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Today was another ride along the Jurassic coast. Sidmouth, Branscombe and Beer, a little village where i often go fishing. 65 mile ride.Branscombe was famous a few years back when a container ship beached and lost containers of new BMW motorcycles and many new BMW parts. Locals grabbed most of it and sold it on ebay until the police sealed off the roads. A few pics.
Great pics Rambo. My parents used to live in Honiton. Sadly Dad's no longer with us and Mum's in care but we still rent their bungalow and so visit every now and then. Beer's a favourite location of ours, I've sat in that garden in your last pic with a crab sandwich and a pint many times.
 

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Hi Peg,

to comply with European harmonisation, speed limiters are set to 90 kmh - (55.92 mph)
Mmmm ... when I lived and drove down south, it was an unremarkable experience to be passed quickly by HGV from a certain island to the left of GB ...

"Here" in my previous post is the Highlands. Single-carriageway sections of the A9 between Perth and Inverness are covered by average-speed cameras, the HGV limit is a special 50 mph. The dual-carriageway parts are the normal HGV 50 mph but not covered by cameras, I've ceased to be surprised when passed by HGV from certain companies that are clearly going a bit quicker than 55.92 mph ... Aside, that can also happen going uphill ... but 650- and 750-bhp tractor units are more common here, doubtless to cope with the gradients on the A9 north of Inverness ... :whistle:

Regards,
 

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Hi Peg,


Mmmm ... when I lived and drove down south, it was an unremarkable experience to be passed quickly by HGV from a certain island to the left of GB ...

"Here" in my previous post is the Highlands. Single-carriageway sections of the A9 between Perth and Inverness are covered by average-speed cameras, the HGV limit is a special 50 mph. The dual-carriageway parts are the normal HGV 50 mph but not covered by cameras, I've ceased to be surprised when passed by HGV from certain companies that are clearly going a bit quicker than 55.92 mph ... Aside, that can also happen going uphill ... but 650- and 750-bhp tractor units are more common here, doubtless to cope with the gradients on the A9 north of Inverness ... :whistle:

Regards,
Hi Stuart
An interesting observation about the ROI, it had not gone unnoticed by the UK road authorities either.
At one time Irish road transport was administered by 9 County Officers, however this was a very disjointed and somewhat ineffective way of management.
Bearing in mind that most of the goods transported from the Republic of Ireland to mainland Europe passed along the M4 and M6/M1 corridors a lot of mostly unregulated ROI fleets were Passing through the UK, unsurprisingly at the turn of the century the UK authorities clamped down hard on ROI registered vehicles. The clampdown made it almost impossible to get an Irish registered truck from Fishguard, Hollyhead or Liverpool to Folkstone, Dover or Harwich without being stopped and inspected, sometimes multiple times in one journey.
The Oireachtas in Dublin was under pressure and set up a new body in 1986 to manage the Republic of Ireland’s road network.
The new Road Transport Authority (RTA) Has been quite remarkable and has very quickly regulated all aspects of transport in The ROI.
In the UK the road haulage industry has undergone technical changes that make speeding a lot more difficult.
At one time a lot of drivers carried a ‘blown’ fuse with them and replaced the good fuse in the speed limiter power supply with it, making it ineffective, while providing evidence of ‘malfunction’ if they were stopped. But times have changed, The UK authorities (DVSA) have made fleet owners more responsible for the actions of their drivers, Electronic tachographs data log every aspect of a vehicles journey, and in the last few years nearly all goods transport vehicles are managed in real time from the companies head office, any speeding is instantly flagged up.
There are still cowboys out there, but they are getting very few and far between. Most truck drivers on UK roads are now very professional.

The A9 sounds as difficult as it ever was, hopefully the wonderful A96 Aberdeen to Inverness is still exhilarating, that is one road where you wish your T140 was a T160.

regards
Peg.
 

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My SWEET '72 Bonnie, I’m ashamed to say, has not been run/ridden for 9 months. After a 2+ hour ride before supper on my new Bonneville Speedmaster with my son on one of my Harley’s behind me, she looked so lonely after supper, she just begged me to take her out before dark.

Would you believe, after a few, ignition-off priming kicks, she started on the first kick? And just immediately purred like a kitten?

I had a great 25 or so miles on what ran and felt like a new motorcycle…..and really, really enjoyed it.

Sorry to all I've been absent so much......an incredible true "barn find" (friend's barn) 1976 Porsche 914 was thrust into my possession and I've been working my butt off for the last year getting it running like new (dual Weber carbs - it screams) and restoring it.....

And as all my old Trumpies are running like new with zero problems, I have nothing to post about them.

Hope everyone here is well.....

GN
 

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Great pics, Rambo - as always. Thanks.

GN

50 mile ride in the sun to a village called Kenn. This area is full of 400 year old houses and buildings like most of the Devon villages. The church is the Andrew Kenn church. often, the landowner would build these for his workers.
One picture shows the front brake plate painted silver like they were when new. i got fed up polishing the aluminium that used to be mirror finish.
Nice ride and the oil got a little hotter today. Still not very hot cases though. Still could put your hands on the sides.
 

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My SWEET '72 Bonnie, I’m ashamed to say, has not been run/ridden for 9 months. After a 2+ hour ride before supper on my new Bonneville Speedmaster with my son on one of my Harley’s behind me, she looked so lonely after supper, she just begged me to take her out before dark.

Would you believe, after a few, ignition-off priming kicks, she started on the first kick? And just immediately purred like a kitten?

