Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Yo!
I've been tormenting myself (as many of us bikers do) about whether to swap the TBS wheels.

I was drawn to the 3-spoke Daytona/SP3 that Stunta has for example, and then I thought they looked too modern.
Then I took a shining to the TRident ones. Modern, yes, but with a pretty 6 spoke design. Still allows for 4 pot caliper upgrades,etc. I didn't like the 18" rear wheel, which limits the tyre choice a bit, although there's still plenty of sport touring to choose from.

In the end, I thought, "sod this, just stick with the originals, ride the bike a bit and then make a decison".

So, I wrote back to the breaker and said I'd put the project on hold. I don't know what it is. It must be the look of the wire spokes I like or something. As for upgrades, I'm gonna put in HH pads and see how it goes. :cool:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
991 Posts
I made that same choice some time ago....

Nothing against those that have upgraded to tubeless rims...
I just like the look of spokes on the TBS. (even though I hate cleaning them)

(it is a personal choice)

.

[ This message was edited by: zimtok on 2006-12-08 07:31 ]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
It got to the stage that when ever i met someone i knew they said " Bike could do with a clean".
You spend hours cleaning the back wheel, two seconds after you go for a spin, its black again!

I picked up some Trophy wheels, 17"black three spoke, on Ebay for £10.00. It cost £15.00 for delivery! Stripped off the paint and polished the alloy. Now i have cleanable wheels that look good and have 180/55 rubber on the back.

I still have the original TBird spoked wheels just in case i feel like going retro again.

Oh, and the alloys are lighter. Less weight=more speed :-D





 

·
Registered
Joined
·
239 Posts
If you have ever had a flat in the back country where the only thing you can do with your cell phone is throw it at a squirrel then you will understand why some of us are clammering to change our wheels to tubeless. I determined it was so expensive and/or complicated, at least for me, that I took the plunge and bought a bike with tubeless rims to ride the back country. I wanted another bike anyway and this was the excuse that I used. Now I have a great Trophy that won't strand me. At least not with a difficult to fix flat. just a thought.
Flybiker :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,260 Posts
LOL what's funny is that the only accessories I bought for my TBS were Naploeans and the solo seat until I picked up a nail in the middle of nowhere late on a Sunday night. So I started with the wheels and well...it all went downhill from there. Not that I'm complaining mind you. :-D

One other thing to think about, in California "Wheel Works" will seal your spoked wheels which means you can ditch the tubes. I haven't heard any first hand reports of how they have held up but that seems like the best of both worlds. Well its either that or you plunk down 2k for a set of Dymag carbon fiber spoked wheels. There may be a service like that near you, or you could just get someone to weld an innerbarrier to your wheels that would seal them as well.



[ This message was edited by: TBSstunta on 2006-12-08 11:07 ]
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,646 Posts
Me- I just wanted to be able to ride harder and stop faster

:-D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Oh no, don't tell me that the tyres have an inner tube?
What's all that about, then?

At the same time, if I get a puncture I get a puncture. I'm not thinking of touring on the TBS anyway.

But getting them sealed seems like a sensible idea. I'll around here in Barcelona. Why do Triumph have to complicate things? Now I understand the wheel change better.

So, what do you think of the 18"-17" Trident wheels then?

Not tubeless. But why...? :???:

[ This message was edited by: senyorsimon on 2006-12-09 09:19 ]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
572 Posts
you could just get someone to weld an innerbarrier to your wheels that would seal them as well.
I think this is the most retarded idea I have heard of in a while. Welding up the rim on the inside like that will ruin it! On aluminium rims it will warp the rims beyond ever being usable not to mention the weld would have to be perfect and I mean PERFECT or it will not seal! Welding aluminium is not easy. On steel rims it will warp as well although not as bad, probably enough to make it wobble like hell. You also would ruin the chrome, and how would you rechrome it when you cannot remove the nipples from the wheel. How would you replace one of the nipples if it got stripped out or damaged in some way? What about all the weight you would add, you call this a performance upgrade? Very, very bad idea. If you're going to give advice stick to something you know about.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I have to admit that the comments here have made me think about the inner tube/tubeless issue and the blowout danger(had one once). I just don't like the 3-spoke alloys on the TBS, but I might go for the Trident ones later on, but only because of the safety issue. I dunno...

So, I buy the TBS and find out it ain't tubeless, next people'll be telling me it's not fuel-injected.
:hammer:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,260 Posts
On 2006-12-09 12:12, meanchuck wrote:
I think this is the most retarded idea I have heard of in a while. Welding up the rim on the inside like that will ruin it! On aluminium rims it will warp the rims beyond ever being usable not to mention the weld would have to be perfect and I mean PERFECT or it will not seal! Welding aluminium is not easy. On steel rims it will warp as well although not as bad, probably enough to make it wobble like hell. You also would ruin the chrome, and how would you rechrome it when you cannot remove the nipples from the wheel. How would you replace one of the nipples if it got stripped out or damaged in some way? What about all the weight you would add, you call this a performance upgrade? Very, very bad idea. If you're going to give advice stick to something you know about.
Wow, someone piss in your coffee this morning?

Rechrome? Not everyone cares about chrome. Obviously since he is considering Trident wheels chrome isnt the most important thing in his book.

Warped aluminum? On the 2004 they are steel not aluminum like the wheels on your 98 (Didn't you say something about sticking to things you know about?)

Weight? Get real, our bikes weigh 480#s on a good day. Besides, exactly how heavy do you think a thin piece of metal is?

Never said anything about a performance upgrade, that's what dymag 3-spokes or cf spoked are.

I just threw that suggestion out along with others, its up to him to decide which avenue he wants to follow.

