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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What a lot of aggravation it turns out to be to buy an old bike in this country (USA).

If I buy a bike in NY and bring it down to NC, I have to get it re-titled, even though NY doesnt require this of bikes older than 1973 (so it has no title).
NC says I need the last 3 years registrations or the owners original bill of sale from 20 years ago!!!! If I dont have them it has to be bonded or something. PLUS it has to be insepcted by a state official regardless!!!!

My question: why do i need to title it and register it? If i dont ride it (only maybe on PRIVATE land somewhere).

Not being American I guess Im not understanding something: I thought this was one country? Why are all these different states requiring different things. Money is my guess.

If I have a bill of sale notorized when I buy it, my guess is im good if i resale it? Or am i missing something?

Cheers.
 

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Can You Spell....$$$$$$$$$$
It's What Makes The World (government) Go 'round: Jim
 

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There must be some sort of exemption for old stuff in NC... there's a lot of it around down there.

I had a tough time transferring title on a '72 Triumph from Michigan to Ohio... you'd have thought I was buying a %$# house!
 

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If you're not going to register it (which allows you to operate it on public roads and legally park it in public areas) then don't bother. If you're eventually going to register it and have no title, just go through a title service and let them do the work. The TITLE simply states that you are the legal owner. The REGISTRATION allows you to use it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If you're not going to register it (which allows you to operate it on public roads and legally park it in public areas) then don't bother. If you're eventually going to register it and have no title, just go through a title service and let them do the work. The TITLE simply states that you are the legal owner. The REGISTRATION allows you to use it.
Oh I see. Sorry for these dumb questions. heres another :D

Could I tell them (the DMV) that i only want a title - i dont want it registered since I wont be using it on any public roads. In fact, could I jest tell them it doesnt run and Im keeping it as a non running antique?

I just imagine them wanting more cash out of me to register it.
 

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I would imagine so ... "I already OWN it ... I just want the paper that says that YOU recognize that I own it" followed by "It isn't operable. I don't need a registration for it to sit inside my personal property". If the clerk is difficult, ask for the supervisor ... they are usually (marginally) smarter.
 

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IF YOU AREN"T GOING TO RIDE IT on the street, you DO NOT have to register it (unless there's something I don't know about NC's already ridiculous titling requirements).

www.its-titles.com will get it licensed for the street with a new Maine license plate good for one year, if you provide proof of insurance.

If you don't intend to live in NC permanently, tell them to take a flying leap.
 

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I lived in NC for 5+ years many years ago. I didn't own a car when I moved there, but still needed to transfer my license from VA to NC for the sake of legality, residency, etc. Anyway, the clerk informed me that I needed an insurance policy to have a license. "What would you like me to insure? ... my work boots? ... I DON'T OWN A CAR" ... "well, sir ... why do you need a driver's license?" ... UGH!

It turned into a very long ordeal ... in the end, because it's up to their discretion and I had not been very nice, they also made me take the road test ... remember, I didn't own a car ...

Anyway, NC can really be a nightmare to deal with ... but to be fair ... Virginia is definitely not much better, if any at all. DMV just plain SUCKS ... (or MVA if you happen to live in MD ... it USED to be called DMV like the other states, but NOOOO ... God forbid we have any kind of consistency)
 

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I may be missing something here, but if you are not going to register it, how would the officials know that you even have it? Just like buying a tv set in another state, no?
I bet there are a pile of vehicles in a local junk yard near you that are not registered.
I think you may be confused in the requirements. They most likely mean if or when you want to register it, then you need certain papers.

On the otherhand, if you want a title you need to jump through the hoops, basically to prove to them that it is not stolen, and I can't blame them for that. I'd want that same protection myself.

In our state, a title comes as a part of the registration process.
 

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In our state, a title comes as a part of the registration process.
Unless you're not registering it ...

A vehicle title is basically a 'deed'. It accurately describes the specific vehicle (VIN, make, model, often mileage, etc) and states who is the legal owner of that vehicle.

Often, title and registration happen as a package because you bought a vehicle and took the signed title and bill of sale to DMV where you titled it (so you legally own it) and registered it (so you can drive it). However, if it's that old bike you've owned for years that's been in your barn, you dig the title out of your files and go to DMV. In this instance, you already have a title and are simply registering it so you can drive it legally. Every year (or 2) when your 'plates go dead' (or, your registration expires) you simply renew your registration. DMV isn't sending you a new title every year or two.

