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I'm in the process of downsizing and trying to sell a couple of my vintage bikes to make room for a newer one. To those of you that have a T100, T120 Street Twin etc. What made you choose the Triumph brand over say a Moto Guzzi VIII or a BMW R9T Pure or Scrambler?
 

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Although I sold my T120, I'd own another one. The Triumph T120 is a package that's hard to beat. Great ergonomics, ride-by-wire with available cruise control, multiple ride modes etc. I personally don't like the ergos on the BMW, and the Guzzi isn't up to par technically with either of them.

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I like the classic bike looks, but not the classic bike handling and brakes and the Guzzi still have a little bit too much of that character for my taste. Also Triumph already doesn’t have as many dealers as I like and Guzzi has far far less. The Ducati Scramblers have the same problem I have with most of the Japanese retros it’s just a modern bike engine with some styling around it. Triumph have done a great job modernizing their classic power train while keeping the look. I ended up on a speed twin because I liked the performance benefits over the other classics without the committed ergos of the Thruxton. As to the BMWs I just think they are ugly (though my BMW fanboy buddy hated the Pure, but liked the other R9Ts).


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I have not ridden any of the newer, water cooled bikes, but I love the looks of the 2009-2015 Bonneville T100's and you can find plenty of them around in the $5,000-6,000 range. I get old codgers ask me all the time if mine is a restoration. Since it does not have a kickstart and it has the disk brakes, that tells you Triumph did an outstanding job evoking the bikes of the past. Easily customizable and bomb proof engines. If you're a wrencher, I'd go that way. Over the range of time, there are a ton of color schemes to look for, too.

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I have not ridden any of the newer, water cooled bikes, but I love the looks of the 2009-2015 Bonneville T100's and you can find plenty of them around in the $5,000-6,000 range. I get old codgers ask me all the time if mine is a restoration. Since it does not have a kickstart and it has the disk brakes, that tells you Triumph did an outstanding job evoking the bikes of the past. Easily customizable and bomb proof engines. If you're a wrencher, I'd go that way. Over the range of time, there are a ton of color schemes to look for, too.

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I had a 2006 Bonneville T100. I should never have sold that motorcycle. it looked amazing, road amazing, and did everything I wanted to do. The only issue I ever had with that motorcycle, was I couldn't stop anywhere without a half an hour conversation. Does it have oil in the frame? Is it still right shift? How long did it take you to restore it? Even though the newer 1200s are certainly better motorcycles, I actually liked riding my '06 better.

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I just closed a deal to trade my '17 Guzzi V7 Special for a Bonneville T120. Nut'n wrong with the Guzzi, the V-Twin motor and shaft drive are sweet. The T120 has much more power, handles far better, the OEM suspension is far better then on the Guzzi... I found the Guzzi suspension to be dangerous and upgraded it ASAP. The Guzzi fuel filter is 1/2 plastic and 1/2 metal and is prone to failure. The POS fuel filter on my V7 failed left me stranded at roadside when riding home on a fly/ride deal with only 1200 miles on the ODO. I was 1400 miles from home and 300 miles from the purchasing dealer. To their credit they came to fetch me and the V7, return us to the shop, replaced the filter with a proper all metal unit and sent me on my way. That event cost me 2 nights lodging, 2 days of meals for me and the guy tha that came to rescue me, and a 2 day delay in my schedule.

The Triumph dealer network maybe not the best but it's miles and miles better the the Guzzi network. They come and go like sunrises and support from Italy SUX. The Guzzi is a low volume boutique bike and for me required al ot of upgrade to made it handle OK, just OK. With only 52 HP it does not go like a Triumph.

A few months ago I picked up a '19 Triumph Street Twin and find it to be a far more competent and capable motorcycle then the Guzzi....and it puts a big smile on my face. The Guzzi sat gathering dust. When the Street Twin was being serviced the dealer provided me with a T120 to take to lunch. After putting about 45 miles on T120 I decided it would be a nice replacement for the Guzzi. The rest is history.

The Street Twin is a fun bike, it's light, handles great, with plenty of power and good for bending around the curves. It's my daily rider and gets ridden hard. The 'T120 will be used when I want a more relaxed ride or for short touring adventures. I have another bike I find better suited for going long.

I suggest you ride each of the bikes you're considering and decide for yourself.

Paul
 

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3Airheads, check your pm.....

Paul
 

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If you even need to ask whether you should consider a guzzi over a triumph you really need to take one for a ride... a guzzi looks good (imo) and thats where they stop... under powered compared to a triumph. Suspension sub par the triumph feels like a much more refined and premium bike in all aspects.

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Discussion Starter #9
I've ridden the Street Twin,the T100 and the T120. I've also ridden my son's 2014 Triumph Scrambler. I've ridden some Guzzi's at a factory demo ride, probably 10 years ago. anyway of the Triumphs I wanted to like the Street Twin the bests I like the looks and sound of the bike. The seat was too low for meant a comfortable ride. My favorite was the T100.It just felt right when I sat on that one. I liked it better than the T120.
 