I had a great 25 or so miles on what ran and felt like a new motorcycle…..and really, really enjoyed it.
GN
Great to hear, GN!

After several days of fiddling with carbs, adjusting needles checking coils and wiring, I resolved my faltering acceleration from the right cylinder. It turned out to a tight tappet. Bike is back! Like yours, GN, it felt like a new bike!

Gave the neighbours a break this morning and took the bike to our BMO Stadium empty empty parking lot to tune the carbs without disturbing people's Sunday morning. Very difficult for me to stop riding today!
 

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Contrary to you guys riding and enjoying your bikes,I managed to set fire to my Trident trying to start it against my better judgment telling me quietly something is wrong after my first try. I was lucky to get out of it relatively unscathed using a garden hose from my garage, but a bout of excitement for me, my family and neighbors was priceless specially with fire brigade coming and flames of fire raging between our and my neighbor's car.
Therefore my plan of using it for a week or two is officially cancelled.
 

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Yes Stuart, my stupidity.
Damaged air filter, front of a seat, return oil line under it, part of alternator wiring, part of main loom under a seat, possibly Trispark loom as well ( didn' check it yet but both alternator wires and Trispark wires go up on the opposite side of a frame to turn under a seat to coils and Trispark module, close to completely destroyed air filter ), carburetors are full of soot and water with fuel hose connecting them burned, one fuel hose on timing side burned, petcocks and back of the tank sooty but still work.
Caught it in the last moment, before loosing it completely.
Installed HT wires in wrong order, didn't check it with coil wires trusting my fucked up memory and tried to start it forcefully on open throttle with lots of gas in carburetors with part of it leaking to the air filter.
 

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Commiserations - looks like it could have been a lot worse. Whilst many of us have not actually had a conflagration, on reflection, more of us could have, I have no doubt. There, but for the grace of.......
 

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Adam - so glad you are ok and the bike is not toast......

Don't feel bad - sounds just like something I would do.

Glad damage is no worse and hope you can get it back on the road soon.

GN

Contrary to you guys riding and enjoying your bikes,I managed to set fire to my Trident trying to start it against my better judgment telling me quietly something is wrong after my first try. I was lucky to get out of it relatively unscathed using a garden hose from my garage, but a bout of excitement for me, my family and neighbors was priceless specially with fire brigade coming and flames of fire raging between our and my neighbor's car.
Therefore my plan of using it for a week or two is officially cancelled.
 

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Very lucky to save it. I have 3 fire extinguishers in the garage. CO2 and dry powder. 4 bikes in there so i take every precaution. Not had a carb fire yet but had a few flames throwing out over the years.
 

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Thank you guys for kind words,
I will be refurbishing it slowly during summer together with building my BSA which takes much longer than anticipated because of Covid.
 

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Best wishes to you Adam on both your rebuilds. I know you'll keep us in the loop.

As the '72 Bonnie was running so sweet last evening, we had to do it again after supper tonight, only with my son Tim following me on my new Bonnie Speedmaster. We did 43 miles in area rural twisties and I gave the old T120 a good thrashing, loving the sound of blasting through the gears on the Dunstall's - there is no sound like it.

Stopped by to see my friend Chuck Bent who lives about 8 miles north of me, president of our VBMC (Virginia British Motorcycle Club), and VP of our Antique Motorcycle Club of America as he has a long history of Triumph's and now has a '72 T120V in his stable like mine he inherited from our good friend Dick Marshall who passed away early in '19 - in his sleep as we all hope to. His '72 has my original mufflers/silencers that I gave to Dick (they are mint, pulled when bike was originally sold and never really used afterwards) as Dick wanted his '72 to be ALL original for AMCA showing competition. Chuck also has 2 other show-winning old Triumph's: a '57 Triumph "Bathtub" and '57 TRW. And a '47 Indian Chief (both his parents and grandparents were Indian dealers in Wisconsin), and a rare old Sportster.

Temps dropped a lot on the way home but it was a great short ride, and I am so grateful for my T120 and how well she runs - and looks.

GN
 

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How Sunday should be spent...and how I’ll be spending a sunny Monday (today).

Pics are of a fave lunch pub, I’ll be first in the queue when it re-opens. The river Lambourn opposite the pub enjoying the fruits of a very soggy UK winter, it’s often dry at this time of year and the duck race has to be cancelled. Bike in front of a unrestricted Byway, if your vehicle is road legal you can drive it along these but they’re used by pedestrians and horse riders too so caution is needed. If it’s easy going and not rutted I’m tempted to try the bike’s dirt track capabilities.

Chris B
Bike.JPG Lambourn.JPG Pub.JPG
 

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Curiosity got the better of me today. I’ve always wondered what’s in the cone shaped housing calling itself the front brake light switch on my Daytona. It’s not adjustable and in the shed it works with a strong pull on the lever but that’s something I wouldn’t normally need on the road, a light pull does nothing and having taken apart an old one I can see why.

For the switch to work a rubber washer with cut-outs for the terminals has to be compressed sufficiently by the outer cables for the terminal ends to contact the brass washer (housed in the right ‘cone’) and make the circuit. On this switch the rubber washer is 3.5mm thick which doesn’t seem much but when amplified at the brake lever gave a very spongy action and late illumination. The replacement cable which was fitted when I bought the bike is exactly the same.

So now I know….sorry if you already knew this.
DSCN2226.jpg
 
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