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Discussion Starter #1
It's been several years since I last owned a Triumph; a 900 Triple named Daybird due to me creating it by combining a Daytona and a Thunderbird into one. Now, I am convinced it is time to look deeply into getting a new Triumph 900, a 2018 model.

Now, why the '18 and not the '19 model? And why not the 1200? Basically, price, looks and weight, in the case of the 1200.

Here, a 2018 Street Twin is 10500 GBP. In addition, I can pick extras for a bit over 800 pounds worth for free, meaning the bare bike could be said to cost 9700. And since I prefer the looks of the 2016-18 model over the new version AND the new cost 11400 (no extras included here), it makes sense to go for the older version.

A 2019 T120 cost 15500 GBP, while the far more interesting Speed Twin adding another 900 pounds to that price. To me, that is a massive extra to pay for a - to me - relatively small return.

The things I like about the Street Twin are the cast wheels, the limited power output with strong midrange, the fairly nimble weight, the single front disc, the soft suspension settings, the clean lines and the overall simplicity. What I dislike is the restricted leg room, restrictive seat, slightly low handlebars plus the lack of a rev counter, centre stand and heated grips as standard. I'd also like a fuel tank with at least 50% more capacity in an ideal world.

Fitting a rev counter and a little taller bars should be simple enough, and the comfort seat off a T120 should sort all the seating complaints. Add heated grips and a centre stand, and the bike is very nearly perfect. And it will still be between 5 and 6 grand under the only 1200 I'd consider, the Speed Twin - I won't live with tube type wheels.
 

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Seems like good reasons for your decision. I'm a fan of the Street Twin; owned a 2016 for 600 miles before falling under the spell of a green Thruxton. Found the Street Twin lots of fun due to its low and mid range power, great exhaust note, and pleasant handling. My only quibble would be the stock tires. IMO the styling is clean and the stainless steel exhaust looks as good as it sounds. The motorcycle is also fairly comfortable and is geared high, so highway travel is well within its capabilities. I fitted a T120 comfort seat to my Street Twin by lowering the rear fender, an easy modification. Suggest you also consider one of the new seats recently introduced by British Bike Bits for the liquid cooled twins. Didn't find an easy solution to fitting a tachometer, but at least one forum member has solved that problem. Good luck on your choice.
 

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I rode both the Street Twin and the T120 before buying and the Street was a "nice" bike. Lightweight, handled well and was very well mannered overall, a gentleman's ride. Couldn't really find any faults with it during my test ride. I pulled into the parking lot thinking, this is the bike. For the money it was a sweet deal and sweet ride. I hopped on the T120 and when I got to twist the grip, I started laughing in my helmet. The T120 just had way more grunt then the Twin and I'm a TQ whore too be honest, so it was a no brainer for me. Heated grips, Tach, more HP/TQ, CC option amongst other items made it worth the extra $2700 USD or whatever it was. That said, budget matters and what we individually want matters. I would tell you this however, ride both before deciding because there is no better way to make a smart decision then to test all the samples first. Good luck and enjoy whatever it is you ride!
 

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My two cents on the fuel tank. I went from a 24 litre tank on my airhead to the 12 litre Street Twin and was really concerned. But with legal speed touring I've had a best of 280km from 11 litres. My worst, largely around town, is 204km for 11 litres. The efficiency of the engine means that I've almost doubled the urban fuel economy (R100 10 litres per 100 km to to 5 litres per 100 km) and touring fuel economy is more than a third better (R100 6.25 litre per 100km to 4 litres per 100km). Your mileage will vary based on the right wrist, of course! Australian limit is 110kmh and there is so much radar around I rarely travel faster and I tend to get onto country roads where possible. I fitted T120 footpegs and levers, which give great leg room with the standard seat. But the standard seat is a plank so my posterior is getting a T120 seat soon. As a previous caller said, it's just a matter of dropping the rear fender and perhaps raising the seat lock. Can't get the standard pillion grab rail on without cutting the T120 seats though, the run much deeper around the frame.
I haven't ridden the 2019 Street Twin yet but I would not be averse to better quality front suspension and brakes.
 

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Another Street Twin lover here! I got a new one in May '16, and am still digging it. Mods I've done are simple and useful...barrel grips, metal brake reservoir, 7/8" bar risers, matching silver flyscreen, grab rail, and 3 seats...stock, bench (for 2-up), and I just got a Corbin Gunfighter (see my recent post)...a real luxury seat. It also puts you a lot higher up, which lessens the knew bend. Gas mileage is very good, around 60mpg, so the range is not an issue. I am not a hp junkie, so the stock power and suspension is fine for me and my weight. A very nimble bike. Lots of useful torque and midrange pull. Love it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you all for the good feedback and suggestions - highly appreciated!

I also dig torque; the VS1400 I once had was excellent in that regard, without top end power to lure one into going fast. Same with the Virago 1100 I built into a scrambler, which wasn't much weaker. But the nicest engine of all I've had the pleasure of using sat in the MT07 I had in 2017. Unfortunately, after fitting it with proper suspension bits, I also began riding way too fast way too often, throwing sparks around fast and slow corners alike. Have had far too many serious accidents in my life and knew I was on the road to another one, so let the Yamaha move on. But what an engine!

