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Hello All!

While not posting much at all, I have been enjoying this forum since getting my new 2009 Bonnie SE late last year. And what a blast it has been!

My dad & I recently came back from a fun trip riding in and around Gatlinberg, TN through the Smokey Mountains, Blue Ridge Parkway, Deals Gap, and many more. Upon return, my Bonnie got me to thinking about where the bike's history has been, is currently, and furthermore, where it's going.

Being in the automobile business, I've seen many "heritage inspired" vehicles come and go. Some with better luck than others. But the Bonneville has a charm, I believe, that is hard to resist. It's nimble, quick, comfortable, and a well laid out standard.

As some automobiles have found out, (the New Beetle, Mini, Camaro, Mustang, Challenger, & Thunderbird come to mind) once you go the retro route, it can be difficult to find the next logical step to take the brand.

After putting nearly 900 more miles on my Bonnie during our trip, I found myself asking what should/can Triumph do to improve this bike to encourage me to purchase a new one a few years down to road?

Increase power? New(er) design? Upgraded suspension?

What would you like to see Triumph do in the coming years to entice to you move into a new Bonneville?
 

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They could do worse than take a look at some of the modified machines on this forum. plenty to inform the Triumph design team of various ways and directions to take the Bonnie and other twins.
 

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Really really good question, ST8, and Nicwiz is right too. The Bonneville line is at a great price point. It's going to be tough to modify it much. I'd like to see it lose some weight (because I can't seem to get below 185).

But now that I write this, I love what they did to the new Norton. Something like that might be good direction.
 

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Unfortunately, they wont entice me to a "New" Bonneville, because I don't intend to get rid of my "Old" 2004 Bonneville ;)

Triumph provided the canvas, I provided the colour palette,
 

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There may be room to expand the model line without loosing the current great bike and price point. Keep the great bike at the great price, but offer a $12,000 model with the hot engine, suspension, seat, exhaust...

Why does Triumph let the aftermarket suppliers sell so much stuff. I like it, but some may want to buy from a dealer. Keep it simple.
 

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At the very least they should make the Thruxton package perform as well as it looks, bigger displacement, better suspension, dual discs up front, more like the Norton. They could still undersell the Commando by thousands. And a Scrambler that can actually go offroad, more ground clearance, again better suspension, and move that underslung rear break up top would be nice.

an overdrive 6th gear for highway.
 

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It wouldn't be improving the Bonneville, but I'd like to see the Trident brought back. I'd go for that and keep the Bonnie, too.

Karl
 

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At the very least they should make the Thruxton package perform as well as it looks, bigger displacement, better suspension, dual discs up front, more like the Norton. They could still undersell the Commando by thousands.
my thoughts too, e.g a Thruxton R. They should be able to uprate the suspension and some other nice touches witout the price going thru the roof.
Then have some "performance shop" option like Harley and Victory
to sell 904 kitted bikes with factory warranty.
Now if they could make it emmissions and noise compliant without killing all the HP... (But apparently, Ducati is able to with their air cooled models...:confused:)
 

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That would be easy to do. Raid the parts bin. Street triple fors wider rear end etc.

Also I think they could make a range of injection moulded aftermarket tanks for the Thruxton to cafe it up a bit.
 

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I'm fairly happy with my Thruxton Bonneville, although if it weighed 25% less, then i would be confidently happy, no more falling over.

I'm still pi$$ed about having to buy a centre stand FFS, i'll never understand why they arent fitted as standard, the Meriden models were.
I don't sit happily with that little bit of "are Triumph taking the pi$$", in the back of my mind, if i'm going to shell out my hard-earned money on a bike, i don't expect to have to spend more on "accessories" that should already be factory fitted.

The horrible plastic rear light and indicators also get a big thumbs down from me, is that why Triumph's are relatively cheap?, is it down to cost-cutting?
I would rather pay a bit extra and have the bike with decent parts fitted as standard, such as the centre stand, plus the "retro" bikes such as the Bonnie and Thruxton models, should stay true to their heritage and have the lucas style rear light and indicators fitted, like they were in the day, the standard plastic ones seem to have a slight nod towards the Harley style, with comic overtones.

Other than all that, it's fine and dandy.

G ; )
 

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+ 1s to
dual disks up front - and the Thruxton R idea with USD forks, Hotter cams, losing the Star Trek rear nacelles. Speaking of Star trek, +1 to warp factor 6 for more relaxed high speed cruise. More adjustable suspension and a wider rear tyre wouldn't hurt an R model either.

Having said all that, I've had a ball modding mine so far - I like the comment about these machines making for a great canvas. When I rode sportsbikes there were tonnes of mods you could do, but you always ended up with a soon to be dated and very samey bike at the end of it. I had a pretty tastefully modded late model CBR, but no one ever gave it a second glance. I am really surprised how many comments I get on the thrux, and it's gratifying when people spot all the 'little things' youve done to make it your own.
 

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There is great fun in making it your own. However, from a business standpoint, Triumph is not capturing much of the highly lucrative accessory business.

Also, morally/environmentally I hate having a bunch of almost new parts hanging around my garage. I now have exhaust, air box, rear shocks, tail light assembly and directionals in boxes. If Triumph shipped stripped bikes to dealers and allowed customers to "build" there bikes for delivery, it would be great.

Another option that small aircraft manufactures are doing is selling "Kits." in other words you could buy the bike composed of the component parts you wanted and assemble it yourself. They wouldn't warrantee the bike, but they could warrantee the engine, transmission, ie. The components. I think this would be a very cool idea.

Also, if they want to expand the market they should deploy this component part idea as a "Father & Son" starter bike. Say a 250 cc that fathers and sons could assemble together. This idea could save the world (I'm 1/2 serious here).

Anyway, quack, quack, quack
 

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Much better fuel economy. But that goes for most bikes. I'm still baffled about WHY can BMW make >1000kg cars with better fuel economy than my bike? the new Royal Enfields make over 100mpg, my Monkeybike makes somewhere in the region of 170mpg. Ok, performance is of course a lot lower, but I'm sure if they put a bit of R&D into fuel economy, it wouldn't hurt so much every time I fill the tank.

Oh, yes, and a stock centre-stand, underseat storage, about 50kg less weight, and I want to be able to do 180mph.
 

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My Bonny SE-R would include:

1. 6th gear.
2. Wider wheels to accept a wide variety of Sport Touring tires.
3. Upgraded shocks, fork, and a fork brace.
4. Arrows pipe with tune.
5. Improved breathing.
6. Upgraded brakes, dual front rotor Bremos.

Dream on, broomstick cowboy...
 

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It wouldn't be improving the Bonneville, but I'd like to see the Trident brought back. I'd go for that and keep the Bonnie, too.

Karl
+1 and in the style of the T160
 

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I'd like to see:
  • Twin discs
  • 6th gear
  • Option to have adjustable/thicker seat for non-shorties
  • Centre stand (criminal omission on a road bike)
  • Stainless fasteners throughout
  • Engine lacquer that doesn't peel off
  • Stainless exhaust system
  • Spoked wheels suitable for tubeless tyres
  • An extra 10-15 bhp.
Other manufacturers manage all of these. For me, these are all a sign of penny-pinching, and a bit of a disappointment. Still love the bike, though.
 

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Quite simply the following:

Bigger tank (to be able to get 200miles +)
A Fuel gauge
A Clock
6th Gear
ABS
 
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