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2016 Diablo Red Thruxton 1200 R
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Theres Nothing like a pack 250cc GP 2-strokers going full throttle and wide open around a track. Small cc bikes can b a lot of fun in the twistys that’s where their advantage is to kick but on the big cc bikes until u hit the straightaways then it’s later dude...lol eventually when I wanted to have fun canyon carving I got 600 cc bikes just for that and still have my 1100’s.
I will tell u a true story. i had influenced a friend as a biker so he wanted to get one too and join the pack. he had no experience at all as a good friend I did try to convince him to start with a nice seconded bike for a little while get a little experience and he wouldn’t have to worry if he dropped the bike in the learning process then eventually Get a new bike like he wanted in the first place. I just felt responsible for inspiring him to get a bike but then I knew his parents Frowned on the bike idea and if anything happened to him I would b the blame and I couldn’t live with that so I felt responsible to give him the most sensible advice in choosing his first bike, one that hopefully wouldn’t kill himself on like a 1000cc.
I tried to talk him into buying a 600 cc to learn on and thought I had convinced him.
he calls me up saying he bought a new bike and he wanted me to ride with him so he could pick it up And I would drive his NX2000 home. He wouldn’t tell me what he bought he wanted to surprise me.
Well I was super supersized and speechless when we got to the Yamy dealership and he had purchased a brand new R1. Since most of us had 1100‘s he wanted to hang with the big boys so he got the R1. I am telling u he barley knew how to use the throttle and clutch, a total fng...lol Got in his car, he got on the bike he pulls out the driveway and it’s red light right at the corner I am behind him the light turns green he stalls out the bike at the light, panics trying to get it started as everyone is waiting at the intersection, it starts he panics let’s the clutch out to quick and whisky throttles and the bike launches into a wheelie almost loops it some how didn’t rode a wheelie for a for about 200 yrd puts the front end down hard gets a tank slapper keeps it up until he could pull over.
omg I couldn’t believe what I just witnessed and he had luck and the lord on his side that day.
It didn’t take long for him to figure out that he was more a import racer guy then a biker so he sold the bike and stuck with the imports and lived to tell the story of his short lived biker days.
u got a world of well great awesome most knowledgeable advice here from all the post and expierianced members above, so my one piece of advice is ” RESPECT THE THROTTLE, RESPECT THE POWER“.....FTG
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If you were a friend that I was sitting and having a beer with, I would strongly recommend sticking with the smaller bike. You have almost zero seat time, so you don't yet have muscle memory going for you for control operation yet. You likely haven't had that moment where you come to the top of a driveway and realize that there is lots of gravel there when you put your foot down, or went to put the bike on it's side stand only to realize that the incline is steeper than you thought and your angle is bad. All things that will happen, easier to recover from on a small bike, and easier to live with if something bad happens but the bike wasn't your keeper.
But more importantly, people that train longer on smaller bikes end up being better riders. Everyone that jumps in with "I started with a Rocket 3...", well, for every one of those people that were natural athletes and end up being great riders, there are 5 that you don't hear from because they quit riding, and 5 more that are barely able to putter to the pub and back.
That's just my opinion, but it's based on 45 years of riding, with lot's of friends that used to ride.
 

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I switched from my first bike in 4 months.... but then again, I did 4000 miles in those 4 months. In hindsight, I should have kept riding that bike longer and tried more variety of riding, like trips to decide which bike would be right for me next. I mostly used it for commuting to NYC.

Now nearly 25 years later, I have multiple bikes that I use for different purposes. Camping on a motorcycle is one of my favorite type of trips. I’ve done that on standard type bikes, adventure and even sport bikes. Any bike can work, but this early in your motorcycling journey, I would suggest that you get proficient in a variety of situations and then think about what type of riding you like before you change bikes.


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