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Some of my training in soil mechanics was taught by Dr Roy Taylor at Durham Uni. Roy was an expert in the properties of the mudrocks associated with coal deposits, and which played an important part of the cause of the disaster. I remember him in lectures referring to the tip stability issues. I also clearly recall seeing the newspaper billboards announcing the disaster on my way home from school that day.
 

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What a great day! It’s been a while since I’ve been out and pre-flight checks revealed that the rear tyre needed a few PSI. I can’t find anything stuck in the tyre and the valve isn’t leaking so I can only think that the inner tube is a cheapo and letting air out slowly. It’s not bad enough to warrant changing it.

The usual first kick start and off I went joining together some of my usual circuits for an extended blast…only disagreed with a couple of speed limits and came home when the petrol ran onto reserve about 60 miles later, wish I’d filled it up at the start.

Lots has been written about the ‘revvy’ nature of 500’s and like most owners I’ve had the occasional foray north of 6000rpm to see how it goes, mechanical sympathy preventing sustained high revs. Today though I came home on a beautiful country road about 8 miles long and kept the engine spinning well above 5500rpm using mostly 2nd and 3rd gears. Speeds weren’t high because of the bike’s low gearing but it lapped it up. I was expecting new oil leaks or fresh rattles when I got home but nothing, it just settled into it’s idle speed without drama. The battery showed 13.14 volts, probably isn’t that but if it’s around 13 volts when I get home I know the charging system is working.

So, put it back in the shed and go for another ride tomorrow.

Chris
IMG_0454.jpg IMG_0456.jpg IMG_0457.jpg IMG_0459.jpg
 

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Like Chris, but on the Tiger 750. Wall to wall blue sky here, light winds and temperatures into the low 20s. What a change from the last 2 months of record average low temperatures and above average rain here in England - as opposed to the rest of the UK.

Did my usual pre-ride checks of tyre pressures, chain and split link, and fuel level. Skipped the oil level because it's at the max and neither burning nor leaking oil so it'll be fine since I only checked it 60 miles ago.

So, 55 miles around the Marches north of Shrewsbury. The A528 south of Ellesmere (and its Lakes) is a fairly quiet A road, from nowhere to nowhere, twisty and undulating, so lots of interest for the Classic motorcyclist. The Marches landscape is currently its springtime best, lush, rolling green wheat and barley fields, bright yellow oil seed r*pe, trees just into leaf. Various shades of green everywhere.

For our cousins over the Pond, the Marches are the borders of England and Wales, disputed and fought over for centuries, sort of the UK equivalent of the Wild West, but about 500 years earlier. Some villages now English were once Welsh, and vice-versa.

Bike ran perfectly. No coughs, minimal oil weeps. I tightened the headstock bearings a bit after my last ride - it was feeling a bit clattery, now much quieter. Battery showing 12.95V a few hours after returning so the alternator is fine with an LED pilot light as a DRL and LED tail lights.

And a completely different bike to the 500. Bags of torque. Will pull like a train from 1500 rpm. A very relaxed ride. But after almost 2 hours of concentrating on smaller A roads and back lanes, looking for gravel and potholes up ahead, I'd had enough. The concentration gets to me and the finesse goes, so time to go home.

No photos today - no engineering marvels to be seen and a green field looks like any other green field.

It was a bit warm behind my Morgan screen for my heavy Speedwear wax cotton jacket, even mostly unzipped. It's a great jacket when there's a chill in the air, but at midday in 20C it's a bit too warm. Maybe the screen will have to come off for the summer.

Or maybe I need a jacket rethink. Any suggestions anyone?
 

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It's currently very warm and dry in England and Wales (can't speak for Scotland or Norn Ireland) so decided to take the Morgans screen off the Tiger 750 to get the benefit of a bit of air. Only takes a few minutes.

Then went for a 35 miler once the sun had lost some of its heat. Unfortunately, this coincided with going-home-time for the less fortunate (but I've been there). The big no-screen bonus isn't that I can't hear the tappets (but that's still a bonus), but I can hear the sonorous sounds from the 2 exhausts booming off house walls and bridge parapets. Magic.

The Marches countryside is changing rapidly. The corn fields are still lush green, the oil seed r*pe is still bright yellow, but on the roadside verges the first crop dandelions are now into seed-spreading mode, and the buttercups have come out to play.

There now seems to be a concerted effort by our local municipal authorities to let the wild flowers grow on the road verges and not cut them - which I suppose is a win-win. The insects and bees get a new home and my local taxes will go down next year because I didn't have to pay for verge cutting. Oh look!! Pigs !! (as in pigs might fly).

In my little village, for the first time in the 30 years I've lived here (and I'm still not a 'local'), the local authority has recently actually cultivated some of the wider verges and planted wild seed mixes - we are all looking forward to what comes up in a few weeks time. Other verges that they normally cut every few weeks are now knee high in buttercups. Well done to them. Let's hope the bees got the memo.

