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Unpredictable weather here today and the planned ride has been postponed until later when the roads will have dried out some. During the unexpected downpour I managed to extract the steering lock, the bike came without a key and whilst I probably won’t use it (because I’ll forget that it’s locked and ride off) I’d rather the lock was functional.

It was a pretty simple exercise thanks to this forum, the only tricky bit was not going too far when drilling out the small cover plate. I did just catch the grub screw but it’s still useable. The EJR number is stamped on the lock barrel, give that and £3.99 to a nice e-bay seller and a key should arrive in the post soon.
DSCN2233.jpg
 

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Exercised the Daytona this morning, sunny periods here so needed to get out as tomorrow's f/cast is not good - for classic motorcycling or the 3rd Test at Manchester. Another 45 miles on the clock. Vast numbers of cyclists about too - not an event but everybody who's got a bike must have been out today.
 

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Hi Chris,
steering lock,
probably won’t use it (because I’ll forget that it’s locked and ride off)
You might find forgetting and riding off somewhat difficult as the lock only ... errr ... locks ... when the forks are turned fully to the left. ;)

Hth.

Regards,
 

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T140D head was bowed by 3 thou, tweaked it flat again. 20200726_203138.jpg 20200726_203109.jpg
 

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Hi Terry
This is very interesting! Could you explain some details about your technique, please.
Hi Terry,
Sorry, I just dropped a couple of pictures in a ‘what we have been up to’ thread, and I did not think to make a technical post in it.
I can add some text though, But please treat it as a ‘what I did’ rather than a ‘How to’.

There was a weep from a pushrod tube seal, so it was time to replace the seals- the plan was not to get too involved in the engine, just replace the seals and pop the head back on. But found a suspicious dark area on the land between the cylinders, checked the head with a straight edge and found I could slip a 3 thou feeler gauge between the head and straight edge.
I cleaned the head, removed the valves and heated it in my garage oven for a couple of hours, at 175 degrees C.
I turned down the end of a nylon bar to fit between the vertical fins of the Head, so hopefully I could press with minimal risk of damage.
731427


I placed two bars across the head in line with the outer bolt holes, to support the outside only while I pressed the middle down. I then placed a plastic board on the bars, the idea was that the plastic board would protect the head from the steel bars, but would flex during the pressing process.
731428

The board is a strange shape because it is really my piston support board used for fitting cylinders. You can see where the head has pressed into the plastic (on the board and the nylon bar).
I used a combination of pressure gauge and dial gauge (dti) to monitor the forces and a ‘laser’ temperature gun to monitor the temperature.
Then it was just press a little, remove from the press and check the bow, monitor temperature .
Refit into press, press a little harder, remove and check.
When the temperature got to 150 degrees C, reheat.
As soon as there was an improvement and the head did not spring all the way back to 3 thou bow, I set the pressure to the last used reading and zeroed the dial gauge. When I pressed 0.00175" the head sprang back 0.00075" so I got 1 thou of straightening for 1.75 thou of pressing.
I just kept repeating, checking and gradually increasing the pressure until the head was flat.
I placed the head back in the press under a little bit of pressure while it cooled.

Things still to do:

The valve guides are in good condition so I am not looking to replace them if I can help it.
I will check the valve guide to seat alignment in case the heating and pressing have distorted anything, if it is reasonable I will touch the seats in with a light hand grind/polish.
If there is a problem with valve alignment I will have to have the valve guides professionally replaced, as I cannot replace them successfully successfully at home.

best regards
Peg.
 
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Peg you never cease to impress. You're a machinist by trade?
 

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Hi Terry

Hi Terry,
Sorry, I just dropped a couple of pictures in a ‘what we have been up to’ thread, and I did not think to make a technical post in it.
I can add some text though, But please treat it as a ‘what I did’ rather than a ‘How to’.

