Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am (a bit of a luddite) still using a mini tower with windows 7. In a few days Microsoft are ending their support of this operating system. Every now and again they send out messages that suggest (for security reasons) that I should buy a pc that runs windows 10. I have little desire to do this. Is there any reason why I shouldn't continue to run windows 7 and just buy some Macafee, Norton etc ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
I am (a bit of a luddite) still using a mini tower with windows 7. In a few days Microsoft are ending their support of this operating system. Every now and again they send out messages that suggest (for security reasons) that I should buy a pc that runs windows 10. I have little desire to do this. Is there any reason why I shouldn't continue to run windows 7 and just buy some Macafee, Norton etc ?
I wouldn't worry about it. It's only Microsoft trying to squeeze a bit more money out of you. I'm still running Windows 7 and so are most of the PC's at the firm I work for. If you keep using a good anti-virus software program then you shouldn't have any issues for years to come, I've been using the free version of Avast anti-virus for years now and it serves me very well. The only issue you will get is that eventually, and I mean in quite a few years time you'll find that search engines, anti virus providers, flash player and the like will not work on older operating systems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
pet peeve of mine (one of many). you buy a license to use software and the people you paid do not allow you to use the upgrade, making your software unusable. BTW, i still use w7 ...and xp. (some engine management software requires xp)
 

·
Driftless Admin
Joined
·
11,428 Posts
I wouldn't upgrade a home computer just because of lack-of-updates, personally. Probably wouldn't want such a computer on a corporate network. But for home use, what the heck.

McAfee/Norton protect you from viruses. That's a slightly different problem. The reason you want patches from Microsoft is that as hackers discover holes in the operating system, MS patches fix them. Any new exploits in Windows 7 discovered from here on out won't get patched.

But, will there be any? What is the risk to you personally if you are hacked anyways? What's the probability?

If I were you instead of upgraded I would:

1. Make sure you have a firewall running both on your computer on your cable modem (or whatever connects you to the internet).
2. Make sure you don't have any passwords stored on your computer that aren't encrypted (password protected). Heck, if you aren't already use LastPass or BitWarden or something to manage your passwords.

That'll keep you secure enough I'd think.


On the other hand ... Windows10 is pretty good and new computers are faster ... might be a good time to treat yourself :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,005 Posts
Some good advice above. As mentioned, store no sensitive data locally and run a strong and well-supported anti-virus cum security program, use Firefox and avoid Internet Explorer. Most malware arrives by mail, so make sure your A/V screens that.

You've got 3 - 4 years before browsers and A/V stop supporting Win7. Some programs you may use won't update a lot sooner which may bother you or not. Win7 allows you significant control over the operating system. From following AskWoody, Win10, even with Pro allows only minimal update deferrals which appears to be a biggie since M$ fired their quality control department 2 - 3 years ago and early bugs in Win10 versions can be troublesome. Also, IIRC, your whole operating system is "refreshed" every ~ 18 months or so until M$ no longer likes your hardware and no longer offers you any updates, feature or security, so in ~ 5 years you might be in the same predicament again. :sick: Also, when the O/S resets, lots goes back to M$ defaults and you have to reset your deferrals and preferences again. With Win10 M$ owns you, with lots of telemetry/traffic going outbound to their servers. UGH...

Will be staying with Win7 Pro on this workstation for a while anyway as two important programs I'm using won't run on Win10 and would need to be replaced/updated at $$$.

Everybody will have different situations, so this is far from black and white. FWIW, I'm a security/privacy freak and run a paid version of Kaspersky Internet Security which has all the controls @BonnieBlack mentioned as well as a secure browser invisible to the operating system for all financial transactions. Since there are no state secrets here, I'm OK with all my traffic going through Kaspersky servers. :) It's Kaspersky which finds most 0-day malware before M$ and others anyway and KIS updates hourly.

Nothing is perfect. Good practice is important. I'm using Firefox with Noscript which might be a little fussy for the OP, but runs only scripts I approve and I approve only those required for site functionality, (and minimal Google). Also KIS is set to mark all links which are safe on sites and search and mail.

Will eventually have to migrate and upgrade hardware and software which is a PITA. Wish the OEMS would get Red Hat to create a "real" operating system to compete with M$. They may not want those headaches! Pity... IMO M$ has lost interest in supporting individuals and home users. BTW, large enterprises can buy Win7 M$ patches for another three years. Those are all cumulative updates, not security only either. Only been using security only patches for the last two years myself.

As always, YMMV...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for your replies, folks. I'll be keeping my pc and win7. I will most likely buy some type of security software.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
I am running win7 64bit. I buy all of my computers from the DELL refurbished site and rebuild them. I'll run 7/64bit for another year the switch to win 8.1. 64bit. I ran XP for 2 years after Bill Gates abandonment. Worked fine. Nobody attacks old operating systems....no fun.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,306 Posts
There are distros that remove the challenge. Then there is Apple with Mac OS X built on BSD Unix.

