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When I need ear plugs to ride a bike, what I REALLY need is a quieter bike. My old America is a little loud, but not so much I need hearing protection. It is the loudest bike I have. ...J.D.
 

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When I need ear plugs to ride a bike, what I REALLY need is a quieter bike. My old America is a little loud, but not so much I need hearing protection. It is the loudest bike I have. ...J.D.
It's not the sound of my bike that concerns me.
I love its' sound and it poses no threat.
It's the air whistling through my helmet that concerns me, especially when my visor is down.
 

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I've learned recently about NRR - a metric of noise reduction used to compare hearing protection aids.

https://www.espamerica.com/what-is-a-noise-reduction-rating-nrr/

The ones you mention have NRR or just 16.

For example these ones http://www.howardleightveripro.com/earplugs/laser-lite somebody else recommended in this thread have NRR 32.
First - I have sensitive ears and tinnitus from being negligent in my youth. I would have physical pain and my ears would ring for days after concerts when I was younger.

NRR doesn't accurately reflect their ability and when riding, you need to be able to stay aware of what's going on around you. They reduce sounds by 21db. They are very popular with musicians who are exposed to very loud noises. I have worn mine to concerts, monster truck rallys, sporting events as well as riding and walked away from them with zero effect on my hearing. I can actually hear people around me with them in better than without wearing them.

Believe me - they work. They knock down the drumming of the wind and motorcycle and allow you to stay involved with what's going on around you.

You need to go past the NRR ratings.. SNR (signal to noise) is a better indicator.
 

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I just ran across this set with noise cancellation:

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/motikom/mplus-headphone-with-hdnctm-and-bt-intercom-for-bikers?utm_source=kickbooster-direct&utm_medium=kickbooster&utm_content=link&utm_campaign=dfbe871f

It's a Kickstarter project, so take that into consideration, but it does look interesting. Has 5 levels of noise cancellation, which you can set as you ride with a twist control, and it does the usual Bluetooth stuff.

';-)
Safety certainly seems to be a priority for them...
 

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I use a variety of different earplugs but there’s an important aspect to any of them: In order to insert them easily and effectively, you need to pull your ear out and back, maybe slightly up as you insert the plugs. With just a bit of experimenting you’ll soon get a feel for just how far out, back and up to get the opening and ear canal lined up just right.


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I use purpose-specific custom-molded earplugs. One set for motorcycling, one set for playing in a band, and one set for the shooting range. All are made by Westone, but each offers a different type of sound level attenuation. For example, the shooting earplugs reduce all sound frequencies equally and very heavily, but that's not what you want when riding, where you want to cut wind noise but still be able to hear emergency vehicle sirens and car horns. Custom-molding also provides a much better seal in the ear, and greater levels of noise reduction, across all earplug types.
 

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The only earplugs that work well (for me) are the foam ones shaped like a toadstool with a plastic shaft. Moisten the tip and shove it in your ear makes a sound seal. HOWEVER. I've got a boof head and when I put my helmet on it drags on the shaft and dislodges the earplug. To overcome this I got silicone moulded plugs that fit flush in your ear. These are boss until you get going whereupon they turn into bass boosters turning wind & engine noise into your own doof-doof house party. Also the silicone starts to irritate after a few hours. I've now resorted to a good windscreen with no plugs and sena intercom speakers so music drowns out the wind. (note it is not at eardrum splitting volume because of the windscreen). In short the best all-purpose plugs for me are the toadstool types but I just can't wear them in a helmet. If I want some shut-eye during a hurricane then the moulded silicone ones are best.
 

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Another +1 for the Howard Leight ear plugs.

Officially you're supposed to wet them with water to avoid infection, but like many other folk I mointen them in my mouth.

As well as the comfort and noise reduction, a big plus over the (often not so) cheap ear plugs is that the expand a little slower so you have more chance of inserting them.

In the UK I recently bought 200 pairs for £30 so I guess in the US that's about 20c per earplug. Not a massive investment!
You're supposed to wet them? Well that explains some things. Honeywell Laser Lites stay compressed just long enough but when my hands are real cold maybe a little moisture will help. Thanks for that tip!
 
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