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S'up forum? I noticed with wrenching, the manual recommends certain torque settings. I was wondering what brand/model torque wrench you all use, and how much you paid for it (if you can remember).

Thanks!
 

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i'm shopping for the same thing... gotta be careful out there. i almost got the craftsman digital torque adapter thingy:

http://www.4wheeloffroad.com/techar...man_electronic_rotary_torque_meter/index.html

but it's so bulky that i read it can barely be used on motorcycles, except for whatever hardware is most easily accessible.

then i researched craftsman's digitork, which is actually not digital, as i understand it - and i hear they break easily and don't have the lifetime warranty that other craftsman tools do.

i'm afraid that if i want a good torque wrench that's built to last, i'm gonna have to shell out some serious grip for a snap on or blue point or mac or something... hope not. i'm all ears, if anyone's got some suggestions.

~m
 

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I got Snap-on taste and a Craftsman budget!

I went to the Lowes about ½ mile from the house. I bought a 3/8" drive torque wrench for about $80.00 with tax. I got a couple of gift cards for Christmas that covered it. Lifetime warranty.

Their tools are nice enough for the weekend warrior. Pro mechs would scoff. Unfortunately, not made in the USA, but neither is Craftsman anymore. Sad.

Watch out for the really cheap torque wrenches. Torque settings are something you don't want to get wrong!

Good luck,

Joel
 

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I use the Craftsman 3/8-inch clicker, and the 1/2-inch for the big ones. If you're on a budget, get the smaller one because it's easy to overtighten the smaller screws, and you'll use it much more than the larger one. They are incremented in NM in addition to US units.

The Lowe's Kobalt line of tools look similar and are priced in the same range, makes me wonder if they come out of the same factory.

These tools are reasonably-priced and I assume good enough for the weekend mechanic. I see that they're on sale right now. I also see that Sears now has a pricier line of torque wrenches, I suppose they're an improvement on these. The reviews are variable, have a look:

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00944593000P?mv=rr

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00944595000P?keyword=torque+wrench#reviewsWrap

Important thing to remember: One click, and you're done. Resist the temptation to keep pulling on it.
 

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Harbor Freight. I remember reading that someone one a forum somewhere (was it this one or the KLR forum, I can't remember), took one and had it checked for accuracy. Surprisingly it was right on spec. Not to bad for a cheapo. I figure you can destroy a number of Harbor freight Torque Wrenches before you spend as much as a Snap-on or (insert Expensive Name Brand here). Worth noting, I have noticed a marked increase in the quality of Harbor Freight hand tools. I recently bought a 1/4" ratchet and the quality wasn't Snap-On quality yet but it's way better than most would expect.
 

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does anyone know which size torque wrench is needed to install the triumph center stand on the bonneville?



People are mentioning 3/8 inch and 1/2 inch. which one?
 

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does anyone know which size torque wrench is needed to install the triumph center stand on the bonneville?



People are mentioning 3/8 inch and 1/2 inch. which one?
What is the Torque requirement? If a 3/8" overs it, then it should suffice (My 3/8" goes up to 80 ft/lbs). Wrenches vary, so YMMV. I hardly ever use my 1/2", I just don't run into very much more than 70 ft/lbs very often in my normal goings on.
 

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What is the Torque requirement? If a 3/8" overs it, then it should suffice (My 3/8" goes up to 80 ft/lbs). Wrenches vary, so YMMV. I hardly ever use my 1/2", I just don't run into very much more than 70 ft/lbs very often in my normal goings on.

if you had to buy one or the other, you would buy the 3/8 inch then?
 

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I have two, an inch/lb with 3/8" drive and a ft/lb with a 1/2" drive both Mastercraft from Canadian Tire. I use them both regularly.
 

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Left it up to the wife

I know, who would leave this sort of life-defining/altering decision up to their wife? Well, I did, and I think she picked pretty well.

For birthday last year she got me a 3/8 drive GearWrench 85051 that covers ~4-29 N-M, and for Christmas a matching 85052 that covers ~17-140 N-M. They come in nice hard plastic cases. A quick look on Amazon shows them at $95 & $101 respectively.

I BELIEVE this covers the entire range of torque specs for our M-C's, but a owning the next smaller wrench couldn't hurt (are you listening honey?)

