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any thoughts on the motorcycle school offered in fremont, ca or daytona, fl for euro bikes bmw, ducati and triumph?
 

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I graduated from Wyotech (Daytona, FL campus) a couple months ago. There are good things and bad. Don't really know anything about the one in CA, should be a similar curriculum I'd imagine. The Euro program is pretty good here in Daytona, but its much more focused on Ducati and BMW (I'm a Ducati guy first and foremost so that was fine with me). The good thing imo about the Euro class in Daytona is that BMW and Ducati do their factory classes here at Wyotech so we have some of the top Ducati and BMW gurus hanging around lending a hand fairly often. We got to check out the first Duc 1198S in the country that the factory class is using for their update classes and just after I left I believe they built up a Rocket III for a horsepower shootout during bike week (I helped take the engine apart so we could get some trick bits made for it but graduated before the new parts came in).

The BMW program is the biggest part of that specialty since you have to be just shy of a software engineer to work on them. Actually half of the Euro program is BMW (6 weeks)and most of the program is done on a computer (all of BMWs tests/instruction is done online). The Ducati and triumph programs are much less structured. They are each supposed to be 3 weeks long but Triumph doesn't really give us enough to cover in their program and Ducati has more than we could cover in 3 weeks so it worked out to be about 2 1/2 weeks for Triumph and 3 1/2 weeks for Ducati. Triumph doesn't like talking about older bikes for some reason, they want you working only one new-ish models in that class. Nearly half of the Triumph certification test is just about motorcycle batteries. We did have a good selection of bikes in Triumph, 2 different gen Tigers, a new 675, a new Sprint ST, a few bonnevilles, etc. Ducati didn't give us any new model bikes until the week before my class graduated and we were in BMW but they do have some now (again, I have no idea on the CA campus). We did have ALL special tools, plenty of engines on stands to work on, all the manuals, plenty of workspace and a very small class. BMW supports the class a lot more so we had a LOT of BMWs new and old and of course all the necessary tools and quite a few good engines to work on (BMW is okay with us splitting engine cases, something Triumph and Ducati don't generally "like" for the level 1 classes).

You do get Triumph, Ducati and BMW level 1 certifications. Triumph and Ducati have a test at the end of each course (the Ducati test we took was actually level 2 equivalent even though we only got level 1 certs). BMW has a couple dozen individual tests all along the way and you have a lot of hands on tasks that have to be completed. The only problem with the BMW cert is that if you don't work for a BMW dealership within 6 months all your certs disappear which means you'd have to take the factory class and do it all over again to get them back. Personally, I'll be glad if I never touch a BMW motorcycle again, talk about radically over engineered!!!


The 6 month core program can be very frustrating at times, especially when the school decides to scrap the small classes promise they made when I first signed up (again this is just the 6 month core program, the Euro class is usually a really small class with plenty of bikes, tools, and lifts). The common theme at most wyotech campuses is too many students/not enough instructors and sometimes not enough tools/bikes to work on. The Daytona Beach campus has always been heavily focused on Harley's (even though the Asian specialty has the most students by quite a bit). They're getting away from that as time goes on but most of the core program instructors are old harley guys. Corinthian colleges that now owns wyotech decided to make the curriculum "standard" so the core program uses crappy powerpoint slides for all the lectures that were all made by car people so while there is some good info there is also a lot of blatantly wrong and irrelevant stuff. The textbook we used for the core program was also printed in the early 80s so its massively out of date and a lot of the tests are screwed up.
That said, if you give a crap and actually make an attempt to learn something, the instructors are knowledgeable and you can certainly get your money/time's worth out of the school. All of the crap you put up with in the core program goes out the window when you get to the specialty. I actually had a blast for those last 3 months and learned a LOT.

If your wanting to work as a mechanic, keep in mind Wyotech does NOT always impress people. A lot of the guys that go to wyotech are just there to kill time, smoke weed, and play with motorcycles. Unfortunately for those of thus that put effort into it, some of those idiots still get jobs working on actual motorcycles which means there are dealerships out there that may never hire a wyotech graduate again. Wyotech inflates the numbers on how many students got hired. They tell you its a piece of cake to find everyone a job but I know of a lot of people that graduated with me that still don't have jobs (heck I don't start my new job for another week and I graduated in January). There are jobs but you have to work at it and I found Wyotech's career services department to be more harmful than helpful.

sorry, that was a lot longer than I intended it to be
 

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one more thing, the Euro program is a very top-heavy curriculum. What I mean by that is you don't do any tire changes, oil changes, chain adjustments, PDI, etc. I haven't changed a tire in 6 months so I know I'm probably going to be slower at it than I used to be. That said, I can do a Ducati belt change and valve adjustment or rebuild a BMW engine with the best of 'em.

I would suggest if you decide to go to Wyotech ESPECIALLY if you do it in Florida, take the Asian course in addition to the Euro. They don't really learn much more than you do in the core program but they get an ungodly amount of practice doing tire changes, services, frame replacements, rebuilding forks/shocks, and engines. The instructor for that class in Daytona is really detail oriented, if you do a frame replacement and every wire or cable isn't run exactly as it is from the factory, he'll call you on it. The Euro graduates are probably better at the diagnostics, the electronics and some of the more difficult tasks but the asian students are extremely good at the more common procedures.
 

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Woody,

That was a great post. Nice of you to offer such detailed and first hand information about the program. I joined the forum just to tell you that. Your post deserves some recognition.

Good luck at your new job.
 
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