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Hey all,

Been thinking about getting my 2013 Bonneville T100 ready for this riding season, and I was thinking about doing some upgrades.

She's all stock right now, so I was going to add a better exhaust (Gasser Customs) along with the TTP EFI Stage 2 Power Induction Kit.

But if I'm going to change the intake, exhaust, and the tune, I figured I might as well go the whole nine yards and drop in a high performance cam too.

Also change the suspension and handlebars, add rearsets... you get the idea.

All these mods are going to get me close to $3000, and I was wondering if changing the bike this way would make it harder to sell in the future. Would it affect the resale value?

I like my Bonnie, just want it to have a little more power and be sportier feeling. I'm not sure if it would be better to sell it as it is and just buy something else.
 

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Yes and no. I've found that you generally will not make back what you put in, but resale will mostly likely be fine since you have people like me who are willing to save money on the mods. Condition matters most. I would say that, as a buyer, I would be more concerned about the cam than anything else. All the other stuff can be unbolted and reversed relatively easily but the cam not so much. I say do everything but the cam, keep it in decent shape, and you should be ok with resale.
 

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Yes and no. I've found that you generally will not make back what you put in, but resale will mostly likely be fine since you have people like me who are willing to save money on the mods. Condition matters most. I would say that, as a buyer, I would be more concerned about the cam than anything else. All the other stuff can be unbolted and reversed relatively easily but the cam not so much. I say do everything but the cam, keep it in decent shape, and you should be ok with resale.
Yeah, especially since I would have to send my cam to Bonneville Performance to have it reground. But the idea of having the Bonneville pull hard to redline is so tempting...
 

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anything you do to a bike will change the resale value. making it into a hot rod might make it desirable for some people, but others would be put off.

if you have receipts for parts and shop work, then a hot rod modification can increase the value, but only for people who want what you're selling. if they're around, you're in high cotton. otherwise maybe not.

some people want stock, and won't trust owner-modified machines.

in the end, i think it boils down to this: will you get enough satisfaction out of the machine in its improved state to justify a possible hit down the road?

in my humble opinion, i think you should make the machine what you want it to be, run the hell out of it, and don't even think about resale.

YOLO
 

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anything you do to a bike will change the resale value. making it into a hot rod might make it desirable for some people, but others would be put off.

if you have receipts for parts and shop work, then a hot rod modification can increase the value, but only for people who want what you're selling. if they're around, you're in high cotton. otherwise maybe not.

some people want stock, and won't trust owner-modified machines.

in the end, i think it boils down to this: will you get enough satisfaction out of the machine in its improved state to justify a possible hit down the road?

in my humble opinion, i think you should make the machine what you want it to be, run the hell out of it, and don't even think about resale.

YOLO
Very well said. +1
 

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Adding an exhaust might increase the appeal to some IF you include the factory exhaust.

Mods the new owner can't retreat from without spending usually puts some people off.

In my experience you'll have a wider potential buyer pool with the bike stock and save your self a lot of money.
 

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I think that any mods you make may very well make it harder to sell. The mods may add anywhere from zero to the value to 25 to 50% to the value of the bike in stock condition. If you can remove the mod and sell them separately, that might be a way to recover closer to 50% of the cost of the mods - if you are lucky. As you modify your bike, you whittle away at your audience for people wanting your bike. So, all that being said, I'd probably modify your bike, but know beforehand, it is not winning or even a breakeven proposition. Good luck!
 

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I've kept all my original parts that have been taken off the bike in wraps just incase I want to sell the bike in the future.
So far all my mods are reversible, so it will give me some option to sell the bike as is, or set back to stock. so far only the front fork springs and the PCV (came with the bike) is more fiddly to remove if I wanted to.

getting the cams done is still debatable for me, as I am not sure if the performance gain I get out of it is worth the expense, thus the satisfaction I get out of it....

so far, I am pretty happy with how the bike is running with the few mods I have done.
 

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Modification in any way is just another way of burning your money . Don't let that stop you if its what you want to do just know that you will never get it back , a bit like that expensive meal you ate or the rare scotch you drank ( nobody wants the end product of those acts either ) . Personally I'd rather ride it than eat or drink it .
 

