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Hello,
I've recently found what I believe to be a 1970 Trophy 650 in near mint condition. It was sold to me as a '72 but after decoding the vin I believe it to be a 70 (Tiger?)
The carb bowl looks plugged and reddish-brown on the seal, I'm not getting fuel past the carb and unable to start it.
Where would the best place for me to purchase a carb kit and inline fuel filter. Although it's low, I do have spark, and the air filter is clean.
I am located in Canada and don't mind ordering online, but I'm not 100% certain of the year and part numbers.
Any help or suggestions is greatly appreciated.
Thanks!
718111
 

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Hi EtownJay, '70 is easy to identify. It's the only year with the bolt on front motor mount. Meaning it bolts to both frame & motor with 2 side plates. Looks like you have that. Some custom paint & chroming I see. Nice looking!! A bent peg that should straighten.
Lots of places to get part #s. First you need own parts book & workshop manual. Classic British Spares has them for free online down load as well as others. Buy or print, but you'll need paper copies to make notes on.
Regarding carb parts the online seller of your choice or ebay. The important part is genuine Amal parts in a sealed bag. Clear fuel line looks cool, but doesn't hold up over time. Use Gates (if possible) carb/evap hose. Stocked in USA & Canada.

Start by checking fuel flow from each tap. There is strainer in banjo fitting on carb. Yup that as BS/Whitworth size bolt. You need a set of BS/Whitworth combination wrenches & 3/8 drive sockets. Parts sellers or Ebay.

With Banjo removed you can inspect strainer screen in banjo & test fuel flow to banjo. Next pull bowl. Sometimes gasket can be removed. If float & needle are plastic which was from new they should not be used. Modern fuel will soften them & case big problems. Amal stayup float & alloy needle with viton tip must be used. Look over Amal web site. Remove the jet holder in carb & clean those parts. Again you'll need your new wrenches, but 8mm will pull main jet.

However if inside of carb is gummed up almost certainly the idle fuel passage will be clogged making hard starting. Can be hard to clean as it makes two 90 deg turns. Cleaning that requires carb removal for the most part.

Saying that if you can get gas to carb & it tickles after cleaning screen in banjo & needle moves freely with float you could remove mixture screw & blow carb cleaner spray into mixture screw. Blow out with air. Poke 1 strand of wire into pilot jet under the mixture screw. The hole is .017". I use 1 strand of copper wire. Just strip insulation back a few inches & cut a strand. Not so easy to get into hole, but it will. Measure wire fist obviously. Again very hard to get the crust out of this blind passage, but it will clean.

Carb slide & bore wear are problems with old carbs. Wear hear will mess up mixture at lower RPM making bike want to die & not idle correctly. If you find carb wear, don't spend $ on old carb. Get new. Generally I find best to order the correct carb from Amal. Cost effective & you specify exactly the jets, slide, banjo, top etc. you want. Don't buy generic carb as it's not what you have! New Premier Amal is different metal & internal construction. It will demand .019 idle jet, not the .017 old carb has.

Saying that I would still clean carb. Temporarily use plastic float etc. to get bike running so you can evaluate what you have. I like to get old bikes running first as you never know what you'll find.

There is a page waking the sleeping beast. Search & read it. Decide what you want to follow, but it'll give you sense of what to do.

I see you have a well equipped workshop. I assume this is yours & you can use all the tools. I expect with your skills you'll find an easy understanding of these old bikes, but they have many idiosyncrasies.

Verify spark before starting also. Old points last for years. Mine were new in 1976. Static timing check can be done if needed. That's another subject. Once running use a timing light to set timing.
Don
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Don!
I really appreciate the input and direction. I will definitely look into the information you provided. I'm hoping to get her running soon so I know where I stand with it come spring time as I hope it'll be my daily rider.
I'm pulling the carb off this weekend for a deep cleaning and hope it's not in too bad of shape. It was restored about 12 years ago and last ran about 5 years ago.
Also need to add some turn signals as it does not have any. All of the electrical works, so I'm hoping it should be an easy ad on.
Thanks again!
Jay
 

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EtownJay, Check out Baxter Cycle here in the states. They have a very complete and easy to use website. You'll find an Amal carb parts book there as well as a parts book for your model Triumph. They've been in business 40 plus years and are a Triumph dealership with new models as well as vintage bikes. Parts department is loaded with NOS, new manufacture, and used parts. I can only assume they ship parts internationally. Good looking bike, Good luck getting her on the road, keep us posted!
 