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If you even need to ask whether you should consider a guzzi over a triumph you really need to take one for a ride... a guzzi looks good (imo) and thats where they stop... under powered compared to a triumph. Suspension sub par the triumph feels like a much more refined and premium bike in all aspects.

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When I select a bike it’s not solely based on the numbers, if that were the case I’d be riding Duciati panigale. For me the key factor is an emotional one. It’s simple, the more it makes me smile the more likely I’ll make it mine.

The v-twin of the Guzzi V7 gen III is a very nice motor and with the recent upgrades highly refine. A basic truth is a air cooled V-twins and flat twins have a different exhaust note and different performance characteristics then a water cooled parallel twin. I see it as one is better then the other... just different.

I also take exception that the Triump is more premium, it sure what you mean by that. Fit & finish on the V7 gen III is at least on par with what Triump has to offer. That how I see it and I currently have each sitting side by side in my garage.

Paul
 

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I'm in the process of downsizing and trying to sell a couple of my vintage bikes to make room for a newer one. To those of you that have a T100, T120 Street Twin etc. What made you choose the Triumph brand over say a Moto Guzzi VIII or a BMW R9T Pure or Scrambler?
Also have a look at the triumph Speed Twin, alongside the bonneville, it's a little more alive but still a sit up and beg riding position. Lots of accessories available to make it what you want it to be. I ride a Thruxton r, but the riding position on my bike is a little more tilted forward than the Speed twin.
 

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Partly riding position - I need to be as upright as I can be (car crash years ago did for my neck) and I like a low seat (despite being 5'10" I've got a 28" inside leg).

Guzzi was too tall, R9T and Ducati Scrambler were too lean forward.

Biggest reason though was that the Street Scrambler was the one bike where I stopped thinking about power and suspension and brakes and steering and handling and rider modes and realised I was purely and simply enjoying the ride. Easy as that. It put a smile on my face like no bike has done since I rode a BSA Bantam when I was 17.

I stopped chasing power and sophistication and all of a sudden the scenery became something to appreciate as I rode peacefully through it, rather than the stuff at the side of the road that I was trying hard not to hit.
 

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When I select a bike it’s not solely based on the numbers, if that were the case I’d be riding Duciati panigale. For me the key factor is an emotional one. It’s simple, the more it makes me smile the more likely I’ll make it mine.

The v-twin of the Guzzi V7 gen III is a very nice motor and with the recent upgrades highly refine. A basic truth is a air cooled V-twins and flat twins have a different exhaust note and different performance characteristics then a water cooled parallel twin. I see it as one is better then the other... just different.

I also take exception that the Triump is more premium, it sure what you mean by that. Fit & finish on the V7 gen III is at least on par with what Triump has to offer. That how I see it and I currently have each sitting side by side in my garage.

Paul
I dont buy a bike based on numbers either. Like i said, take it for a ride....i have ridden guzzis before. They do not feel any where near as nice as a triumph to ride.
And why we are at it.... lets make comments like if i were after just numbers i would buy a panigale..... we are talking modern classics here. If i were chasing numbers i sure as hell wouldnt be riding my thruxton... not super sports. So comparing modern classics it would be prudent to take into account the HP and NM numbers...
Yes visually the guzzi looks every part "premium" as the triumph.. i found when i rode one it didnt feel as premuim or nice to ride. The engine, the suspension, the wheels.. everything.




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I'm in the process of downsizing and trying to sell a couple of my vintage bikes to make room for a newer one. To those of you that have a T100, T120 Street Twin etc. What made you choose the Triumph brand over say a Moto Guzzi VIII or a BMW R9T Pure or Scrambler?
I had been reading about the new Triumphs since they first reentered the market. I had a few bikes already that I enjoyed and didnt want to sell one just to buy another. So the years passed---and finally in 2010 I saw a 2008 Thruxton advertised for sale and made an offer and got it. No comparison to the older Triumphs I've owned in the past. It was smooth---fast and no oil leaks. Long story short...I went on to add a Thunderbird Sport and now a 2018 T120 1200cc. The T120 is the best by far . I have sold the TBS...and getting the Thruxton ready to sell soon. If I get another bike , it will probably be a Thunderbird 1700. Mainly for 2 up riding.
I have a BMW R1150RS and a Norton 850 plus a Ducati 750 as well as the Triumphs.
The reason I chose a Triumph was the fact I only heard good reviews for them. And I liked the look of the bike. You'll not be disappointed. Do find a dealer who will let you take a test ride on several different models. They each have their own personality...
 

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I really liked the Ducati scramblers on paper. And pending a test ride was almost sold. The 2019 cafe racer version looked sweat and the stats where all good. They added a hydro clutch lever which was good as 2018 was hard on the hand even on a short test ride. Problem was it had the turning circle of a semi trailer and was a pig at low speed for a small bike. And the heat radiating up was terrible compared to other air cooled bikes.
finish was a let down as well. The 1100 wasn’t much better. Was nice going straight but that’s where it ended.

