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Did oil changes, coolant flush, brake flush, and a nice detail on both my bikes before moving them to storage for the winter. Put nearly 5000 miles on the Sprint ST since buying it in June! Thanks to the community for all the resources. Really love the bike.
 

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I removed the oxygen sensor from the exhaust pipe and 'disabled' it in the tune via TUNEecu. I also removed the Tridents and weighed them and then weighed the original standard muffler to get a comparison.
Standard: 6400g, + 490g for the trim piece = 6890g (6.9Kg)
Tridents: 5000g with Baffle, or -100g without Baffle = 4900g (4.9Kg).
While the fairings were off I gave the engine a good clean to remove the 'gunk' I usually can't get too.

Pro-Bolt have contacted us about the incorrect bolts being sent and a fix is in progress. The correct bolts are enroute and the wrong bolts will go back in a return envelope, so all good. The broken lug on the tail-fairing which was rebuilt using dissolved ABS and 'worked' with a soldering iron to smear the plastic together is holding up well (soldering iron used 24hrs after the dissolved ABS) and the Tail fairing went back on today.

I still have 6 days of "returned traveller isolation" to go, so I have to wait till next Saturday before I can take it out for a ride and see what difference removing the O2 sensor has made.

On Thursday KG's new exhaust cans for her Monster 796 arrived, so we were able to replace the original Ducati mufflers (6.8Kg) with "SC Project" mufflers (2.9Kg) and removed 3.9Kg from the tail of her bike. They also look less 'massive' and sound a lot better. It burbles like a Ducati should now.

Before (Standard): 20201002_Job Done.jpg After (SC Project): 20201029_SC Project.jpg

Cheers, Keef.
 

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Apologies for my ignorance, Cheef ... what's the benefit of disabling the O2 sensor? I'm guessing it restricts power, but please enlighten me. :)
 

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Bucket of worms...
Different ppl have different opinions about this topic. However my current opinion is influenced by an article I read some time ago about the necessity (and benefits) of catalytic converters,
Basically the article stated that without catalytic converters, we would all be travelling in/on gutless vehicles in order to comply with emission control laws. Catalytic converters are a good thing, which enable us to have nice toys.

But, in order for them to work, they need a constantly changing gas mixture going past them, otherwise they clog up (or something, I don't remember that bit exactly). The gas mixture must switch between high oxygen and low oxygen levels.
To achieve this the ECU's utilise an input from an O2 sensor in the exhaust, which signals to the ECU when the gas mixture has reached one of the two states. Say for instance, 'High' oxygen (or lean running) the ECU will then respond by adding slightly more fuel to the mix until the O2 sensor reports that the exhaust gas mixture is now low in oxygen (running rich) at which point the ECU will reduce the fuel in the mix to switch states and so on and so on.

This situation is good for emission reductions, because it keeps the cat functioning, but not good for maximum performance since it keeps changing air/fuel ratios, therefore the tune maps have sections that employ 'closed loop' running (where the feedback loop from the O2 sensor is used to adjust fuel ratio) such as idling and cruising, but revert to 'open loop' where the O2 feedback is ignored and the fuel mix is determined from the look-up tables only. The switch from closed to open loop is determined by a combination of throttle position, road speed, engine speed and maybe some more inputs indicating the operator wants maximum performance.

My bike is an Aus spec 2008, and was never fitted with a catalytic converter (or SAI). It also has Trident pipes and runs the TOR tune (designed for low restriction, cat-less exhausts), so it basically doesn't need the O2 sensor to preserve the non-existent cat. So I have removed the sensor, which de-restricts the exhaust a little and makes the bike a tiny bit lighter (60g lol). My bike will be running in open-loop mode permanently.

On bikes that normally have a cat fitted, the cat would restrict the exhaust flow more than the O2 sensor does, so unless you intend removing the cat there really is no point. A side benefit would be that the idle would smooth out a bit since the bike would be operating in open loop state, but this would ruin the cat.

Normally doing this would trigger a fault code (open or short cct O2 sensor heating cct) but disabling the sensor in the tune prevents this. (I saw this in action today before/after I disabled the sensor in TUNEecu).

cheers, Keef.
 