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Where in Canada do you live Jay?
Yes it is 70 TR 6 identical to my friends Steve bike.
He made it fly adapting new Monobloc to it.
As a first step check if any gas flows through mesh gas filters if your petcocks, the next one is a carb banjo.
I didn't buy any Whitworth wrenches for my carbs, just use some metric wrenches on them.
I believe 5 years of not using a bike didn't kill the carb, but cleaning of it's idle system could be difficult.
I always check it by spraying carb / part cleaner through air side and fuel side of it to make sure it's operational.
 

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EtownJay, Check out Baxter Cycle here in the states. They have a very complete and easy to use website. You'll find an Amal carb parts book there as well as a parts book for your model Triumph. They've been in business 40 plus years and are a Triumph dealership with new models as well as vintage bikes. Parts department is loaded with NOS, new manufacture, and used parts. I can only assume they ship parts internationally. Good looking bike, Good luck getting her on the road, keep us posted!
Thanks Happy! Will check them out.
Jay
 

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Where in Canada do you live Jay?
Yes it is 70 TR 6 identical to my friends Steve bike.
He made it fly adapting new Monobloc to it.
As a first step check if any gas flows through mesh gas filters if your petcocks, the next one is a carb banjo.
I didn't buy any Whitworth wrenches for my carbs, just use some metric wrenches on them.
I believe 5 years of not using a bike didn't kill the carb, but cleaning of it's idle system could be difficult.
I always check it by spraying carb / part cleaner through air side and fuel side of it to make sure it's operational.
Hey Adam,
I've pulled the lines off the carb and both lines from the tank flow evenly from the petcocks. The in line filter is clean and has no issues that I can see. It seems to stop at the carb. I'm guessing the bowl is full of rusted/gelled gas and would be the first thing to clean up before tearing the whole carb apart. When I pulled the cap off of the bottom of the bowl, I noticed some sentiment, so I'll start there. My fear is taking it all apart and not getting/finding the parts to put it back together in a timely manner. So I'll start with the basics first, then dive into the carb rebuild if the cleaning doesn't help.
Thanks for the leads and recommendations.
Jay
 

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Hey Adam,
I've pulled the lines off the carb and both lines from the tank flow evenly from the petcocks. The in line filter is clean and has no issues that I can see. It seems to stop at the carb. I'm guessing the bowl is full of rusted/gelled gas and would be the first thing to clean up before tearing the whole carb apart. When I pulled the cap off of the bottom of the bowl, I noticed some sentiment, so I'll start there. My fear is taking it all apart and not getting/finding the parts to put it back together in a timely manner. So I'll start with the basics first, then dive into the carb rebuild if the cleaning doesn't help.
Thanks for the leads and recommendations.
Jay
PS, I live in Edmonton, AB
 

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Wow, some 4 thousand km only.:).
Those Amal carbs are very simple and easy to dismantle and reassemble, only thing is you have to be very gentle with them. If anything needs force just stop and ask.
I'm quite sure your problem is clogged pilot bush buried deep in a carb body + clogged orifices under a slide, but certainly you can start from a bowl.
In my opinion the best course of action is unscrew the tank and take it off, unscrew 2 top bolts of the carb to remove top with cables, spring and slides and unscrew and remove body of the carb from a head ( removing fuel lines first from a bowl ).
Than you can remove bowl of the carb easily and have everything accessible..
 

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Wow, some 4 thousand km only.:).
Those Amal carbs are very simple and easy to dismantle and reassemble, only thing is you have to be very gentle with them. If anything needs force just stop and ask.
I'm quite sure your problem is clogged pilot bush buried deep in a carb body + clogged orifices under a slide, but certainly you can start from a bowl.
In my opinion the best course of action is unscrew the tank and take it off, unscrew 2 top bolts of the carb to remove top with cables, spring and slides and unscrew and remove body of the carb from a head ( removing fuel lines first from a bowl ).
Than you can remove bowl of the carb easily and have everything accessible..
Thanks Adam, it'll be a good weekend project. I'll keep you posted.
 

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Thanks Peg! Very happy so far. I have been wanting an older Triumph for a while and waited for this one the last few months. The grin is there and probably won't leave any time soon.
Jay
 

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Hi Jay, Every last part of your carb is easy to come by, including a new carb. I'd strongly recommend reusing your carb or a new Premier if new is needed. It will start & run perfectly with the original type carb. On an aside the air filter element is very important. Paper ones don't work well long term. I strongly recommend the original wire/gauze type. Not that costly & the original UK manufacture still makes them new. They fit & work perfectly. Many sellers don't stock them, but a web search will show very easy to come by from USA sellers. I expect Canada also. Buying in USA may be hard on your dollar. You can research that. Canada has some excellent parts sellers I've used.

