starting is normal - it's what it's for. If I were you, I'd get myself a Haynes and just run through a quick service. These bikes are really easy to work on
Cheers
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post #10 of 17 (permalink) Old 10-11-2019, 06:41 AM
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2016 Triumph Scrambler

You do still have the AIS fitted, it is really easy to get rid of with a little kit like this:

https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?m...2F263687508908

I suspect there will be others on the market that do the same thing. That will reduce popping on the over run and make the exhaust run cooler.

I agree with the above, it looks like the PO has wrapped the headers, then stripped the wrapping off but left all that black residue. I think it should clean up fine if you can find a solvent, try a few such as acetone, water based degreaser, ammonia and so on until you find one that works. I think you should be able to clean up the headers so they look smart again. When you get back to the metal you will find they have turned a bit blue, that is a Triumph thing, sort of a badge of pride. Getting rid of the AIS will help, but blue header pipes wonít do any harm. The headers usually turn this colour:



Iíd agree with a couple of the other contributors above: get yourself a workshop manual (either the Haynes one or a Triumph one on a CD) and carry out a service yourself. That way you not only know everything has been done, but you get to know the machine and you will spot things before they fail.

You have found a nice looking bike - congratulations.

Alan

PS. Air cooled bike, the radiator is for the oil.



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Last edited by Othen; 10-11-2019 at 06:52 AM.
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