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I've gone through quite a few used vehicles in my life, so that makes me an expert on the matter, right? [ /s ]

An intake and exhaust aren't a problem. Practically everyone will do one of those two to a bike. They are very easy to take off and return to stock. Rearsets and bars are more of a pain, but not really a problem either. As long as the factory rearsets came with the bike, I wouldn't think twice. A different handlebar is more of a pain, but not a deal breaker. I would want the original one, and would want to make sure nothing was broken when all the controls were moved over.

A tune is a different story though. Maybe it's a good, reliable tune. Maybe it's a time bomb waiting to blow a gasket out, or crack a cylinder. Is it a reputable tuner and a safe, canned tune, or a no name hack job and a "custom" performance tune from "OMG Hellcat Customs Tunes" down the road? A tuner reduces the value of the vehicle in my eyes, sometimes significantly. Cams are a definite deal breaker for me every time. If you've torn the engine apart that much and modified it that extensively, I worry about what else you've done and just aren't telling me about. Such a bike looks like someone else's project bike, not something reliable that I can depend on. The last thing I need is to be rethreading spark plugs and head bolts because some ape buggered up all the threads making sure it was "good-n-tight".

Lots of mods makes the bike harder to sell. If you can find someone looking for exactly what you have, you might get a few bucks for the mods. Even then, you'll be lucky to get $300 for that $3,000 worth of mods. If you're going to modify a bike, do it because you want the mods and consider that money down the drain. Also consider your bike's resale value to drop by about the value of the mods.

The easiest bike to sell is one that is completely stock. Honestly, if you want more power and a sportier feeling, sell Bonnie and get the bike you really want. Or keep Bonnie and park the new one beside her so they can be friends.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I've gone through quite a few used vehicles in my life, so that makes me an expert on the matter, right? [ /s ]

An intake and exhaust aren't a problem. Practically everyone will do one of those two to a bike. They are very easy to take off and return to stock. Rearsets and bars are more of a pain, but not really a problem either. As long as the factory rearsets came with the bike, I wouldn't think twice. A different handlebar is more of a pain, but not a deal breaker. I would want the original one, and would want to make sure nothing was broken when all the controls were moved over.

A tune is a different story though. Maybe it's a good, reliable tune. Maybe it's a time bomb waiting to blow a gasket out, or crack a cylinder. Is it a reputable tuner and a safe, canned tune, or a no name hack job and a "custom" performance tune from "OMG Hellcat Customs Tunes" down the road? A tuner reduces the value of the vehicle in my eyes, sometimes significantly. Cams are a definite deal breaker for me every time. If you've torn the engine apart that much and modified it that extensively, I worry about what else you've done and just aren't telling me about. Such a bike looks like someone else's project bike, not something reliable that I can depend on. The last thing I need is to be rethreading spark plugs and head bolts because some ape buggered up all the threads making sure it was "good-n-tight".

Lots of mods makes the bike harder to sell. If you can find someone looking for exactly what you have, you might get a few bucks for the mods. Even then, you'll be lucky to get $300 for that $3,000 worth of mods. If you're going to modify a bike, do it because you want the mods and consider that money down the drain. Also consider your bike's resale value to drop by about the value of the mods.

The easiest bike to sell is one that is completely stock. Honestly, if you want more power and a sportier feeling, sell Bonnie and get the bike you really want. Or keep Bonnie and park the new one beside her so they can be friends.
Yeah, what you said makes sense. Maybe I'll skip the performance cam and keep mods to a minimum, or maybe I'll just get that Street Triple 765 R I've been eyeing. Not sure what I want to do...
 

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Piss on all this negativity and cam the bike. What's the worst that will happen, you enjoy riding the bike until your sell or wreck it? Is your happiness only worth stock resale value on the bike?

Someone will buy it exactly the way you mod it, don't worry about that. Just do the mods right. These are not Investments they are leisure vehicles that are supposed to make us smile. Stop agonising over this decision.

3k is real money, sure, but it's really not. Bet me you waste $250/month on things that don't make you happy.
 

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Piss on all this negativity and cam the bike. What's the worst that will happen, you enjoy riding the bike until your sell or wreck it? Is your happiness only worth stock resale value on the bike?

