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Andy, apparently you can ride alone as it is an excercise. Not that i will ride in this cold though. Any accident putting me into a hospital is too high a risk. Not fallen off in 42 years but ice might get me. Fairly safe from covid down here but the hospital in Exeter seems to be getting swamped. I would go out if the roads were dry and over 4c. Until then, i have the car.
Hi Rambo, I'd only go out anyway on a dry road at this time of year, preferably in the middle of the day if it's sunny - after commuting all year round from Reading into Westminster when I was a young man, I've had my fill of dark, wet roads. And I'd not bounce as well as I used to.

Not sure about riding a bike being exercise though - although kickstarting it must qualify. In any event, I have to take the dog out 3 times a day, and Boris says we can only go out once - so I'm waiting for the police helicopter to swoop one day!
 

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I just now wrote out the Bill of Sale for my trusty old '67 Bonnie; the first Britbike I ever owned, purchased in 1985. Kinda sad to see it go, but I haven't ridden it in years; just too many bikes to keep up with. I'm sure I'll kick myself later, but what's done is done. It's hell not having insurance (of course NOW we do...)

743710
 

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Last few days hit and miss bodywork on my 70 Tr6r, getting to the point of paint soon, still don't know what color or scheme. Tank is one of the nicest condition vintage I've seen, only epoxy and block sand.
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Whilst sorting the 3rd to 2nd gearchange issue (see above) I also had on my winter list checking the primary chain on my 73 TR7RV. I suppose I really should have paid more attention in last winter's rebuild, but I wanted to have a look inside the primary this winter, 1200 miles on, to check on my new clutch and its 7 plate conversion.

Took the cover off and I was very impressed at the cleanliness in there. No sludges, everything more or less spotless. Checked the primary wear by pulling it off the clutch basket and I could get maybe 40% of a tooth gap, so a bit less than worn out, but time to change.

I'd hoped simply to slide the centre off the hub, but it was a 'tight' (ahem) fit to get the centre on last winter, so not surprised that it didn't want to come off the hub, so the clutch had to come off in one lump.

I refitted the clutch centre nut last winter with Loctite (243 IIRC) but that came off OK with a breaker bar and the bike in 5th and the rear wheel locked up. The challenge was the washer behind it. Some Loctite must have wicked along the hub thread and glued the washer to the shaft, and there was no moving it. Resorted to the heat gun and I managed to get the washer to spin, but it wouldn't come out as there's nothing to get hold of. Eventually remembered that I had some small Neodymium magnets left over from my r/c aeromodelling days (door and hatch closures) and (after finding them.....) was able to finagle the washer out. A tap on the centre bolt on the clutch tool and off it came.

However, taking the clutch off complete means that the crank sprocket has to come too. The rotor came off easily and a 3 leg puller soon released the sprocket. I usually take the centre off the hub drop the roller bearings out and that gives enough room to work the chain off the basket - so I only need to unbolt the stator and I can get the chain off, leaving the rotor and engine sprocket in-situ. But not this time.

Whilst the sprocket is not excessively worn (IMHO) having got it off it seemed only wise to fit a new one, so the job is halted whilst a new one arrives. That way, the chain, engine sprocket will be new, and the clutch basket has only done 1200 miles. These sprockets seem to be in short supply - I only found 2 suppliers in the UK with stock - and one of these only had one left on the shelf. Since I only need one, that's fine for me.

20210112_140856.jpg


Not expecting any dramas putting it all back together later in the week.
 

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Whilst sorting the 3rd to 2nd gearchange issue (see above) I also had on my winter list checking the primary chain on my 73 TR7RV. I suppose I really should have paid more attention in last winter's rebuild, but I wanted to have a look inside the primary this winter, 1200 miles on, to check on my new clutch and its 7 plate conversion.

Took the cover off and I was very impressed at the cleanliness in there. No sludges, everything more or less spotless. Checked the primary wear by pulling it off the clutch basket and I could get maybe 40% of a tooth gap, so a bit less than worn out, but time to change.

I'd hoped simply to slide the centre off the hub, but it was a 'tight' (ahem) fit to get the centre on last winter, so not surprised that it didn't want to come off the hub, so the clutch had to come off in one lump.

I refitted the clutch centre nut last winter with Loctite (243 IIRC) but that came off OK with a breaker bar and the bike in 5th and the rear wheel locked up. The challenge was the washer behind it. Some Loctite must have wicked along the hub thread and glued the washer to the shaft, and there was no moving it. Resorted to the heat gun and I managed to get the washer to spin, but it wouldn't come out as there's nothing to get hold of. Eventually remembered that I had some small Neodymium magnets left over from my r/c aeromodelling days (door and hatch closures) and (after finding them.....) was able to finagle the washer out. A tap on the centre bolt on the clutch tool and off it came.

However, taking the clutch off complete means that the crank sprocket has to come too. The rotor came off easily and a 3 leg puller soon released the sprocket. I usually take the centre off the hub drop the roller bearings out and that gives enough room to work the chain off the basket - so I only need to unbolt the stator and I can get the chain off, leaving the rotor and engine sprocket in-situ. But not this time.

Whilst the sprocket is not excessively worn (IMHO) having got it off it seemed only wise to fit a new one, so the job is halted whilst a new one arrives. That way, the chain, engine sprocket will be new, and the clutch basket has only done 1200 miles. These sprockets seem to be in short supply - I only found 2 suppliers in the UK with stock - and one of these only had one left on the shelf. Since I only need one, that's fine for me.

