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It seems abt every time I ride the thing turns into a race! I have not raced it or anything else.

Imho I think that the Thrux is a great track day bike. Assuming that you have an attitude that fits within your skill level and that maybe 1000cc sport bikes can be a bit of a handful, the Thrux is good because you can ride it flat out for a lot more of a lap than you can with a sportsbike. I my experience riding in the medium and medium fast groups I end up running mid field or a bit higher. I have a 1050 Sprint and at Phillip Island which is a fast hp track I somehow manage nearly identical lap times between them. Don't underestimate the ability of the bike, be careful about your own abilities and aspirations. They aren't a precise race bike but they are a hell of a lot of fun, and can draw admiration from those who would normally dismiss them as a joke. There is a poster on this forum who has a modified scrambler, think of a Thrux with a 270 crank, he races and manages to chase races all up and down the east coast of Aus. Can't recall his name though.

Cheers, Simmo
 

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If I went on track I think you would have to use a calender on me , not a stopwatch :)

cheers Staf
 

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I've done trackdays with my T100. I've also done some laps at the Nurburgring.

Racing these bikes is great fun, but obviously limited in some ways. For most guys these bikes will handle better than they can utilize, so they have no need for a "proper" R-bike.

Go for it, and have fun. If you have or build up your skills, you may just outrun (atleast in the twisties) a few of the crotch-rockets.
 

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I have done 5 track days on Booger, (my black, 06 Thruxton) and one on Tweety, the yellow 06 Thruxton that I bought specifically for trackdays. My purpose for doing trackdays was just to improve my skills. I am pleased to find that, while I remain embarrassingly slow, my skills have definitely improved. When cooler weather returns I will resume my much needed education.

To answer the question, the Thruxton is never going to be as fast as a sport bike. However, 90% of what happens on the track is due to the rider. You will find that you won't be riding this bike like a sport bike, your style will be a little different. However, since I started with the Thruxton, I don't know the difference. I just see it in the pictures of myself and other riders. The bike remains better than I am.

Art.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have done 5 track days on Booger, (my black, 06 Thruxton) and one on Tweety, the yellow 06 Thruxton that I bought specifically for trackdays. My purpose for doing trackdays was just to improve my skills. I am pleased to find that, while I remain embarrassingly slow, my skills have definitely improved. When cooler weather returns I will resume my much needed education.

To answer the question, the Thruxton is never going to be as fast as a sport bike. However, 90% of what happens on the track is due to the rider. You will find that you won't be riding this bike like a sport bike, your style will be a little different. However, since I started with the Thruxton, I don't know the difference. I just see it in the pictures of myself and other riders. The bike remains better than I am.

Art.
:cool:

How have you setup your dedicated track Thruxton?
 

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Well, my "set up" probably isn't what most would consider "race prep". As far as performance is concerned it's pretty much stock although during this "off season" I am working on eliminating the air box and adding K&N filters. Also, on the advice of other riders, I will be adding a steering damper.

My "set up" has been to remove anything that I could get off the bike that wasn't essential. I figure that if I crash, anything in a box at home can't get broke. I made "bash plates" (not my term but race control's) to cover the left and right engine cases. These I made from scrap pieces of aluminum. Removed the headlight and side covers replacing them with home made panels made from scrap plastic painted flat black. I made some bar ends, hoping that they would save the levers. Of course the rear lights, fender, and cowl went.

I changed the oil and filter and serviced the front forks. I went with a little heaver fork oil but may go back during this next season.

The previous owner had replaced the rear tire with a brand new BT45 so I replaced the front with a matching one. They seem to be good enough for my skill level. I just replaced the tires on Booger with Michelins. Because the two bikes are almost identical I can swap wheels and tires with very little effort so will probably try those next season as well. Perhaps eventually I will be able to notice the differences small changes like these make.

All in all, my set up is really oriented toward the very basic and practical. Won't it be great if the day ever comes that I can honestly say "I need a faster bike".

Art.
 

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My take is it is as good a bike to learn to race on as any. If you ever get to the stage you are limited by the bike, you can bore and stroke it, do the suspension and carbs and have a mighty fine racer.

On Sunday I did 8 laps of the Mosport 2.4 km driver development track. It's been 4 years since I've been on the track and I was riding solo on the course. I beat my best time in 2007 when I had a Daytona 675 by over 2 seconds and I'm pretty rusty and still feeling out my transformed 1087 bike. I have no doubt I can do much better with some more suspension setup work. I have bitubo gas cartridges and springs coming soon.
 
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