However, uneventful 35 miler. Pleasantly warm and helped to eradicate the finger nipping memories from last winter.

Uneventful apart from the older lady (and I checked) who decided to pull out from my right onto an A road in front of me, at a leisurely pace, then dawdle along for a quarter of a mile before tuning right off the A road. No dramas from me because I could see what was going to happen and planned accordingly, and just let it all wash over me. Life's too short now.

And what was the sticker in her back window?










"Think Bike".

(For our Leftpondian cousins, Think Bike was a UK public awareness campaign a few years ago).

You couldn't make it up.
 

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Bill, depending where you buy it about £3.00 ish here in N.Ireland and around €4.50-€5.00 in ROI.... not as bad as "la belle France!"

Of course we keep all the best Guinness for ourselves ;) only joking!

Might have one tonight, with a bag of Tayto Cheese 'n Onion crisps....

Cheers, Richard
Tayto crisps, that brings back a taste of Dublin! Never really got on with the black stuff from James Gate, though born 5 mins walk from there, Harp Lager is a different story!
Today I messed about with adjusting the choke on my 1973 T140V, not quite right and unreliable starting from hot, replaced plugs, bloody hot outside here in Hemswell, Lincs. May take a run into Lincoln tomorrow, past RAF Scampton where I used to service the iconic delta wing shaped Vulcan bombers many years ago.
Also sorting out which is best buy option for open face helmets, surname is Nolan and have had a few of those, snug fit. Good luck to all, Liam
 

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Our annual 600-mile ride is on June 27th, so I rode one of the candidates for this year, my 73 TR7. We rode the 56-mile length of the Cache la Poudre river during high water. The others were Ed's 62 750 Norton Atlas and Rick's 71 650 BSA. There was still snow at the 10,276 Cameron Pass. We dodged rain showers on the way back down and hid under the overhanging eave of the restroom at the Century picnic area for 20 minutes and enjoyed our chat. The road was only wet for 20 miles of our 150-mile ride. Ed ran out of gas 10 miles from home and pulled into the driveway of a friend. I turned around when I saw they were not following. They were pouring the gas when I got one mile back to them. The rain washed the dust of my TR7 but I had to wipe the road grime off from riding on the wet road. I'll oil the chain and It's ready
P1040565 (2).JPG
 

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Yesterday was a classic lesson in that even if you think you know your bike from top to bottom there is always something which can catch you out. I’d been to visit friends who have a narrowboat moored in a marina about 35 miles from me. The plan was to take the scenic route on the way and then the motorway for the return journey, weekend traffic would be light and trucks travelling at ‘my’ cruising speed would be few.

Everything went to plan without incident until I came to start the bike to head home. It’d been parked in the sun and was still warm from the outward trip. Usual practice here is to flood the carbs, no choke and a big handful of throttle, it always starts but this time there was no hint of combustion. Fuses checked and all combinations of throttle, choke and flooding failed to get it going. I was on the point of removing the spark plugs when my friend casually pulled the handlebar rubber off the twistgrip. Whatever glue had been holding it on had softened in the sun, when I thought I’d been opening the throttle all I’d been doing is twisting the rubber grip. It took a couple of zip ties to secure it properly and with that done normal service was resumed and I took a gentle 55mph cruise back home along the motorway. The twistgrip rubber is now firmly glued back on.
 

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Whatever glue had been holding it on had softened in the sun, when I thought I’d been opening the throttle all I’d been doing is twisting the rubber grip.
Its interesting that the twist-grip rubber might be glued on. I have always put them on without any adhesive at all.

The way I was taught in a motorcycle workshop (no nonsense/no mess) back in the 60's, was:

To fit a grip - Wet the inside with a little petrol/gas, (these days I use paraffin/kerosene). The grip then slides on easily. It is displaced by the pressure between the grip and the handlebar and goes tight almost immediately.

To remove a grip - Push a long, thin screwdriver blade (wet with petrol/paraffin), up to the handle, between the grip and the handlebar and and then get a few drops more, of petrol/paraffin/kerosene in the space made by the screwdriver. Rocking the screwdriver handle side-to-side, the lubricant will fill the space as you go, working your way around the handlebar. At the same time, twisting pressure back and forth on the grip with your other hand. You won't need to go very far before the grip will move easily and you can pull it off. - Its taken you longer to read this, than it actually takes to do it.

If however, the grip is glued on, more often than not, a contact adhesive was used. Using petrol/gasoline will often get the glue moving, but it will take longer and what comes off will be a sticky mess. The worst is if the handlebar was wrapped with electrical insulation tape before putting the grip on - in either case, just throw the grip away, clean the handlebar and fit the replacement without any adhesive.

Terry
 

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Likewise, I don't use glue on my grips either. I use Windex (Glass cleaner) to aid in sliding the grips on, but the same idea.