I have both at home.
Yeah, I run Linux Mint on a laptop and dual boot Windows and Ubuntu on my desktop. Linux isn't as scary as it used to be, but coming into it fresh can still be a bit daunting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
I've been running Linux for years. Don't get me wrong, I'm not that computer literate but it can be fun. More recently I switched to Ubuntu just because I didn't have time to shop all the different distributions. If you don't want to play Microsoft games and just use your computer for web and e-mail I highly recommend it (Ubuntu or Mint)! Microsoft has enough money and most of it's "giving" just set it up to make more. Sorry for the last part, that's why I switched to Linux.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,980 Posts
On the other hand ... Windows10 is pretty good and new computers are faster ... might be a good time to treat yourself :)
Well I've been running W10 for about 2 years and compared to W7 its just a bloatware Micro$oft s--tfest that phones home on a regular basis and leaks all manner of info about you with its 'apps'. What's more it does all that at your expense, using your bandwidth. My version is stripped of all the bundled apps, the nosey, curtain twitcher known as Cortana is disabled, OneDrive disabled and the privacy/security settings tightened up until they squeak. You would be surprised at how much faster the machine boots up.

There are a couple of programs you can run which do the same, such as Spybot Anti Beacon or Shut Up 10, but they block the apps rather than removing them completely, so I did that using PowerShell. I have my own 'apps' - all 3rd party software I run on W10 is open source.

Personally I'm a fan of dual booting, I have Linux Mint on another drive and use that for any secure stuff, so when I switch on the PC I can choose which drive to boot from.

Its a bit hypocritical of Micro$oft to release security patches when their own software circumvents them. For example, you can't block Bing in the hosts file.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,306 Posts
In fairness to Microsoft, they're not doing anything that Apple hasn't been doing for years, and even then to nowhere near the extent. Seems Apple folk just accept it as part of paying a premium for Apple stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,342 Posts
In fairness to Microsoft, they're not doing anything that Apple hasn't been doing for years, and even then to nowhere near the extent. Seems Apple folk just accept it as part of paying a premium for Apple stuff.
Apple OS X gives you the option of turning that stuff off. OS X (also with BSD underpinnings) is a lot faster than windows bloatware.

I run both Apple OS X and Arch Linux. With Arch, you load only the components you want. There is little hand holding with the install, though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,980 Posts
In fairness to Microsoft, they're not doing anything that Apple hasn't been doing for years, and even then to nowhere near the extent. Seems Apple folk just accept it as part of paying a premium for Apple stuff.
IMHO they are both as bad as each other but Linux is the only other real choice, and even that is still not supported enough to be a real competitor. What I mean by that is, there are some pieces of software for example that I use which either do not exist on LInux, or exist but with very limited functionality compared to a Windows version. This means to me that I have to dual boot if I don't like Windows. Linux is by far the most secure and reliable system but there is a lack of people programming for it.

I may have managed to remove all those apps on W10 but I still had to block 115 telemetry hosts. Is that fair?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,306 Posts
No it's fair - I've run Spy<bot anti-beacon for yonks. I just don't see why I should be feeding them all my info. At the minute I'm running NMap to see what traffic goes where and try to suss out what unwelcome and uninvited traffic I should block.
 

·
Driftless Admin
Joined
·
11,428 Posts
Have you checked out wireshark @bobbo? nmap just maps ports, wireshark will allow you to monitor traffic.

Ironically enough, the only thing I've installed from the Windows Store is Ubuntu. Win10 has a WSL system that allows you to run Linux within windows. It's more aimed at developers; you can run apache/mysql/etc natively right next to your favorite windows tools. Really just command-line stuff, but the Linux guys who are stuck using Win10 for some things might enjoy trying it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
290 Posts
As pointed out - with W10 you can install various flavours of linux from the store as a subsystem, and they are supported using the new terminal app - which also integrates with all that cloud stuff.

on top of that, W10 professional also comes with hyper-v built in which allows one to run dedicated linux VMs if desired.

in terms of comparing operating systems in terms of performance, spaced used and all that stuff - there is no difference.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,306 Posts
Have you checked out wireshark @bobbo? nmap just maps ports, wireshark will allow you to monitor traffic.

Ironically enough, the only thing I've installed from the Windows Store is Ubuntu. Win10 has a WSL system that allows you to run Linux within windows. It's more aimed at developers; you can run apache/mysql/etc natively right next to your favorite windows tools. Really just command-line stuff, but the Linux guys who are stuck using Win10 for some things might enjoy trying it.
Wireshark sounded like just the thing and it was vaguely ringing bells, so I installed it, only to be told that I already had it installed. Senility's creeping up on me, I fear. Well, not so much creeping as driving hell for leather, burning tyres and on 2 wheels coming around the hairpins, blasting Motörhead at full volume.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,342 Posts
As pointed out - with W10 you can install various flavours of linux from the store as a subsystem, and they are supported using the new terminal app - which also integrates with all that cloud stuff.

on top of that, W10 professional also comes with hyper-v built in which allows one to run dedicated linux VMs if desired.

in terms of comparing operating systems in terms of performance, spaced used and all that stuff - there is no difference.
If I am going to run Linux, it will not be within Windows. And there is a difference especially when it comes to bloat, when you get away from Linux distros that “do it all for you”. That is why I like Arch Linux. You load only what you want.
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top