In fact, as a rule, you don't even need to have a license to title a vehicle. A 7 year old can OWN a vehicle (and have it titled in his name) but he can not DRIVE one (DMV would NOT issue a registration in his name).
 

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hey t100rc , isn't NC the state that in the past year or so stopped recognizing vin's with less than the modern amount ? and people that had old bikes got notices that their titles were no longer valid ? it's been a popular topic on another forum .
 

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I don't know, but it wouldn't surprise me ... it's so much less expensive to just screw a whole bunch of citizens than to actually properly set up your computer system.

I just had to go through a whole bunch of VIN fun with Virginia to title my Mercedes ... it's a European model and the VIN isn't US standard.
DMV: "you're going to need to bring the car here" ...
Me: "right ... remember that I'm here to title and register this car? ... in other words, it doesn't currently have license plates on it" ...
DMV: "you're going to have to bring it here" ...
Me: :cool:
(I drove it to DMV with the plates from my van on it)
 

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Unless you're not registering it ...

A vehicle title is basically a 'deed'. It accurately describes the specific vehicle (VIN, make, model, often mileage, etc) and states who is the legal owner of that vehicle.

Often, title and registration happen as a package because you bought a vehicle and took the signed title and bill of sale to DMV where you titled it (so you legally own it) and registered it (so you can drive it). However, if it's that old bike you've owned for years that's been in your barn, you dig the title out of your files and go to DMV. In this instance, you already have a title and are simply registering it so you can drive it legally. Every year (or 2) when your 'plates go dead' (or, your registration expires) you simply renew your registration. DMV isn't sending you a new title every year or two.

In fact, as a rule, you don't even need to have a license to title a vehicle. A 7 year old can OWN a vehicle (and have it titled in his name) but he can not DRIVE one (DMV would NOT issue a registration in his name).
I should have more more clear on stating that a new title is issued from the first registration process in our state, which requires you bring in the former owner's title (or certificate of origin on a new vehicle) with a few exceptions, a bill of sale and a mileage statement. In the exceptional cases, including all out of state purchased vehcles, Our dmv requires inspecting the vehicle, looking at the body and engine id numbers and then doing a title search to see if the vehicle has a theft record. You can't drive the vehicle to that inspection without temporary registration, so unless you trailer it, you are stuck in the dmv circle of life.
So back to what I said about titling and registration being from the same effort (here) unless you have a transfer title in hand.

Anyone under 18 years old can NOT legally own ANYTHING in our stste.
Children can not own vehicle.
Owning a vehicle carries with it liabilities regarding damage and personal injury, so that right is limited to responsible adults.
But then again, I suppose that those things vary from state to state.

But if the fellow is not going to register it, why the bother?
If he sells it, the requirements are for titling and registration are going to be coming from the state of its new home, not his state.
 

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Anyone under 18 years old can NOT legally own ANYTHING in our stste.
Children can not own vehicle.
Owning a vehicle carries with it liabilities regarding damage and personal injury, so that right is limited to responsible adults.
But then again, I suppose that those things vary from state to state.
I've never heard of a vehicle spontaneously injuring anyone ... it's the DRIVING of a vehicle that carries liabilities ...

But if the fellow is not going to register it, why the bother?
If he sells it, the requirements are for titling and registration are going to be coming from the state of its new home, not his state.
You would want the deed to a piece of property that you owned but weren't going to live on, wouldn't you?

Anyway, I've accidentally hijacked this thread and I apologize.

To answer the original question, if you're not going to drive it you do not need to register it. Whether you title it or not is up to you. You already own it ... a title is simply the state's official recognition of that fact.
 

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Kev,

With all due respect and with no malice or intention of insulting anyone that has provided info so far.... Why are you asking us?? Why aren't you posing all these questions to the folks at your local DMV? You may get all correct answers here, but you also may not and showing up at DMV in any state usually means waiting in line for a long time. It's a bummer to get to the window after all that waiting and find you you don't have everything you need.

You might be able to go to your state's DMV website to get the answers to all your questions.

To answer your first question about this being one country, yes it most certainly is. But the country was founded on the principals that the Federal govt has limited juridiction over local matters. The states, counties, parishes, cities, towns, villages, etc. all have the power to make local laws. I would guess that some things back in Merry Ole England are legal in one town and not in the next. Motor vehicle laws are state laws. There is no Federal requirement to have a drivers license, registration for your car, etc. Only interstate commerce type laws apply to vehicles. I'm talking about things like compressed gas tankers and things of that nature. Some states, Virginia I believe is one, even tax your vehicle as real property.

