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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey, Im a fairly novice bike owner but in the market for a used Bobber and was wondering what people would usually ask/investigate when buying a Bobber/new bike in general?

I know to ask about service history and inspect for obvious or major problems, inspect oil, brake discs, take it for a ride etc. Do you guys/gals have any other staple things you suss out? Below is a pic of the potential buy.

Thanks in advance

That price is AUD
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I try to find used bikes that are mostly stock. To many "improvements" can be a bad thing since you don't really know if the upgrades were done correctly. A few ascetic addons are fine but they do not really increase the value.
 

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Also you may want to try this site for better Bobber info. Triumph Bobber Forum

The bike in the picture looks good but may be running lean, the header pipes look pretty discolored. Also the price seems high but I am not sure what the going rate is down under.
 

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I initially thought that the price was outrageous, but those in the states with low mileage (i.e., 719 or 876) are running $15155 AUD/ $14736 AUD on the Cycle Trader website, and the population of available Bobbers in Australia would influence what they can ask for this type of bike. Short of borrowing the bike to run through an inspection by a Triumph dealer, I think you're doing all that can be done. By riding it, you'll be able to check out whether the shock is old/worn. (I've got a 2018 and I'm switching to a Fox brand shock since the stock shock rides harder than I remember). The condition of the sprocket/chain might indicate whether it's been ridden hard (if not replaced). You might go to a Triumph dealer where you plan to have it serviced and ask them whether there's any near conclusive determinant to assess major problems; however, with it being only 4 years old, unless it sounds bad or you have problems while riding it that might indicate that it's suspect, then you're possibly clear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I initially thought that the price was outrageous, but those in the states with low mileage (i.e., 719 or 876) are running $15155 AUD/ $14736 AUD on the Cycle Trader website, and the population of available Bobbers in Australia would influence what they can ask for this type of bike. Short of borrowing the bike to run through an inspection by a Triumph dealer, I think you're doing all that can be done. By riding it, you'll be able to check out whether the shock is old/worn. (I've got a 2018 and I'm switching to a Fox brand shock since the stock shock rides harder than I remember). The condition of the sprocket/chain might indicate whether it's been ridden hard (if not replaced). You might go to a Triumph dealer where you plan to have it serviced and ask them whether there's any near conclusive determinant to assess major problems; however, with it being only 4 years old, unless it sounds bad or you have problems while riding it that might indicate that it's suspect, then you're possibly clear.
Wow man, thanks for the tips . That bike has been sold unfortunately, but everything youve suggested is extremely helpful. Ill make a point of learning how to look/feel for it.

Aus market is very slim. I have to check back weekly on bikesales and gumtree and only 1 appears maybe every month or so, and gets sold real quick. So yeah the market favours the sellers here.

Thanks again
 

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Wow man, thanks for the tips . That bike has been sold unfortunately, but everything youve suggested is extremely helpful. Ill make a point of learning how to look/feel for it.

Aus market is very slim. I have to check back weekly on bikesales and gumtree and only 1 appears maybe every month or so, and gets sold real quick. So yeah the market favours the sellers here.

Thanks again
Glad to help. I had absolutely no knowledge of the Aus market, I was just guessing. (IMO, they keep us folks in the US, from grade school on, fed with exclusive US-centric news, so it's not a great surprise that I didn't know. You've got to listen to the BBC to even recall that a world exists outside the US.)

You're probably prudent to wait on a used, available one. My Celtic genes initially agree to try the cheaper way to get a deal, but with little patience, before long I say the hell with it, I'm REALLY want it and I'm GOING for it come hell or high water, and shortly finding myself at the dealer getting a new one. However, when I was young, I didn't have that option with my first Triumph and had to buy used. (With the market so tight, you may want to determine really how much your saving and weigh this against the benefits of buying new. Just a suggestion.)

Wishing you well in your search.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Glad to help. I had absolutely no knowledge of the Aus market, I was just guessing. (IMO, they keep us folks in the US, from grade school on, fed with exclusive US-centric news, so it's not a great surprise that I didn't know. You've got to listen to the BBC to even recall that a world exists outside the US.)

You're probably prudent to wait on a used, available one. My Celtic genes initially agree to try the cheaper way to get a deal, but with little patience, before long I say the hell with it, I'm REALLY want it and I'm GOING for it come hell or high water, and shortly finding myself at the dealer getting a new one. However, when I was young, I didn't have that option with my first Triumph and had to buy used. (With the market so tight, you may want to determine really how much your saving and weigh this against the benefits of buying new. Just a suggestion.)

Wishing you well in your search.
Ha, the insular US news doesn't surprise me dude, I imagine your free-to-air stuff a little like that. Thought to be fair I get most of my international stuff from BBC as well. NYT isn't bad too actually.

And yeah I just don't a new one is a good idea. I want to modify it (wide wheel set, low profile and short mud guards, fender eliminator, +/- exhaust, and more) so buying a new one to rip apart would be insane, especially considering I may **** the bike up being a noob and all. I don't know enough about bikes to change its performance yet either.

I don't know if you or anyone here has seen this guy's Youtube channel, 'Thornton Hundred Motorcycles'? He seems a little one-trick-ponyesque' but by god the bikes he makes are the sexiest things I've seen. His look is essentially what I want to try to mimic. And the Bobber seems like such a nice machine to learn the mechanics of a motorbike by taking it apart and putting it back together.

Anyways, thanks again man
 

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Ha, the insular US news doesn't surprise me dude, I imagine your free-to-air stuff a little like that. Thought to be fair I get most of my international stuff from BBC as well. NYT isn't bad too actually.

And yeah I just don't a new one is a good idea. I want to modify it (wide wheel set, low profile and short mud guards, fender eliminator, +/- exhaust, and more) so buying a new one to rip apart would be insane, especially considering I may **** the bike up being a noob and all. I don't know enough about bikes to change its performance yet either.

I don't know if you or anyone here has seen this guy's Youtube channel, 'Thornton Hundred Motorcycles'? He seems a little one-trick-ponyesque' but by god the bikes he makes are the sexiest things I've seen. His look is essentially what I want to try to mimic. And the Bobber seems like such a nice machine to learn the mechanics of a motorbike by taking it apart and putting it back together.

Anyways, thanks again man
With respect to news: I catch little bits here and occasionally monitor some sites there so I'm generally aware but don't dwell on the negativity of it all like most. As Solomon said, there's nothing new under the sun.

With respect to your choice of a motorcycle: I'd agree, given your intent. Back in the late 70s, because I didn't have a great deal of disposable income and didn't see a lot of stock bikes that appealed to me (or that I could afford), I decided to chop my 1975 Superglide and put it in a rigid frame with slightly extended forks, and 'do it all myself'. I had a vision of what it would look like and was mesmerized by the dream of 'my perfect bike'. It seemed I had acquired catalogs from every custom manufacturer at the time I could find, visited countless swap meets for parts, befriended people to assist me in the electrics--physical assembling of parts--and raking of a stock 1956 hardtail frame, and sending out parts to be chromed, etc. It occupied my mind tremendously, and in retrospect, it cost me a fortune that I never recovered when I'd sold it. But I had to do it, and was glad that I did.

While the bike turned out alright and was safe to ride, what I learned is that it is far safer (and a whole lot more comfortable) to do smaller 'improvements' on a stock bike, than tear the whole thing down with a different suspension. The takeaways was that the more radical the change, the more you need folks available to work you toward a fix, and it seemed hundreds of 'fixes' were needed to get to completion.

Enjoy the endeavor.
 
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