Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of October's Bike of the Month Challenge!
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
200 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 70 Bonnie frame that will need to be stripped and then primed/painted. What is the best way to strip the frames (front and rear sections)? Sandblasting, or paint remover/scraping? As I understand it, some of the tubing connections are brazed, so I don't want to do anything that might damage or weaken them. I will probably replace the headstock races, although they are in good condition. If I keep them, I'll be sure to cover them well and protect them from the sand blasting. Also, I will obviously have the triple tree and forks out, so I'll be working with the bare frame itself. If sandblasting is recommended, is a particular material preferred? Since this isn't a wet frame, I don't think I need to worry too much about grit getting into anything except the headstock area.

Once stripped, I will probably attempt the priming/painting myself, as I can't imagine messing up a gloss black frame too badly, although perhaps I underestimate myself.

Any suggestions or precautions?

Later, I'll need to start another thread on suggestions for cleaning up and cad-plating the various frame nuts and bolts, but one problem at a time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
625 Posts
Blasting will probably be the easiest way to go for uniformity sake, but old paint can be difficult to cut through sometimes. It would probably go easier if you first get the bulk of the paint off of the frame with a chemical stripper.

Once it's stripped and blasted, make sure you clean it VERY well ... and make sure you clean out the headstock before you put it all back together ... you don't want any stray blast media eating up your bearings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,034 Posts
hi UT , i just stripped my frame , rear frame and swingarm using aircraft stripper ,available in any auto parts store , and it worked great . took about 3 hours including wait times , about 10 mins for each area to bubble . fumes weren't bad at all and there's not the roughness left from blasting . i have a large compressor , 5hp 60 gal , but indoors in the winter i wasn't interested in blasting . yes you need a big compressor to power a media blaster . it took way less than a quart . get some gloves and some scotch pads and a six-pack .

for paint i'm going to use this http://www.eastwoodco.com/jump.jsp?itemID=1596&itemType=CONTENT&path=32&KickerID=415&KICKER in the satin finish .

also for my hardware i've got this kit on my shopping list http://www.caswellplating.com/kits/zinc.htm

i'd been doing some posts on my effort but then got side tracked by life , but have been making progress and taking pics and will do a complete run down in a couple months when done .

Cheers , Woody
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
348 Posts
blasting is my way: there is a lot of different materials out there that won't damage anything and its fast and usually pretty cheap
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
625 Posts
Woody-

I've found that almost all of Eastwood's specialty products are great and do precisely what they are described as doing. My only concern with that Ceramic Chassis paint is that it may be very thick. (not viscosity-wise, but it's physical depth as a finish). Test it on something else first to see and, if thick, make sure you don't use it in places where clearance is an issue or on anything threaded. You can always go close to these areas and then 'touch up' with a rattle can.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,533 Posts
Powder coat?

Upstate, are upstate as in NY? If so, I have a friend that does nice powdercoat and is a serious bike guy. He's a roadracer, actually. Although not original, powder coat is very durable. Not sure what your overall plan is for this bike.

If you sandblast, keep in mind that the bare metal will flash rust within seconds of blasting it. So you'll also need a Metal Prep aka phosphoric acid to wipe it down prior to painting. You should use this if you decide to chemical strip as well. Gives the paint a good bite into the metal. Another choice would be to use an etching primer. I believe you can buy it in rattle cans now under the brand SEM at places like Autobody (againing thinking upstate NY).

When you price out the paint and materials to shoot your frame, you may find for a couple buck more you can have someone powder coat it. Something to consider. If you are interested, PM me and I'll hook you up with the powder coater.
regards,
Rob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,034 Posts
"I've found that almost all of Eastwood's specialty products are great and do precisely what they are described as doing. My only concern with that Ceramic Chassis paint is that it may be very thick. (not viscosity-wise, but it's physical depth as a finish)"

can't imagine it's any thicker than powder , but we'll see ;)

i helped set up an oven with a friend but alas it's too small to do a frame and this build is all about doing it myself . besides i actually like spraying . i'm a cabinetmaker . got the fan running out in my shop as i type .

for you lazy folk , stripping was a breeze . the aircraft stripper took it right off . hung from my garage ceiling . rolled up the newspaper under and job done .

DIY there's way more satisfaction :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
625 Posts
If you sandblast, keep in mind that the bare metal will flash rust within seconds of blasting it.
I've experienced no instant flash rusting with bead blasted parts. (aluminum oxide glass bead media) In fact, there is a pair of fork legs, bead blasted over a year ago, sitting in my friend's garage untouched ... they only recently started to show a little surface rust. Nothing a quick run through the bead blaster again before painting won't cure. We were actually discussing this recently ... I don't know why the bead blasted surfaces don't seem to flash up like totally bare metal usually does ...

Any metallurgists care to chime in?
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top