[ This message was edited by: TBSstunta on 2006-12-10 13:27 ]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
572 Posts
When someone gives people advice that will RUIN THEIR BIKES COMPONENTS, yes I get pissed. I realize that my rims are aluminum and his are steel I explained it that way because this thread is being read by people that have both. If I thought his rims were polished aluminum as mine are, why would I mention steel wheels and chrome? You may not care about chrome and he might not care about chrome but someone who reads this will, I just like to cover all the bases. As far as performance, making two continuous welds around the circumference of the wheel plus the strip of metal will easy add at least a pound or two (especially on steel). Read a physics book, adding weight on a spinning object will increase is gyroscopic effect. The further you get from the axis the more it increases. The more gyroscopic effect you have the harder it is to turn into a corner. Adding a couple of stationary pounds to the bike is one thing, but adding it to largest spinning parts of your bike is another. Ever have a wheel out of balance? Usually it is only a few ounces that can ruin the handling of an otherwise good handling bike. What do you think happens when you throw a couple of pounds into the mix? Also adding that weight increases inertia which decreases acceleration and braking. One of the advantages to the Wheel Works rim sealant is that without tube your wheel/tire combo is lighter, and that is just an inner tube! If you want to throw suggestions out there that will cost people a lot of money, make their good handling bikes handle like ***** and make perfectly good (and expensive) rims into useless pieces of s***** metal, be my guest, I mean it's not your bike or your money why should you care? I'd rather for help people IMPROVE their bikes. I'm hope what ever avenue he follows isn't one WILL RUIN HIS BIKE. Like I said stick to what you know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,260 Posts
My comments were specifically about senyorsimon's bike so I didn't feel the need to add, "This comment does not apply to every single Thunderbird, only the 2000+ TBS which have 17" steel wheels and dual, twin-piston brakes up front". I've noticed you don't add similar disclaimers to any of your posts so don't rail on me for that. Stuff like this is the reason why there are instructions on shampoo.

Yes the wheels are lighter without the tubes, but how much does that sealant weigh? So its ok for the sealant to add weight but not another solution? You didnt get upset about the sealant adding weight, double-standards much? Both solutions will add weight to the wheel and there are negative consequences to doing that, as you pointed out. You want to add more information.

One other possible solution that I mulled over, but didnt research further, would be to adapt a BMW wheel. There was a version of the R1100R that had 17" wheels. If the spoke count matches its possible to lace those rims to you hubs. BMW (and Aprilia) run the spokes to the edge of the wheel outside of the bead of the tire. That way the wheels are sealed. Geeee...I hope no one is upset that I didn't put a disclaimer after that. LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
572 Posts
Man what a crybaby! Did mommy take your blankey away from you? You really put a lot of effort into proving yourself wrong! Read the article I provided. The entire wheel + sealant + tubeless rim is lighter than the wheel + tube tire + tube (did I mention stick to what you know). Is this good enough or do you need pie charts and bar graphs to help explain something you think you know about but will not even read about! A lot of people read these threads to get info or ideas about modifying their bikes, myself included. Regardless who it is directed to REALLY BAD information is still REALLY BAD information. It is now obvious you only want senyorsimon to ruin his rims not everyone. At least he knows you care. I doubt any of this will sink in to your overly thick skull but I tried. I guess some people are just to arrogant and ignorant to accept that any person knows more than them. Before you say I fall into this category let me remind you that you have yet to prove me wrong on anything I have said. I welcome anyone that will prove me wrong on anything I have said because I am no genius and if I am wrong I would like to learn what is right. Learning is good. That is how I obtained the little bit of knowledge that my hillbilly brain can store.

BTW I liked the BMW rim comment though, I always love to see someone make a last ditch effort to seem intelligent when they are proven wrong over and over.


[ This message was edited by: meanchuck on 2006-12-10 16:21 ]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,260 Posts
On 2006-12-10 15:57, meanchuck wrote:
The entire wheel + sealant + tubeless rim
If you are going to pull a holier-than-thou attitued, you might want to double-check what you post first. The tubeless rim is part of the wheel so its entire wheel + sealant.

I only mentioned the BMW thing as a possibility which I hadn't researched further than a passing curiosity. I'm honestly curious whether, if the BMW rims use the same number of spokes, you could lace them up to the Triumph hubs.

I'll admit I'm wrong once you post some hard facts that steel wheels will warp when adding a very thin inner wall. Anyway this is going nowhere, we both think the other is being a baby so its best to let it drop. Feel free to insult me just to get the last word in though. :-D

PS. Senyorsimon, just so you know, I hold no ill will towards you or your wheels.

[ This message was edited by: TBSstunta on 2006-12-10 17:07 ]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
572 Posts
I'm sorry!! I meant "tire" instead of "rim". You proved I'm an idiot!! You can go to bed feeling great about yourself. I think you got the holier-than-thou thing backwards, that's all you. For me it's a matter of right and wrong and principals. Do you even care that you are giving horrible advice?!? Does this make any sense to you at all that what you are suggesting will really screw up their bike?!? You keep trying to prove that anything in that original statement was even remotely true and try skirt the issue to try to make me look bad. Grow up man. You will admit being wrong when I post some facts about welding? Yeah right!! You won't even admit being wrong when you think the laws of physics do not matter! Ask a bunch of certified welders. I'm done wasting my time with someone as immature as you. All I have done is present TRUE facts all you have done is argue about things you cannot comprehend. I am just trying to keep people from making a very costly mistake, all you seem to care about is looking good on this forum. Are you even man enough to admit you know absolutely nothing about the advice you gave?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,797 Posts
I mean it's not your bike or your money why should you care?
Learning is good. That is how I obtained the little bit of knowledge that my hillbilly brain can store.
The next lesson will be on 'HUMILITY'

I sometimes wonder how people manage to ride.

 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top