I see the Street Twin as a more relaxed ride than the MT07, with more torque that can be cashed in in the form of less rpm. Just as much as I love torque, I also dislike rpm. In that regard, the MT01 is tempting, turning just over 2000 rpm at 60 mph. However, it's another bike with handling too tempting to use, meaning high risk of me riding over my meager abilities.

BTW, the MT07 had a 14 litre tank and would go 70 to 80 miles per UK gallon, depending on the terrain and speed, giving it a range of up to 250 mi /400 km. I consider 200 mi/300+ km to be the absolute minimum acceptable range for me. (We are limited to 50 mph on the majority of roads here, and speed limits are heavily enforced. 20 mph over that limit will hand you a fine of 1000 pounds, and a little more speed will see the licence being evoked. I mentioned this mostly to explain the respectable fuel consumption, which came as a result of me using 6th gear above 40 mph together with the moderate cruising speeds.)

Sorry for wandering off my own topic here. I still believe the Street Twin will suit me brilliantly, but I will take the advice given and also try the 1200. BTW, are there cast wheels for the T120 that doesn't cost an arm and a leg?
 

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Thank you all for the good feedback and suggestions - highly appreciated!



BTW, the MT07 had a 14 litre tank and would go 70 to 80 miles per UK gallon, depending on the terrain and speed, giving it a range of up to 250 mi /400 km. I consider 200 mi/300+ km to be the absolute minimum acceptable range for me. (We are limited to 50 mph on the majority of roads here, and speed limits are heavily enforced. 20 mph over that limit will hand you a fine of 1000 pounds, and a little more speed will see the licence being evoked. I mentioned this mostly to explain the respectable fuel consumption, which came as a result of me using 6th gear above 40 mph together with the moderate cruising speeds.)

Sorry for wandering off my own topic here. I still believe the Street Twin will suit me brilliantly, but I will take the advice given and also try the 1200. BTW, are there cast wheels for the T120 that doesn't cost an arm and a leg?
I thought your screen name sounded familiar, Were you on the MT07/FZ07 forum? I was there as RHB, also coming from an MT07 to the street Twin over a year ago, ask me anything about the transition, I have a distinct handle on it. PM might be better. AT aggressive riding style on 2 lane roads, I'm good for 200 kilometers plus reserve (blinking light) on the Street Twin. definitely polar opposites.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Have you made your decision
Is it still the speed twin, or will you sell your soul to get the T120

With winter at full song here, it's still a few months until any kind of test ride can be made. I'm inclined towards the Street Twin, but am open to have my mind changed with a test ride.
 

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I have about 5600 miles on a 2018 Street Twin in the 10 months I have owned it including a few weekend trips totaling about 500 miles of riding. I find this bike perfect for me and its capabilities far outpace my own. It's one of those bikes that makes the heart skip a beat every time you look at it and makes you feel as though all is not well if you are not riding it. You also need to add about 10 minutes to all your gas stops, grocery and beer runs as someone has something nice to say about the bike every time you stop it where people exist. I enjoy riding the back roads and this is light and nimble enough to keep you excited on the twisties without actively trying to kill you. I stay off the highway as much as I can but the bike has more than enough grunt to get on and off the highway as well as get past other vehicles comfortably. It can even get you a speeding ticket if you like collecting them. All that said, it does follow tar lines on the road like a distracted dog and the seat can be on the harder side for some. Like many have already said, do test ride as many different bikes as you can before buying one. Cheers and do post some pictures when you decide to pull the trigger.
 

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The Street Twin is a nice bike, easy to throw around and not intimidating, but I regretted the purchase pretty quickly. It just doesn't have the power I would prefer and I feel I am always looking for more. I also had to change a lot on it to get it to where I wanted aesthetically, sure that was fun but still costly...but again purely subjective. I originally ordered a Thruxton but changed my mind, should've went with my first instinct. Anyway, if it works for you great, just make sure it is something you will not tire of quickly is all I can advise. I will either be getting a discounted Thruxton (still requires changes) or a Speed Twin (almost no changes) this year probably since I have had the Twin almost 3 years now.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
The Street Twin is a nice bike, easy to throw around and not intimidating, but I regretted the purchase pretty quickly. It just doesn't have the power I would prefer and I feel I am always looking for more. I also had to change a lot on it to get it to where I wanted aesthetically, sure that was fun but still costly...but again purely subjective. I originally ordered a Thruxton but changed my mind, should've went with my first instinct. Anyway, if it works for you great, just make sure it is something you will not tire of quickly is all I can advise. I will either be getting a discounted Thruxton (still requires changes) or a Speed Twin (almost no changes) this year probably since I have had the Twin almost 3 years now.