The speed twin is probably one of the best all rounders out there ATM. Especially if your height challenged. Great to commute on, happy to be pushed on twistys. Plenty of modern features but retains a classic look and lines. throw on some duel purpose tyres and I’m sure it would be fine on some gravels roads as well. Seen a lot of speed twins in India rocking dual purpose tread and handling some rocky rough terrain.

iv had 150hp bikes, and although the ST dosnt have the same urge it still has enough to feel like you could get yourself into trouble. It’s a must test ride.
 

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I was specifically looking for a scrambler. I test rode the R Nine-T Scrambler (I owned another Beemer at the time) and didn't like it at all (way too much vibration for my liking – so disappointing!). The Ducati Scramblers are a bit small and I also wanted something I could do a bit of touring on. The Guzzi just didn't quite fit my tastes and I often read about issues of banging knees on the heads. I'd always liked the Triumph modern classics and the new water cooled models had great reviews. I test-rode one and went for it. Yes, I found the power was a little down from what I was used to, but it's fast enough with plenty of real world fun without having to be super-fast (which I'm not). I agree with the reviews that say they're somehow much more than what the on-paper numbers suggest they should be...
 

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I dont buy a bike based on numbers either. Like i said, take it for a ride....i have ridden guzzis before. They do not feel any where near as nice as a triumph to ride.
And why we are at it.... lets make comments like if i were after just numbers i would buy a panigale..... we are talking modern classics here. If i were chasing numbers i sure as hell wouldnt be riding my thruxton... not super sports. So comparing modern classics it would be prudent to take into account the HP and NM numbers...
Yes visually the guzzi looks every part "premium" as the triumph.. i found when i rode one it didnt feel as premuim or nice to ride. The engine, the suspension, the wheels.. everything.




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I'm not shure what 'feels premium' mean???

My Guzzi V7 Special has beautiful high quality, light weight alloy spoke wheels, the spoke wheel on a Triumph are steel, heavy, and prone to corrosion in wet climates. The chromed steel wheels on my '09 Triumph Scrambler became pitted after only three years here in SW Florida and it was always garaged. I've read several reports from the Brit's of the same on their bike, not an uncommon issue. On almost every bike I own recently, except the BMW R1200R & GSA, has updated suspension. The '19 Street Twin has Fox shocks.... wish I had gone with the Wilbers as I did on the Guzzi. I do agree the OEM suspension on my Street Twin is a bit more controlled and comfortable ride then the OEM suspension on the Guzzi. The Guzzi has an air cooled V-Twin, the classic Triumphs has a liquid cooled parallel twin. One is no more premium then the other, but they are very different in in the way they deliver power/ torque and the haptic feed back they provide to the rider.

I'm no fanboy of any brand of motorcycle. I'm a motorcycle enthusiast and believe I can be objective wiith out bias toward any brand.
As I see it no bike is perfect but the Guzzi and the Triumph are very nice bike each with it's strengths and weaknesses.

Paul
 

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I've got a Triumph and a Guzzi sitting in the garage (Scrambler XE and Stelvio) and the Guzzi is a fantastic piece of kit. If you're thinking of working on it yourself, the Guzzi is the easiest bike I've ever owned for servicing and having a shaft drive is brill. I got the Scrambler as a second bike because I really missed my old 06 Scrambler. Now the XE's nothing like that, but it is fun and has more than enough power. I've been thinking of trading in the Stelvio recently, not because there's anything wrong with it, but I've had it for 7 years and it is a heavy old bus to move around in the garage. I'm genuinely torn between the Tiger 900 and V85TT. I know that they're completely different bikes and I'm sure that the Tiger's probably 'better' in most respects to the V85, but there's something about Guzzis that really speaks to my soul.
When I got my first Triumph years ago (95 Daytona 900), I really thought I'd got something special. That name on the tank, the history, the fact that there weren't that many on the road - I loved all that. But somehow, the new Triumphs don't do that for me anymore. They're good bikes, but for me there's something hard to define that's missing. I find that something with the Guzzis, whether you want to call it charm, character or something else, I just feel like I'd be missing something if I didn't have a Guzzi as an option.
My daughter wants me to get an MV Agusta Turismo Veloce, but she's got spendy tastes, isn't paying for it and isn't as tall as me :) Mind you, an MV could be fun.....
 

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I'm in the process of downsizing and trying to sell a couple of my vintage bikes to make room for a newer one. To those of you that have a T100, T120 Street Twin etc. What made you choose the Triumph brand over say a Moto Guzzi VIII or a BMW R9T Pure or Scrambler?
The T100 was the only possible choice for me. I explain why here:

 

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The T100 was the only possible choice for me. I explain why here:

A nice read.... thx for pointing in that direction.

When introduced it was a T120... and that was the choice I made last week. It's a Diamond edition.

Paul
 
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