Could I have afforded a Snap-on? Sure, but I don't make a living off my tools, and I'm lucky to use these wrenches once a week. This seems like a solid option- now I can spend the $100's I saved on gas/farkle/etc!

Wait... who am I kidding? My wife spent the $100's SHE saved on check-out-aisle-magazines and boxed sets of America's Next Top Model... (I'll be in the garage for the next 8 hours dear!)

Cheers,
-Lee
 

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does anyone know which size torque wrench is needed to install the triumph center stand on the bonneville?

People are mentioning 3/8 inch and 1/2 inch. which one?
The center stand is a low-tech job, and you might not be able to get the sockets where they need to be anyway. I installed mine with hand wrenches and just made it good and tight.
 

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The center stand is a low-tech job, and you might not be able to get the sockets where they need to be anyway. I installed mine with hand wrenches and just made it good and tight.

I'll do that then, the only reason I asked is because the instructions specify a torque load on one of the bolts
 

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i have two craftsman torque wrenches, their smallest one, which covers an overwhelming majority of the tings you'd encounter in most everyday situations, and then the next one up for bigger jobs, which i have only needed for one job so far which involved removing the rear wheel. both are the Microtork variety, where you dial in your setting. so far i have no complaints and they have treated me very well so far, and i use them a lot. brake calipers/cam cover (very important!), triple tree, axles, replacing the master cylinder, engine covers, replacing clutch springs, etc. if you plan on repairing your bike yourself and doing your own maintenance a torque is a must have, and you are only setting yourself up for trouble if you dont have one. you can put it off, but you will eventually need one! (or two!) i got both of mine at sears for $60-$65 each on sale down from around $80 i think.
 

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I've had good luck with Craftsman

I own three torque wrenches. All are older Craftsman wrenches. I posted a message a couple of years ago asking about calibrating them, and one of our forum members whose job includes tool calibration suggested I send them to him. This very generous member returned them to me with a calibration printout that indicated they were well within spec.

I think one of the main things to remember about torque wrenches is to put them away reset to zero, instead of storing them with the springs under tension.

Bob
 

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I own three torque wrenches. All are older Craftsman wrenches. I posted a message a couple of years ago asking about calibrating them, and one of our forum members whose job includes tool calibration suggested I send them to him. This very generous member returned them to me with a calibration printout that indicated they were well within spec.

I think one of the main things to remember about torque wrenches is to put them away reset to zero, instead of storing them with the springs under tension.

Bob
bob-

very good point. i never thought of doing that, but i will from now on.
 

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I have a 35 year old 1/2" Craftsman torque wrench. We have a cal lab where I work. I asked if they could check the wrench. It was about 5% high. Still good enough.

Mike
 

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This looks like a very good quality wrench. I'm considering it 'cause I'll need one to re-install my headers when they are done being ceramic coated.:cool: It has a very nice small head which I have noticed is IMPORTANT when you wrench on these bikes. You run out of room very quickly.

http://www.emaxaction.com/cdi10002mrmh.aspx
for that price you could have 2 craftsman wrenches. quality may not be as good, but the craftsman stuff is more than adequate for using it to install headers.
 

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for that price you could have 2 craftsman wrenches. quality may not be as good, but the craftsman stuff is more than adequate for using it to install headers.
Yeah, you do have a point. The prices don't reflect the additional 10% discount. So if the price for one of these is $147.00-10%, I'm lookin' at roughly $132.00 (+ shipping) for a very good quality tool.

It has a range of up to 110 Nm which is more than enough to tackle even the rear wheel nuts @ 85 NM.

I dunno, maybe I'll just borrow one to do my job.

I just like/admire fine tools I guess.;)
 

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Yeah, you do have a point. The prices don't reflect the additional 10% discount. So if the price for one of these is $147.00-10%, I'm lookin' at roughly $132.00 (+ shipping) for a very good quality tool.

It has a range of up to 110 Nm which is more than enough to tackle even the rear wheel nuts @ 85 NM.

I dunno, maybe I'll just borrow one to do my job.

I just like/admire fine tools I guess.;)
thats a great tool, but i find myself using the wrench for the smaller values way more often than i do for the larger ones, like the cam cover, cases, break calipers when changing pads, etc, and prefer a torque wrench that is specifically made for the smaller values. having two is the way to go in my opinion. you will find that the larger wrench that has the higher values wont be used as much for everyday work/maintenance and you will be wishing you had one for the smaller values.
 
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