Get the straight story on what you need to do, what is optional and what you don't need to do, directly from your local DMV information desk. Then you'll know. Everyone loves to hate DMV. But I've found that griping about something you have no control over is wasted effort. Just go in with a smile, ask your questions and listen to the answers. If you start to argue because you think what they are telling you does not make sense, they will more than likely get very official, tell you the same thing again and then yell "NEXT". But if you treat them nicely, you'd be amazed at how patient and helpful the can be.
Good luck. From what some of the others have said, it does not sound like it's an easy process where you are.
regards,
Rob
 

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Hello Kev_England,

My first post as I need to welcome you to the hole know as
North Carolina.

Your title problems run deep my friend. It all started last year
when the head of the DMV was helping his "friend" out. He
got a title for a new kit car a 2008 model and got it push through
as a 1927. A loss of about 4,000 dollars in taxes. So he got
found out.

His last act as the head of the DMV was to launch a full probe
into this matter. Thus title laws changed as the first of the year.
We all took that one.

Any vechile over thirity five years of age is included, or any
vechile that comes from a bill of sale state. As in the titleing
firms on the web are no good. It boils down to the state of
North Carolina is trying to get every vechile 35 years or older
off of the road. No tax money to be had on a 500.00 vechile.
The DMV no longer handles anything over 35 years old when
transfering titles, it all goes through the inspector.

So even if you just want a title, it still has to run and pass
state inspection. Yah, I know stupid. Oh and when the
inspector show up that other person with them is the theift
inspector. They have the power to hop on your ride and
take it at a moments notice. As in "I think this maybe stolen".

My advise for you is part it out or sell it out of state. A clean
frame with a title is worth at least 100.00 now if not more.
Title and Frame number have to match.

I paid out a 500.00 extra on a bommer of a ride because it had
a clean title. It was a 1979 unit and still I had to sign five
different wavers at the DMV.

There is a way to do it with paperwork and a bonded title, but
I gave up at the 12th form I was given at the third trip to
the DMV.

Good luck from the mountains of NC

Pookybear
 

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THIS MUST BE FOUGHT!! Maybe the AMA and / or some of the classic car organizations would be interested in working with you on overturning this. Holy crap! I thought Virginia was bad ... this is reprehensible!!

So, North Carolina has managed to redefine ownership. "You can OWN any property you would like. But, if it's a vehicle of a certain age, it must be complete and viable." If you own a 1986 Camaro that's all taken apart, you can still legally title it and have official paperwork stating such ... but, if you have a '68 Bonneville that you're interested in restoring ...

Hello Kev_England,

My first post as I need to welcome you to the hole know as
North Carolina.

Your title problems run deep my friend. It all started last year
when the head of the DMV was helping his "friend" out. He
got a title for a new kit car a 2008 model and got it push through
as a 1927. A loss of about 4,000 dollars in taxes. So he got
found out.

His last act as the head of the DMV was to launch a full probe
into this matter. Thus title laws changed as the first of the year.
We all took that one.

Any vechile over thirity five years of age is included, or any
vechile that comes from a bill of sale state. As in the titleing
firms on the web are no good. It boils down to the state of
North Carolina is trying to get every vechile 35 years or older
off of the road. No tax money to be had on a 500.00 vechile.
The DMV no longer handles anything over 35 years old when
transfering titles, it all goes through the inspector.

So even if you just want a title, it still has to run and pass
state inspection. Yah, I know stupid. Oh and when the
inspector show up that other person with them is the theift
inspector. They have the power to hop on your ride and
take it at a moments notice. As in "I think this maybe stolen".

My advise for you is part it out or sell it out of state. A clean
frame with a title is worth at least 100.00 now if not more.
Title and Frame number have to match.

I paid out a 500.00 extra on a bommer of a ride because it had
a clean title. It was a 1979 unit and still I had to sign five
different wavers at the DMV.

There is a way to do it with paperwork and a bonded title, but
I gave up at the 12th form I was given at the third trip to
the DMV.

Good luck from the mountains of NC

Pookybear
 

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Absolutely unconstitutional.

PERIOD.

Personal private property, obtained legally, cannot be manipulated by the state except in VERY rare and extreme circumstances where eminent domain is required for the public good.

I believe NC riders should band together (perhaps with the AMA and it's legal team), and overturn that confiscatory law.

Absolutely absurd.
 

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That is the wildest thing I've ever heard. People say NY has some restrictive and crazy laws. Well, I think we take a back seat to the poor folks in NC.
condolences,
Rob
 
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