Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner

1 - 20 of 49 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just looking for winter storage tips for my fuel injected Thruxton. Winter is cold here.

I plan to:

Clean the bike very well and dry well.
Remove the battery and store indoors.
Lube the chain well.
Fill the tank to max, add fuel stabilizer, and ride it a bit to get it through the fuel system.
Cover the exhaust outlet.
Cover the bike.
Park on rubber mat in garage.

Am I missing anything? I changed the oil in April. My first 500 mile service. Should I change it before storage or in the spring? Or both?

Any tips or suggestions greatly appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
308 Posts
Do you have the airbox removed? If not plug it up with metal wool, like the stuff to scrub metal pans, then cover it with tape or something so rats dont get in there, they will not touch metal wool. Also I put dryer sheets under my seat in the battery tray and by the wires to stop any rodents from building a nest in there. I also sprayed mine down with Amsoil MP just like wd-40 it displaces water to stop it from rusting, some spray it in the exhaust, I didnt because in the spring im getting a new exhaust anyway. also put a note on your seat or under your seat that says what you did, so when you get it out in the spring you see what you did and remember to remove any plugs or anything before you fire it up.

Sent from my SCH-I510 using Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
308 Posts
Do you have the airbox removed? If not plug it up with metal wool, like the stuff to scrub metal pans, then cover it with tape or something so rats dont get in there, they will not touch metal wool.

Sent from my SCH-I510 using Motorcycle.com Free App
Plug the snorkel that is, not the whole thing

Sent from my SCH-I510 using Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,670 Posts
Change the oil before storage, after the ride to get the fuel stabilizer all through the system.

Cheers,
-Kit
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,144 Posts
I wash and wax/ anti corrosion spray bare aluminum parts, change the oil, put the bike up on stands, and put Marine Stabil in a full tank. Then I run it for a few minutes to circulate. Then plug intakes to deter the damn mice. Then I hook up the BT, and set traps with tasty peanut butter, to kill as many rodents as I can until spring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
572 Posts
Oil change before storage. The oil is good to go next Spring. Don't leave old oil in an unused bike, because the acid contaminants drop out of suspension, migrate into tight spaces like the bearing journals (by osmosis) and can start to etch the surfaces slightly. The effects are cumulative over several Winters. Starting the motor during storage dumps a high level of contaminants into the oil from the cold start which are not burnt off if the bike isn't ridden far enough to bring and hold the oil at full working temperature. That's about a 10 - 15 mile ride.

Battery needs a short trickle charge once a month to maximise battery life.

As an alternative to using a fuel stabilisor the fuel system can be run dry. If you do this and also leave the tank empty, remove the tank and swirl a tablespoon of oil around it so that the internal surfaces are coated and rust proofed.

Tyres should not be in contact with a concrete surface. If nothing else, a bit of old carpet for the bike to stand on does the job. Wax and polish the paintwork before covering. This also works for chrome and polished alloy (which is usually laquered, so treat it as a painted surface)and saves the hassle of having to clean off Vaseline, WD40, ACF50 or whatever. Put a few drops of lubricating oil on all the moving parts - gear linkage, levers, footpegs, etc.

Rob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
Check and double check on the techniques referenced above: oil change, closing mouse-ready orifices, storing the battery indoors, blocking the bike up on the center stand so that both tires are off the floor. The wash/wax'n'lube idea is probably a good one, too: if it's too cold to ride now, there is possibly some salt on the roads already. As for the fuel stabilizer, I used to do a combination technique: add it to the tank, ride around a bit (to warm up the oil and get the treated fuel into the carbs), turn off the petcocks and run the carbs dry, top off the tank and call it good.

