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Discussion Starter #1
I've been thinking about an aftermarket sprocket cover, for no good reason other than looks. But every time I pull the stock one off to clean it, I'm struck by how thick and heavy it is. It makes me nervous that putting a more minimalist one on might somehow be a mistake. Does anyone know if there's a functional reason the stock piece is so beefy? Is it just to match the engine case, or is there some terrible fate it's protecting me from?

I'm finding now that I'm stuck inside, I've got time to ask stupid questions... :/

Thanks!
 

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On the Bonneville series I suspect it's meant to give a 'pre-unit' look in line with the retro vibe. The pre-unit transmission looked a bit like this, with the drive sprocket on the opposite side.
 

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You won't have any problems at all going with a slimmed down stylish after market sprocket cover. Keep in mind oil and sludge spins off the sprocket so whatever you choose I suggest getting one that has appropriate protection to catch the flinging oil. Many aftermarket covers do not so be selective.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
On the Bonneville series I suspect it's meant to give a 'pre-unit' look in line with the retro vibe. The pre-unit transmission looked a bit like this, with the drive sprocket on the opposite side.
Ah... that makes perfect sense. Thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
You won't have any problems at all going with a slimmed down stylish after market sprocket cover. Keep in mind oil and sludge spins off the sprocket so whatever you choose I suggest getting one that has appropriate protection to catch the flinging oil. Many aftermarket covers do not so be selective.
Chuckling... excellent advice, just the kind of thing I wouldn't have thought of.
 

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Buy a spare and modify it yourself , I cut my own down . You could start by drilling holes , maybe a pattern of your own design . Depending what tools you have it could keep you occupied anywhere between a couple of hours to a couple of days . Think of the kudos " yeah I did it myself with a tooth pick and a nail file " .
 

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As Hpig said take the oem and modify it.........here's what I did.
[url=https://postimg.cc/k2D5Rt0W][/URL]

picture url
No offense intended but there are many reasons not to run a sprocket cover so naked, crap thrown off on pants, shoes etc. Then road debris thrown in there. OTOH, on several of my Ducati’s i ran drilled covers and then a very cool clear one, only cause it looked badazz.
 

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I don't experience any of that on the contrary since I can see the sprocket and have easy access to it I keep the entire area nice and clean.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
As Hpig said take the oem and modify it.........here's what I did.
[url=https://postimg.cc/k2D5Rt0W][/URL]

picture url
That's nice work. Unfortunately, I don't own anything that will cut metal (although a pine sprocket cover would be amusing), but that looks great.

On the general question of flinging, I guess I'm not too concerned... it's not the bike I choose when its wet out, and I tend to run my chains dry, so that's a risk I think I can deal with.

Thanks again, all.
 

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The sprocket cover primarily has a safety function, so you decide if you want a high speed chain and sprocket running open beside your foot.
 

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It's still winter here in Minnesota USA and cleaning is all there is to do.
Hey yrunvs! Down here in Saint Paul the last of our snow just melted. I've heard there's still some lingering UpNorth. My bike is definitely all tarted up and ready for some longer rides. Trips to Target just don't satisfy. By the way, your modified sprocket cover is the bees' knees!
 
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