View attachment 744200

Not expecting any dramas putting it all back together later in the week.
Famous and last words come to mind
 

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Hi ****, yes indeedy.....But, it all went together OK last winter, and other than the Loctited washer it all came apart easily enough. What could possibly go wrong? 🤞
 

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Ah, yes, but that's the other side. I'm in Primary side mode atm. Until I dare go out on the road and try out the index plunger change, I'm not looking any further than changing the return springs on the timing side! Now I have the g/b oil out, having a look inside the outer cover is easy enough, but I'm not sure I'll be able to see if there's anything in there that may be causing the problem, other than looking for witness marks - but changing the springs can't do any harm. Assuming the quadrant plungers really are 5 spd.

My money's on that camplate plunger.
 

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New engine sprocket arrived this am, very quick service from Mike Boulton in Somerset. It's a Harris part too. Very snug fit on the crank splines, needed a few light taps with a persuader and it was on, and the clutch at the same time, and a new primary chain from Regina.

Just a few bits left to fit and the primary side will be just about up to as new.

The difference between new and old is clear:

20210113_115159.jpg


For the few thousand of miles I'll do on this bike I suspect the old sprocket would have sufficed, but for £50 delivered, while I had the primary in bits it was sensible to change it. I'm now 99.9% confident the primary side will not let me down and destroy my cases.
 

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New engine sprocket arrived this am, very quick service from Mike Boulton in Somerset. It's a Harris part too. Very snug fit on the crank splines, needed a few light taps with a persuader and it was on, and the clutch at the same time, and a new primary chain from Regina.

Just a few bits left to fit and the primary side will be just about up to as new.

The difference between new and old is clear:

View attachment 744301

For the few thousand of miles I'll do on this bike I suspect the old sprocket would have sufficed, but for £50 delivered, while I had the primary in bits it was sensible to change it. I'm now 99.9% confident the primary side will not let me down and destroy my cases.
 

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Hello Andy
Likewise, I have a new engine sprocket, primary chain (Regina) and clutch basket (Harris) ready to be fitted to my '71 T100R.
I checked the chain on the bench and it measured exaclty right with no stretch. Measured it with a hanging weight and it was definitely worn.
I am in the process of rebuilding the gearbox. I have a problem with the gear selectors, as its snowing here I may leave further work until later.
Nick
 

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Hi Nick,

I also have a '72 T100R and I put a new IWIS (IIRC) primary chain on that a few weeks ago. It was definitely worn as tested by measuring. I've not changed the engine sprocket on that though. It had a new Harris basket last year. I'm lucky to have a heated garage so winter maintenance is not a problem.

Loads of help on here if you have a gearbox problem and need advice.
 

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Hi Nick,

I also have a '72 T100R and I put a new IWIS (IIRC) primary chain on that a few weeks ago. It was definitely worn as tested by measuring. I've not changed the engine sprocket on that though. It had a new Harris basket last year. I'm lucky to have a heated garage so winter maintenance is not a problem.

Loads of help on here if you have a gearbox problem and need advice.
Hello Andy
I have dismantled the gearbox before and have renewed plungers, springs etc. I bought a new camplate but it wasn't good quality and was returned.The bore of the boss was not perpendicular to the plate so wouldn't fit and I reused the old one. The gearchange worked but wasn't perfect.
I recently had some engine work done by SRM and I stripped the transmission before I sent the engine off.
SRM did a very good job, and the engine is now in the frame and gearbox reassembly is next.
This time I have another new camplate and this one fits.
The gears change up is ok 1st to 3rd. 3rd to 4th is difficult. 4th down to 3rd locks up.
I think I have found the cause, it's a problem with the innermost selector roller navigating or in this case not navigating the camplate slot.
It's still snowing but gives me time to think of the solution.
I heated garage would be nice.
Nick
 

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Only $5.00 at the pumps needed this morning due to the more recent limitations imposed. No longer riding to work, my mileage is greatly reduced lately. I have noticed however, as the restrictions get tighter and my rides get shorter and less frequent due to being more confined to my home, my bike, when I get to occasionally pick-up essentials, brings me the salvation I need during lockdown!
Ironically, when I got the bike 49 years ago I never knew what trouble I would get into with it. Now, with lockdown, I don't know what trouble I would get into without it.

20210117_093402.jpg
 

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Well, Today it was 14C and sunny so got the bike out for a 20 mile ride after 7 weeks sitting in the garage. Now, the Bridge Inn is the first pub in England that the Queen Elizabeth 11 had a pint of beer in. About 30 years ago now. Its a 16th century pub but closed down now for the lockdown. In the tent you might see a Vauxhall Velox from the late 1950s belonging to the owner.
The mirror is the pair i bought for £10 at a jumble.
The almost deserted road is the Honiton road, a route to London from Exmouth.
Great to get out in the sunshine again and not feel cold.
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They might be larger and numerous, but I'm louder and faster. I rolled up on them in neutral with the motor off. They were all lying down. When I kick started the Triumph, they all stood up and started moving away. The 66 had been sitting for months and didn't start until the 3rd kick. It would have been helpful to charge the battery, but I was in a hurry after pumping up the flat rear tire. Riding through a herd of buffalo in Yellowstone was much scarier. I pulled in the clutch and gave it a couple of loud revs and they gave me enough road to pass by. Loud pipes are helpful at times. The muddy road down to the pavement was interesting, but this was the 1st warm day of the year.
 
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