This worked well for me during my three winters in Maine. I now use a much better winterizing technique: I moved to California and pretty much ride year-round. Stabil? What's that?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
419 Posts
I wouldn't be putting metal wool anywhere near my intake while it will keep the rodents away it is prone to leaving behind stray strands of the metal fibers. I don't want those anywhere near my air filter / intake
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
ride on the days that there is not snow on the roads. forget the storage. At least once a month.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
someone mentioned Marine Stabil. I don't remember why, but the guy who owns my garage also told me to use that and not regular Stabil.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
I'd understood that using fuel stabilizer is good for carburetors, but NOT for fuel injectors. Truthfully, I top of the tanks, maintain charged batteries, and I never seem to have problems with start-up's come spring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
ride on the days that there is not snow on the roads. forget the storage. At least once a month.
O how I can agree with this approach. Used to store my bikes in winter for years. Even had a second cheap bike to ride during winter for some winters. However, for some years now I keep my bike stand by for a nice, snowfree, dry wintersday. It is lovely to drive in those conditions and it would be a waste not to enjoy your bike.
I use a spray to cover al parts except brake parts. It's called Cockpit spray, and intended to get a shiny car interor! It leaves a thin layer on the sprayed surfaces which prevents the parts from getting rusty, and keep them easy to clean.

Happy riding,

Bert
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Just ride all year.

Why store it long term at all? Just take it out of your garage or uncover it, etc.. And run the engine, work the brakes, oil the chain, top off fluids etc. Just like you are riding it. At least once a week for 20 minutes. Or if the weather suits you, ride. I live in California and ride all year long rain or shine. After riding in the rain I rinse my bike off with a hose before putting it in the garage for the night. When it stops raining I wash it. People are always surprised it's a 2006 and think it's newer. I'm really not working hard at all to keep it nice. I just stay on top of it a couple of minutes a day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
I'm with bigfoot - just ride it. That's why I live in California - ride 12 months a year - at least once every month it's shirtsleeve weather. :D
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
31 Posts
Can anyone explain the logic behind not allowing tires to contact concrete in winter storage? It's obviously not about avoiding flat spots -moving onto carpet scraps would make no difference in that regard. Is there some interaction of which I'm unaware, or could this simply be based in old myth?

And I agree -forget "storage" if at all possible. As Freddie would say, "Get on your bikes and RIDE!"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
How about brake fluid changes? Brake fluid is hygroscopic and if it has absorbed moisture, it could freeze and cause damage in the brake system. Us BMW owners with ABS are especially cautious regarding DOT4 and we recommend annual changes of the stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Why store it long term at all? Just take it out of your garage or uncover it, etc.. And run the engine, work the brakes, oil the chain, top off fluids etc. Just like you are riding it. At least once a week for 20 minutes.
Not recommended. This does more potential damage due to condensation in the engine. If you are not going to ride the engine and other lubed parts to full operating temperature for an extended time, do not start and run the engine.

Rust, condensation and engine oil acids can result and defeat your storage preparations. Some folks run flooding oil into the intake to oil the engine combustion chambers...a good idea if you live in a humid climate near an ocean.

As for tires, dry concrete will have no deleterious affect on them. If your concerned, a bit of cardboard is fine. Some folks reduce tire pressure but be careful....tubeless tires can come unseated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
I'd understood that using fuel stabilizer is good for carburetors, but NOT for fuel injectors. Truthfully, I top of the tanks, maintain charged batteries, and I never seem to have problems with start-up's come spring.
Stored gasoline motor fuel does deteriorate with age. Fuel stabilizers slow this process and help maintain the fuel in good condition.

Fuel injected engines seem to fare better than carbureted engines when it comes to stored fuel. But fuel deteriorates regardless of how the engine delivers the fuel....carburetor or fuel injection.

Stabilizers used according to directions will not harm either a carbureted or fuel injected engine. These days, you'll find carburetors on very few engines other than lawn mowers and weed eaters.


Carburetors are just too costly and do not inspire engines to operate within the emissions regulations currently mandated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Can anyone explain the logic behind not allowing tires to contact concrete in winter storage? It's obviously not about avoiding flat spots -moving onto carpet scraps would make no difference in that regard. Is there some interaction of which I'm unaware, or could this simply be based in old myth?
Old myth.

Unless the concrete is wet and uncured, there is no meaningful chemical interaction between the elastomers used in tires and a dry concrete floor.

Tires are mostly carbon black, a rather inert material, along with styrene butadiene rubber and other materials that don't react with concrete otherwise, we would be in a really bad fix every time we rode on wet concrete. Make sense?
 
1 - 20 of 49 Posts
Top