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I originally posted this in the Rides and Events forum, but I don't know if anyone saw it. Perhaps here's a better spot. Of course, maybe the topic is just of no interest, but I'll give it another try.

Per Ted Simon's book, the marketing manager of Triumph declined to sponsor his 2001 world tour to follow his 1970's route he'd taken on a Triumph Tiger 100 (same as my bike today). Instead Ted rode a BMW around the world. This must seem like a real marketing blunder for Triumph, but perhaps they were right to be cautious?

What if Triumph had agreed to sponsor Ted's run around the world. First of all, what bike to take? The obvious choice would seem to be the 2001 Tiger. However Ted, not being of tall stature, complained about the tall seat height of the BMW he used for the trip, and spoke fondly of his 1970 Triumph's low seat height. The very tall seating on the 2001 thus may not be wanted by Ted.

But if not the Tiger, then what else does Triumph have in 2001? Ted's 1970 Triumph was a standard road-bike, not an adventure tourer, so perhaps he can use the new Bonneville, especially if Triumph can cobble together something akin to Scambler mods. The classic-styled triples may have more power, but they're heavy. Perhaps the earlier Trident 750, but ground clearance and sport-seating may be troublesome.

Assuming Ted takes the 2001 Tiger, is Ted likely to have service troubles in Africa and Latin America? Ted found BMW dealerships in Egypt, Kenya and South Africa to fix broken frames and needed engine work. Will Triumph be sending mechanics out by plane in order to rescue Ted along his trip?

What do you think? Was Triumph smart to decline Ted or nuts to give up on such a marketing opportunity
 

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Why?

I think that Triumph did not see the value in supporting Ted for a Round the world venture. Triumph DID support Ted with a Tiger in a USA journey which included the loaner bike and several services along the way. Then Triumph sold the bike to Ted at a extreemly low price after the ride, Ted then resold the bike at a higher price.
In all, I think that Ted wrote just a few reports that made it to publication with a few rag's such as Cycle World and City Bike. In his opening remarks,Ted basicly, well....he kind of complained about the bike. IMHO, Ted is a bit of a Mooch. He always wants everything free. I believe that TMA failed to see a return on investment and felt that the money could be better spent on real ad's and supporting dealer events.
CJS
 

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I agree. Plus, the 2nd book is nothing at all (to me) like the first one - not a compelling read and often it sounds like an old man grumbling.... and I should know exactly what an old man grumbling sounds like, because here I am!
 
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