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Discussion Starter #1
Can a stock T120 do a wheelie? I’ve been going through first and second wide open and I can’t get the front wheel anywhere near leaving the ground.


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First - would have to say stay safe...please...
Second - I do not wheelie on my Thruxton...
Third - but if I did...I would need to make sure the traction control was off...not sure if the 120 has traction control...but if It does...it will surely prevent wheelies...
Forth - be safe


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Discussion Starter #3
First - would have to say stay safe...
Second - I do not wheelie on my Thruxton...
Third - but if I did...I would need to make sure the traction control was off...not sure if the 120 has traction control...but if I does...it will surely prevent wheelies...
Forth - be safe


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Honestly, I’m just baffled where others have said it’s possible. The bike doesn’t seem like it’s powerful enough to pop a wheelie. Then again, ive never tried to wheelie on anything other than a bicycle.

Thanks for the info and trust me it’s not like I’m wanting to do wheelies. I’m just curious as I’ve seen other posts saying they can wheelie easily.


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My 2018 T120 will pull the front wheel off the ground in 1st gear with pure acceleration alone (no rev and pop the clutch). The traction control has to be turned off, though, and I’m not talking a license plate dragger kind of wheel stand. I’m talking around a 2-foot high acceleration wheelie that sits back down during the 1st-2nd gear change.

I’m sure my bike is quite capable of dragging the license plate, but I outgrew that childish behavior years ago.

Pete
 

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The bike has a boatload of low end torque. It wheelies with ease. Even with the traction control on, you can get the front end off the deck quite easily. If you take the traction control off, you could be a stunt rider.

I don't do any of that myself, but I have found that when I accelerate hard from a stop, it is hard to keep the front wheel down.
 

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You can wheelie a bicycle. You can wheelie a 5hp 50cc vespa. Literally anything can be wheelied. This bike has 80hp and 180ft/lb of torque. Turn off the traction control, pop the clutch, itll come up.



If your asking if it can do a power wheelie... yeah probably. This bike is "underpowered" for a 1200cc engine, not in the realm of bikes in general. Keep in mind you got a bunch of safety systems designed specifically to prevent lifting the front wheel off the ground. Turn off what you can and crack the throttle in first. Dont be surprised if the thing flips on you.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The bike has a boatload of low end torque. It wheelies with ease. Even with the traction control on, you can get the front end off the deck quite easily. If you take the traction control off, you could be a stunt rider.

I don't do any of that myself, but I have found that when I accelerate hard from a stop, it is hard to keep the front wheel down.


So how exactly can you get the front wheel up on a T120 with the traction control on? If I start going slow in first and just open up the throttle full tilt, I don’t feel like I’m anywhere near a wheelie. I’m seriously starting to think something is wrong with the bike. Like it’s lost power or something.....


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You can wheelie a bicycle. You can wheelie a 5hp 50cc vespa. Literally anything can be wheelied.


If that's you Ranjith, that pic should be your avatar.:D
 

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Wheelies are less about power and more about weight transfer. Powerful bikes can force that weight transfer with their motor, but less powerful bikes tend to be lighter, and therefore need less oomph to lift the front. If you want to lift the front end off the ground in a bike that has rear suspension (i.e. not a cheaper bicycle) you'll probably want to load the suspension first otherwise the attempt to wheelie will result in the majority of the force being used to compress the suspension. The "clutch-up" method has this sort of built in. You can look it up on YouTube if you're interested in how to actually do it, but basically it achieves loading of the suspension and shortly after applies sudden torque at the rear wheel. Since the suspension is already compressed, the bike begins to rotate about and axis centered on the rear axle.
 

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So how exactly can you get the front wheel up on a T120 with the traction control on? If I start going slow in first and just open up the throttle full tilt, I don’t feel like I’m anywhere near a wheelie. I’m seriously starting to think something is wrong with the bike. Like it’s lost power or something.....


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Traction control and wheelies are separate things. To wheelie, the front wheel rises, it doesn't have to actually spin much faster than normal acceleration, just a portion of one revolution for a short period to lift the bike. People doing wheelies usually aren't leaving smoke or black lines behind their bikes. Traction control monitors the ABS system and detects wheelspin in a similar manner as the way it detects wheel lock when you brake too hard.
 

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It would appear that what's really required...is to be Australian.

A Wheel(ie) Review

Using the clutch you can wheelie just about anything ;) He was referring to power wheelies. Its possible on the T120, but you really need to want it. On my 1200 XE, it power wheelies easy in 2nd gear at 3500rpm with a full tank of gas. I don't know exactly what they changed in the engine from the T120, but it feels more raw and torquy (even if the T120 is by no means low on torque).
 

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I've 12 o'clocked mine a few times. It's definitely easier with a larger sprocket. I don't do it much though, because it's pretty bad for the forks.
 

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I've mistakenly had the front end rise a couple of times when trying to take off at lights too fast.
I was trying to make sure I got a quick start to get ahead of people, but didn't get a proper clutch-throttle combo, which caused the front end to rise. This is very easy to do.

If the TC is on, it will kick in after the front wheel goes up. So, you should be able to get the front wheel off the ground with it on. However, you won't be able to get it stay there unless you have the TC off.
 
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