There was a weep from a pushrod tube seal, so it was time to replace the seals- the plan was not to get too involved in the engine, just replace the seals and pop the head back on. But found a suspicious dark area on the land between the cylinders, checked the head with a straight edge and found I could slip a 3 thou feeler gauge between the head and straight edge.
I cleaned the head, removed the valves and heated it in my garage oven for a couple of hours, at 175 degrees C.
I turned down the end of a nylon bar to fit between the vertical fins of the Head, so hopefully I could press with minimal risk of damage.
View attachment 731427

I placed two bars across the head in line with the outer bolt holes, to support the outside only while I pressed the middle down. I then placed a plastic board on the bars, the idea was that the plastic board would protect the head from the steel bars, but would flex during the pressing process.
View attachment 731428
The board is a strange shape because it is really my piston support board used for fitting cylinders. You can see where the head has pressed into the plastic (on the board and the nylon bar).
I used a combination of pressure gauge and dial gauge (dti) to monitor the forces and a ‘laser’ temperature gun to monitor the temperature.
Then it was just press a little, remove from the press and check the bow, monitor temperature .
Refit into press, press a little harder, remove and check.
When the temperature got to 150 degrees C, reheat.
As soon as there was an improvement and the head did not spring all the way back to 3 thou bow, I set the pressure to the last used reading and zeroed the dial gauge. When I pressed 0.00175" the head sprang back 0.00075" so I got 1 thou of straightening for 1.75 thou of pressing.
I just kept repeating, checking and gradually increasing the pressure until the head was flat.
I placed the head back in the press under a little bit of pressure while it cooled.

Things still to do:

The valve guides are in good condition so I am not looking to replace them if I can help it.
I will check the valve guide to seat alignment in case the heating and pressing have distorted anything, if it is reasonable I will touch the seats in with a light hand grind/polish.
If there is a problem with valve alignment I will have to have the valve guides professionally replaced, as I cannot replace them successfully successfully at home.

best regards
Peg.
Hi Slofut,
No I’m just an amateur bodger.
I just don’t post the stuff that goes badly wrong😊
Hi Peg, I would say you're a lot more than an amateur bodger, with a technique worked out like that.
How did you arrive at the (I assume ) stress relieving parameters that you used?

Regards, Terry
 

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Further to my post 6110 above, I splashed out on a new Amal supplied by Burlen and set up for the 72 TR7RV. Fitted that over the weekend.

It ran straight out of the box, but had some hesitancy at mid throttle when accelerating (which I put down to the wrong needle groove, and I could not get the air screw quite right. However, I also knew that the 18 month old Yuasa battery was becoming u/s, so ordered a new Motobatt and fitted that today.

Without touching the carb, the bike ran better than ever - the hesitancy had gone and I could fettle the tickover to get it where I wanted it. Covered about 20 miles on it and came home to finally strobe the timing.

Interesting. I had set it statically when I rebuilt the engine over the winter but it was too advanced according to the strobe, so I retarded it a bit, and after some trial and error the timing mark was maybe maybe 1/4" after the pointer, i.e after the timing mark, so more retarded than it should be. I'm running on 97 octane fuel, and 7.4:1 pistons. It seemed to run really well. Much smoother, more responsive, it just seemed happier set maybe 5 degrees more retarded than spec.

Is this right? Should it be more retarded than spec given the fuels we have now 50 years after the bike was designed?
 

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Hi Peg, I would say you're a lot more than an amateur bodger, with a technique worked out like that.
How did you arrive at the (I assume ) stress relieving parameters that you used?

Regards, Terry
Hi Terry,
I just guessed at the temperature, that is why I said "don’t treat this a a how to"

My thoughts were simple and basic.
Definitely not cold as aluminium based alloys can crack.
Aluminium melts around 650 degrees C, So definitely not that temperature
it becomes very ‘plastic’ at about 350degs, so lower than that.
Valve seats are changed at around 250 degs, I didn’t want them falling out.
I know as a rule of thumb the upper temperature limit for regularly run machines is 175 degs C (350f)if the are aluminium alloy, so I used the upper safe running limit as a max. But It was just a guess.

regards
Peg.
 
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Short ride this Morning then back to change two fuel hose clips for stainless ones. New copper seals to float bowl drain plugs. Not much going wrong or falling off these days.
 

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Out for a 30 mile ride then return to replace the exhaust with a pair of Dunstall replicas which have been drilled out a little to let out some noise. Made up two steel plates with threads to fit in the silence fixing slots. M6 metric bolts. I used these silencers about 10 years ago and they slowed down acceleration when above 80 mph. Not much but it was noticeable compared to the Tulip pipes or long Thruxton silencers.. Trying a bit of quiet for now.
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RIMG0540.JPG
 

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This type is the same as OCR has on his Daytona. Also drilled through the six small pipes in the end to get a bit more noise out. OCR seems to have vanished lately which is a shame with the talents he has with the Daytona.
 
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