Thank you for bringing up a theme that can be very important for a lot of potential owners. Personally, I have owned bikes from 50 to 1400 ccm, from 2 to 130 hp, and from 1 to 6 cylinders. I can be happy with 25 hp, but to keep up with mates on tour without constantly having to pin the throttle, 40 hp or more is preferable. The 75 hp MT07 had more power than I needed, the 70 hp Virago 1100 was nearly as quick, but not nearly as fast, although plenty fast enough for our roads and police enforcement. My current bike is a Honda NT650V Deauville with a claimed 56 hp and a wet weight of 238 kg / 525 lbs. It is very unexciting, but relaxing and fast enough. A Street Twin is lighter, has the same top end and a lot more torque - 80 Nm @ 3230 rpm vs 55 Nm @ 6250 rpm - which means it will offer superior performance the way I ride.

For those who understand German, this video below by 1000PS and seasoned tester Zonko gives heaps of praise for the Street Twin. Not that we should ever base our choices entirely on the words of journalists, but when it comes to the 900 HT engine, the general consensus seems to be that of satisfaction.

 

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Discussion Starter #16
I am also considering a 2017 (new, unsold stock) T100 Jet Black instead of a Street Twin, provided the shop is willing to swap the wire wheels with a set from on of their 2018 Street Twins on their shop floor at no additional cost. Although 1000 GPB dearer than the Street Twin, the T100 has some benefits that I like:

Larger fuel tank worth 40 miles of cruising
Wider fuel tank with pads for better knee grip and more comfort (I like to splay my legs)
Rev counter
Taller, flatter seat by 40 mm / 1.5 inches for more leg room and overall higher comfort
Lower, more forward foot pegs for even more leg room and comfort
Suspension is said offer slightly more control

On the negative side, I like the overall look of the Street Twin slightly better, the T100 is 24 lbs heavier (although 14 of those will be gained back with the mentioned wheel change) and the cornering clearance is less due to the lower pegs. Still, overall the T100 start to look like the better choice, although for me, the most important aspect will be the wheels; I dislike wire wheels in general and tube type rims in particular. That means a T100 is only relevant as long as I can get it with cast wheels.
 

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I am also considering a 2017 (new, unsold stock) T100 Jet Black instead of a Street Twin, provided the shop is willing to swap the wire wheels with a set from on of their 2018 Street Twins on their shop floor at no additional cost. Although 1000 GPB dearer than the Street Twin, the T100 has some benefits that I like:

Larger fuel tank worth 40 miles of cruising
Wider fuel tank with pads for better knee grip and more comfort (I like to splay my legs)
Rev counter
Taller, flatter seat by 40 mm / 1.5 inches for more leg room and overall higher comfort
Lower, more forward foot pegs for even more leg room and comfort
Suspension is said offer slightly more control

On the negative side, I like the overall look of the Street Twin slightly better, the T100 is 24 lbs heavier (although 14 of those will be gained back with the mentioned wheel change) and the cornering clearance is less due to the lower pegs. Still, overall the T100 start to look like the better choice, although for me, the most important aspect will be the wheels; I dislike wire wheels in general and tube type rims in particular. That means a T100 is only relevant as long as I can get it with cast wheels.
I bought a Street Twin, added T120 footpegs and a T120 comfort seat is coming. Which is kinda the reverse of what you propose by putting Street Twin wheels on a T100. If I could have bought a T100 with tubeless tyres I would have gone that route (although I like the Street Twin's 70's design more than the more retry T100). Fuel tank size has not been an issue for me on the Street Twin as the fuel economy is unbelievable at cruising speeds below 120kmh.
 

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The beauty of the modern classic range is the interchangeability of parts. Like a bike but not the wheels? Sure, swap them over! The T100 is just a Street Twin in a Tux.. :grin2:

I bought the T100 because I liked the looks. A 2017 bike that looks like it was made in 1967, perfect for an old(er) guy like me. The bigger tank, more roomy ergonomics and twin clocks sealing the deal.

I would think the dealer would change the wheels for you (more people want to buy a Street Twin with ‘classic’ spoked wheels) as he would not only be clearing his stock of an outgoing model but making a different outgoing model more saleable. Win/win!

Good luck.

 

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The beauty of the modern classic range is the interchangeability of parts. Like a bike but not the wheels? Sure, swap them over! The T100 is just a Street Twin in a Tux.. :grin2:

I bought the T100 because I liked the looks. A 2017 bike that looks like it was made in 1967, perfect for an old(er) guy like me. The bigger tank, more roomy ergonomics and twin clocks sealing the deal.

I would think the dealer would change the wheels for you (more people want to buy a Street Twin with ‘classic’ spoked wheels) as he would not only be clearing his stock of an outgoing model but making a different outgoing model more saleable. Win/win!

Good luck.



I need windows like this in my garage.


2017 T100- LSL Flat Tracker handlebars, Booster Plug, Modified comfort seat with Supracor, Chrome Grab Rail, Triumph Barrel Style Hand Grips, Aluminum Oil Filler Cap, Cibie 82240 Light unit, Triumph Center Stand
 
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