Rob
 

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I use Beeston grips and if i dont glue them on, the grip rides up and starts leaving the handlebars on both ends of the bars. Quite a risk when you might be moving the bike around parking. I use a little contact glue and it stays put.
 

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I use Beeston grips and if i dont glue them on, the grip rides up and starts leaving the handlebars on both ends of the bars.
Hi Rambo, What you have said is interesting, because, those are the ones I am using now. Are they the same as yours?

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756923
 

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Hi,
just throw the grip away
Before doing so, look at the make, moulded on the 'usually-hidden' side of the widest part):-

. Pre-'69 (afaict), Triumph fitted Amal grips; afaik the grips available new from Amal now are faithful(?) copies.

. 69-on, Triumph fitted Italian "Gran Turismo" grips, which were the same length as the Amal twistgrip drum; be aware these are NLA, there are three alternatives:-

.. Modern Amal grips.

.. Modern "Gran Turismo" grips, which are 3/8" shorter than the originals; (n) is the twistgrip drum must be shortened or you have a ~3/8" gap between the widest part of the grip and the twistgrip housing; (y) on a '69 or '70 Triumph is you don't have to cut the widest part of the left grip to clear the handlebar dipswitch lever.

.. Beston grips, which are 1/4" longer than either Amal or original Gran Turismo; ime, while they're softer and stickier than other grips, the end ~1/4" without the twistgrip drum underneath, if that drags on the handlebar, tracing the resulting throttle closing problems will drive you nuts; (n) '69 or '70 Triumph, if you habitually ride with your left hand against the widest part of the grip, the dipswitch lever pokes you in the soft skin between thumb and forefinger (n) ... amhikt ... Aside, Bestons seem to fit Japanese bikes' twistgrip drums exactly; presumably not surprising as Bestons are Japanese ...?

To fit a grip - Wet the inside with a little petrol/gas, (these days I use paraffin/kerosene).
If you don't want stinky hands, similar to @mach1970 Rob, I use cheap spray furniture polish.

Hth.

Regards,
 

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69-on, Triumph fitted Italian "Gran Turismo" grips, which were the same length as the Amal twistgrip drum
Another gem of information Stuart, my grip has 'Made in Italy' moulded into it and I was trying to fathom which current aftermarket manufacturer would source from there. Perhaps they're OEM and are just getting a bit tired? A couple of dabs of silicon sealant has fixed the problem on both sides.

Chris
 

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Hi Rambo, What you have said is interesting, because, those are the ones I am using now. Are they the same as yours?

View attachment 756920 View attachment 756923
Yes, just like those with the air cushioning to keep vibration from the fingers. There are some poor copies on the market but yours look to be the real thing. I will only use the Beston grips as the comfort is the best of any grips i have tried.
 

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I always use the wife’s industrial strength hair spray. As a liquid it lubricates to allow the grips to be slid easily into position and drys like a contact adhesive.
you’ll have to cut them off when you want to remove them, but you wouldn’t re-use them anyway, would you?
 

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Just put a pair of Japanese Bestons on my Tiger 750 to replace the perished hard rubber grips. They may have been original? I have the Bestons on my Daytona too. No glue. Slide them on with WD40 and overnight they grip tight.
 

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With beston grips, it is the left one that seems to try and slide off when riding. The biggest problem with that is the pushing into or out of the garage where the grip might just let go and you drop the bike.
I have them on my Spitfire also as i like the damping of the vibration.
Just watch out for those imitation ones if buying. They have a separate sleeve inside the outer and absolute c**p
 

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There's always something. No, not a loose Beston grip.

Having completed my self-set domestic goals for the day (collect the wife's hanging baskets from the nursery, walk dog (twice), load washing machine (now I'm on my own it's a once-every-10 days job) etc.,) it was mid afternoon and time to exercise the Daytona. Topped up the tank with 97 octane, checked the oil and tyre pressures, checked the battery (12.6V after 10 days standing) and all good to go.

After around 40 miles of sunny and pleasant (other than a near-miss with a Canada goose and then a demented squirrel - par for the course in rural England), rural riding in the Marches (see earlier post) and about 5 miles from home I noticed that the rear brake was a bit ineffectual and making a clattering whenever applied. Didn't actually ignore it but since everything else was OK carried on to home. I didn't want to know as I was still mobile.

After disrobing of the motorcycling armour plating, had a look. Took me a couple of minutes to find out that the front bolt of the brake torque stay had gone AWOL and the torque stay had dropped by an inch or so. Fortunately the brake backplate had not rotated sufficiently for the front of the torque stay to catch on the road and maybe propel the rear of the bike upwards. .

Fitted a new bolt and Nyloc and all seems OK again. Given that the original bolt had a Nyloc too, I'm at a loss to understand how disassembly had occurred, but I'll be keeping an eye on this one in future.

Near miss I think. Maybe an unintended consequence of a clean bike and all-new fasteners - no rust and crud to hold it all together.
 
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