Someone will buy it exactly the way you mod it, don't worry about that. Just do the mods right. These are not Investments they are leisure vehicles that are supposed to make us smile. Stop agonising over this decision.

3k is real money, sure, but it's really not. Bet me you waste $250/month on things that don't make you happy.
Lol, yeah, I am overthinking it. Doing all these mods will still be cheaper than buying another bike.
 

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Well that and (not to get too weird about it) we are a culture that is fear-based now. It's pervasive.

Make sure you have the following insurance policies: health, pet, flood, fire, dental, gap protection, credit card, identity theft, life, accessory, surge and so on.

We are subjected to fear based pressure to buy and do things constantly. Don't do that, it might void the warranty and then where will you be? Garbage.

I could go on, but this about modding something who's sole purpose is make you happy while you go places. Don't give in to the fear.
 

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After 50 years of Triumphs, I’ve learned that Triumphs don’t carry resale. I have put thousands upon thousands into performance mods on Rockets, T-Bird, and Bonnevilles. It doesn’t mean squat on the market, which is pretty slim for Triumphs in general, although there are some who desire completely stock bikes, especially the classics. I strongly advise you to do everything you want to do to the bike to make yourself happy. It won’t affect your resale or change anything when you decide on a new bike.
 

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I have never been satisfied with a stock bike I have always had to do modifications to my bikes to fit my needs as a Ryder. Just keep all the o.e.m. Parts u remove or replace for the next owner. I have pics and records of my builds from start to finish to provide to the next potential owner. All my custom bikes I built are quality trophy show winners which speak of my passionate labor I put into a build or customization that the next potential owner will appreciate. A well kept bike with low milage modded or not will sell fast for the right price And a bike with higher milage that still looks like new will sell for a fair price too if u keep all the service records. I always try to buy desirable certain year bike models that makes reselling easier.
and anyways u can look at it in a different perspective, u can leave everything stock or u can stand out from the crowd in looks and performance by doing tasteful and sensible mods and enjoy your bikes potential to the fullest as a machine And as a Ryder. I think it’s just natural progression as a m/c Ryder to want to modify your bike to your personal needs since they are not perfectly set up with everything u want off the show room from the factory, unless it’s a TTR...lol I think they did a pretty great job to fit a ryders needs compared to any stock factory bike I ever bought.
I have never kept a M/C stock, everyone knows the first thing to change on a stock bike is the exhaust...lol for weight savings and performance enhancement. I really like the look of the stock TTR exhaust cans but they just don’t have the growl and bark and popping like aftermarket performance cans, unless u know what u are doing I am sure stock cans can b gutted out too. I just had to have the custom built well crafted British customs moto GP cans on my TTR, super happy with them.
I will give u one very important piece of advise when u do decide to modify or replace parts really try to avoid Chinese aftermarket parts, 9 out of 10 times u will have to modify something to get them to fit and usually will open a can of worms and have u scratching your head Trying to make them fit or work.
They always claim that Chinese aftermarket parts are direct bolt on and fit just like o.e.m. Parts but this is a big misconception believe me.
I know my TTR is built in Thailand so I am not totally sure if it’s Chinese parts free...lol but when I decided to mod it I vowed not to buy any Chinese aftermarket replacement parts for it. As far as I know Everything I ordered for my TTR was made by U.K. or American businesses that specialize in building quality o.e.m. Replacement parts for Triumph. The only thing that might b Chinese I put on my bike,p I could b wrong is a knurled temp gauge from A&J, but I figured if it’s good enough for their builds it’s good enough for me, fits perfect and works great!
i have a good friend who professionally builds super high end custom bikes and anytime I had a fitment problem with aftermarket parts I knew he would have the answer I am looking for Because of his vast experience as a custom bike builder.
I would present my fitment problem to him and the first thing he would say is I know what your problem is already, it’s Chinese made! End of story!...lol
so do your homework and research well before u purchase any aftermarket replacement parts, I haven’t been on here long but I know one thing for sure is there are plenty of members here with great mechanical knowledge and abilities and experience when it comes to building or replacing parts on Triumphs that I would definitely respect their opinion and advice they could give to avoid making common modifications mistakes. Just some food for thought, Hope this helps! .... FTG
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