A close up photo of left side of carb will allow identification of what version carb you have.

Amal made your original carb. Then in the last several years they made 2 versions of reproduction carb. Both new versions have a cross drilling. The "cheap" version still has pressed in jet, but the cross drilling makes it easier to clean idle fuel passage. At the same time they made a "premier" version. It has a removable pilot (idle) jet which makes cleaning very easy. Also the Premier has hard anodized slide which lasts very well. The non anodize cheap version wears fairly quickly as did original old ones.

I've cleaned many original Amal concentric that had dried fuel & lots of white & orange crust in carb. Cleaning best you can with carb apart & dry well. I expect you have air compressor. Dry passages well. Get a plastic container & submerge carb in white vinegar such it indeed fills idle passage with vinegar. Work vinegar in with a wire or blow with a straw while submerged. Let soak only 20 minutes. Flush with hot water. Soak again as needed. Left in vinegar too long will damage zinc. Looking at photo of cut away carb you can see the passage that is hard to clean.

Put stopper in hole at carb inlet. That's idle air passage. Put fingers over floor hole drillings in throat. Blow air into mixture screw hole & should exit into the bowl passage. Blow the other also. Use carb spray both ways many times. With some practice you'll soon see if carb spray is freely passing through bores & jet.

The fuel gets sucked up from bottom of bowl through one of the holes in bowl into the carb. The gasket must seal well here or it won't work right. Flatten bowl as needed, you may need to lower fulcrum pin for float if it now fouls gasket. Or file some flats on pin for clearance. Plastic float is non adjustable. DO NOT move seat. You'll bend ears on stayup float to set level as needed. Remember you'll discard plastic float soon.

1970 the carb is "rubber mounted" so to speak. Amal supplies o-ring to manifold in kit or with new carb. DO NOT USE IT. That ring is for insulator block only. You bike should have stepped studs & 70-9711 fat o-ring compressed to an air gap of .040-.060". I like .045". The ring is too fat for groove, but is correct. Grease carb groove to hold ring tighten nuts gently, push ring into groove as/if needed with thin screwdriver. Sounds nuts, works good. The 14-1301 nuts are thin lock nuts. Then 70-9555 cup washer & a 70-9554 square o-ring. Don't use round ring here. I find round don't hold tension properly over time. Classic British Spares Lancaster CA USA sells correct nuts, cup washers & rubbers. Many sellers don't sell correct parts. Grease the stud threads so nuts don't tear threads. The studs often come loose in manifold. Loctite them in 272 or 271 your choice. I've been using red 271 lately as 272 sometimes doesn't hold.

On cutaway carb the pressed in pilot jet is brass. The fuel comes into pointed end of jet from the bowl passageways. Air comes into the passage close to the threads. Notice a drilling near the flat end of jet just offset from jet. That is one of the holes into throat. 2nd photo is hole .017" in jet.
Don
 

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Jay -

Nice bike! Looks very complete.

I live a couple of hours from Baxter Cycle. They are really good for a lot of the little, hard to find, nuts and bolts stuff. They also have used parts if you're looking for original. I've got a lot of aftermarket parts from The Bonneville Shop in Colorado. British Cycle Supply is in Canada, but a long way from you. I haven't ordered from them, so can't recommend.

I would start with the parts and workshop manuals for your year. You may find them here or reprints on Ebay for cheap.


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1970 Triumph did not have turn signals from the factory. Where I live that means I don't need them legally but they are practically a necessity in today's trafficl
 

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Very nice project.

I have tried most of the US and Canadian suppliers, and my favourite by far is Waldridges, located in Ontario, Canada, maybe close to you. Download their catalogue, then order by phone and ask for Mike if you have any doubt, I think he is the owner and has steered me right many times. Also, Can dollar prices, and no duty in Canada. Many others have faster delivery, and way better web sites, but you are more likely to get quality (not junk) and correct parts from these guys. But I have not tried Baxters, who may also be good.

I would try to clean and rebuild the carb, but you may find like I did, that it is easier and safer to simply buy new ones. They are not too expensive, and avoid problems with modern gas, sticking sliders, clogged jets, etc.

Almost done my 1970 Bonneville, which is very similar. Despite having to take apart and put back together every component at least three times, I envy you on the start of a fantastic project like this. Keep us posted.
 

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+1 for Walrdige, Mike is great and stands by his stuff. Been dealing with him for over 20 years now and never had a problem.

Ordering online is easy but you need to have the part number (as you should have if using the correct parts maual)

I hear good things about BCS in nova scotia but never used them personally.

Enjoy the ride!
 
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