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Hey everyone, I would really like to purchase a new Triumph Speed Triple after the first of the year (1/2021). The main sticking point is that I live in Western Colorado and the nearest dealer is in Denver, Colorado, on the other side of the Rockies. Google maps indicates a 4 hour, 36 minute drive (good weather, of course) at a distance of 267 miles. Initial concerns are: If the bike needs warranty service (which is part of what you're paying for in a new bike) I'm in for a bit of a drive or a wait, depending on the time of year. I'm also not sure how stringent Triumph's rules are under the warranty (can I change my own oil/filter, for example). I'm 64 yo and have worked on all my own bikes since age 12, so with a used bike I don't worry about such matters. But as a possible last bike, I'd like to have one of the new Speed Triples. From reading online and watching Youtube videos (ad nauseum) it appears the Triumph is very reliable. Of course, there's always that one in a thousand that mucks up the whole mess.

If any of you have relevant experience with the 2018 and newer Speed Triples, I'd love to hear your story in relation to these concerns. The BMW S1000R is on my short list and there's no way I'd buy a BMW without a reputable dealer nearby (I currently ride a Beemer). There is just something about the Speed Triple that ticks all the boxes for me. I'm willing to drive over the mountains once in a while, say every year or two, but I definitely don't want the Service Department at a dealership on the Front Range to know me on a first name basis, nor do I want them on speed dial. Thank you for your patience and any personal views you might have.
 

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If you really have your heart set on a Triumph, and who wouldn't, consider an alternative for non warranty work. You may have a qualified mechanic who knows Triumphs near by. The 500 mi service would be tricky. If you road he home you would be more than half way to your first service. After that it's 10000 miles between trips. if it were me I'd do it and work something out.
 

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Thanks for the reply. I have considered driving over in my truck, picking up the bike, staying outside of town for three days or so and riding quite a bit to get to 500 miles. Then ride or cart it over to the dealer for a prearranged service, and drive home after. Reading it, it seems a bit complicated, but it's one time when new. I really don't want to settle for a #2 or #3 pick on my list because of dealer accessibility.
 

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Hey everyone, I would really like to purchase a new Triumph Speed Triple after the first of the year (1/2021). The main sticking point is that I live in Western Colorado and the nearest dealer is in Denver, Colorado, on the other side of the Rockies. Google maps indicates a 4 hour, 36 minute drive (good weather, of course) at a distance of 267 miles. Initial concerns are: If the bike needs warranty service (which is part of what you're paying for in a new bike) I'm in for a bit of a drive or a wait, depending on the time of year. I'm also not sure how stringent Triumph's rules are under the warranty (can I change my own oil/filter, for example). I'm 64 yo and have worked on all my own bikes since age 12, so with a used bike I don't worry about such matters. But as a possible last bike, I'd like to have one of the new Speed Triples. From reading online and watching Youtube videos (ad nauseum) it appears the Triumph is very reliable. Of course, there's always that one in a thousand that mucks up the whole mess.

If any of you have relevant experience with the 2018 and newer Speed Triples, I'd love to hear your story in relation to these concerns. The BMW S1000R is on my short list and there's no way I'd buy a BMW without a reputable dealer nearby (I currently ride a Beemer). There is just something about the Speed Triple that ticks all the boxes for me. I'm willing to drive over the mountains once in a while, say every year or two, but I definitely don't want the Service Department at a dealership on the Front Range to know me on a first name basis, nor do I want them on speed dial. Thank you for your patience and any personal views you might have.
We choose where we live and along with that choice come compromises.

That said, many have gone farther for a brand of car, truck , tractor, or motorcycle they couldn't get locally or couldn't get the treatment or price they wanted from a local dealer.

Go get the bike. Put miles on and close to the 500 mile service make an appointment, ride it over, and wait for it.
Great excuse for a run over the passes.

If warranty repairs are needed and the bike can't be ridden there always a U-Haul trailer.
 

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I owned an older model Speed Triple for around 12 years and honestly never had work needed under warranty. Based on my experience and others, I wouldn't choose not to get a bike because a dealer isn't next door. However, every bike is different, you could experience problems, and four hours is a long ass way.
But, my biggest issue would be just the whole problem with getting parts. Unless things have changed in the last six months, parts are rarely in stock and it takes over a week to get parts. So, if you need something for the weekend ride, you're usually out of luck. I do most of my own work and that really got old having to wait so long for typically needed parts.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Good point, Night Train. For a while, I'd probably keep the BMW touring bike I currently ride as backup. As you have testified, most owners claim few problems once we get away from the older bikes with stator issues and such. I really think I'm just going to go for it and deal with what I need to. I have to wait until after the first of the year, then just do it. Thanks for the info.
 

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Risk management, buy the bike and work it out, if the bike is a lemon you'll know soon enough, and so will we!
There must be a number of motels near the dealer.
 

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You may be able to find a lightly used one with the 500 mile service already done. I drove several hours for a 2019 with 1100 miles on it and got it for $13K out the door. Quite a savings, the initial service is done and it is broken in but otherwise brand new.
 

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The other option would be to have the dealer do the dyno break-in. I personally trust the method however being cheap and having local dealers never actually used the service. You could start the process over the phone, get a ride there and leave with a brand new bike, rings properly sealed and no worries til the valve ck.
 

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Or...ask the dealer.

Explain the concern and ask them what their policy is (and ask them to confirm by email).

Perhaps even ask if they'll collect the bike if it requires warranty work
 

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I may be alone here, but who goes to the dealer to do the 500 mile service? Buy the oil, filter, washer and a torque wrench and do it at home. My only concern would be serious warranty work especially on the new new models with the full color TFT screens.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I may be alone here, but who goes to the dealer to do the 500 mile service? Buy the oil, filter, washer and a torque wrench and do it at home. My only concern would be serious warranty work especially on the new new models with the full color TFT screens.
If taking it to the dealer for these services is not required to keep the warranty in force, I'll do the work myself. I really need to call a dealer and ask some questions. I guess I haven't because I'm still six months out from purchase. I'm also not against buying one used with low miles. I noticed a 2019 RS with 1300 miles on it and a few grand off the MSRP.
 

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True but my last 2 bikes did need a software update at 600 so I did my own oil and the price was less. A lot of these new bikes need software a the first checkup, but maybe you can even do that yourself
 

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True but my last 2 bikes did need a software update at 600 so I did my own oil and the price was less. A lot of these new bikes need software a the first checkup, but maybe you can even do that yourself
You can reset the service reminders with an android device and an OBD scanner.
 

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You can reset the service reminders with an android device and an OBD scanner.
Not sure if it's the case with the Triumphs, but some bikes now have different settings (for want of a better term) for running in which are changed at the first service (rev limits, throttle response etc)
 

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Not sure if it's the case with the Triumphs, but some bikes now have different settings (for want of a better term) for running in which are changed at the first service (rev limits, throttle response etc)
You can reset the service reminder yourself.
You're right that some bikes such as the new BMW S1000RR I think need to be "unlocked" at the first service to raise the rev limit from the running in setting to its normal level, never heard of that in relation to any Triumphs though.
For most bikes the 500 mile service is just an oil and filter change and a quick visual check, so unless you desperately need your oil filter overtightened and spray grease everywhere making a mess of your bike do it at home. :p
 
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