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My bike is an Aus spec 2008, and was never fitted with a catalytic converter (or SAI). It also has Trident pipes and runs the TOR tune (designed for low restriction, cat-less exhausts), so it basically doesn't need the O2 sensor to preserve the non-existent cat. So I have removed the sensor, which de-restricts the exhaust a little and makes the bike a tiny bit lighter (60g lol). My bike will be running in open-loop mode permanently.

On bikes that normally have a cat fitted, the cat would restrict the exhaust flow more than the O2 sensor does, so unless you intend removing the cat there really is no point. A side benefit would be that the idle would smooth out a bit since the bike would be operating in open loop state, but this would ruin the cat.
Thanks for the thorough explanation. I pretty much new it had to do with adjusting the fueling mixture, but I was thinking that removal would take away from altitude adjustments, not catalytic adjustment.
 

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It must be different on the Triumphs but on the Buells when an O2 sensor takes a dump the bike's performance falls on its face.
 

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Well I haven't ridden it in this state yet, that has to wait until next Saturday. I'll either like it or find a problem with it. If it doesn't work out I'll re-install the sensor and let everyone know.

I have looked in the engine management section of the service manual. Interestingly it explains where each of various sensors are, how they work and what they compensate for, all except the O2 sensor (known as the Lambda sensor) which only details the where and the what, ie:

Intake air temperature sensor: situated in the top of the airbox. As the density of the air (and therefore the amount of oxygen available to ignite the fuel) changes with temperature, an intake air temperature sensor is fitted. Changes in the air temperature (and therefore air density) compensated for by adjusting the amount of fuel injected to a level consistent with clean combustion emissions,

and:

Barometric pressure sensor - situated on the lower left hand side, at the front of the airbox. The barometric pressure sensor measures atmospheric air pressure. With this information, the amount of fuel per injection is adjusted to suit prevailing conditions.

But:

Lambda sensor - situated in the exhaust header system upstream of the catalyst. The lambda sensor constantly feeds information to the ECM on the content of the exhaust gases. Based on this information, adjustments to air/fuel ratio are made.

……OK, but why? Maybe some reason that has nothing to do with performance, since its performance benefits aren’t mentioned.
It seems that air temp, density and pressure are covered by the other two sensors.

I could be wrong, the bike might run like a dog. But next Saturday I'll know for sure.

Keef.
 

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On Thursday KG's new exhaust cans for her Monster 796 arrived, so we were able to replace the original Ducati mufflers (6.8Kg) with "SC Project" mufflers (2.9Kg) and removed 3.9Kg from the tail of her bike. They also look less 'massive' and sound a lot better. It burbles like a Ducati should now.

Before (Standard): View attachment 739410 After (SC Project): View attachment 739411

Cheers, Keef.
I do love the SC Project exhausts. Very well made, and you pay for that quality. I have a set of carbon high mount cans on my speedy. They're LIGHT



Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

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Combination of What did you do.. and Tires. I got a Michelin Road 5 (non-GT) mounted on my Sprint and took the bike out today to scrub off the mold release and build up to spirited riding. Surprise, there did not seem to be anything slippery on the tire. Either Michelin cleans it off, uses something else or Cycle Gear cleaned it off when they mounted the tire. In a mile or two I began to explore going further off center. In 5 miles I was comfortable doing whatever I wanted.

First impression after about 80 miles is that the Road 5 feels and handles like Pirelli Angels, easy steering without abrupt transitions and easy to make corrections in a curve. This is in comparison with a PR4 GT. No issues noted mixing a front Road 5 with a rear PR4 GT.

Time and miles will tell, but, so far, am pleased. I missed the feel of the Angels.

As an aside, M.C. Wheel Repair in Tucson did a great rim straightening job. Unfortunately, shipping cost more than the repair, but the total was much less than buying a new wheel. About $500US less. That buys a lot of fuel.
 

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Nobody has used mold release agents in years,
You also can’t go wrong with today’s tyres, it’s just finding the tyre that suits your riding style.
I like the Rosso III’s myself, but only get around 7000km out of the rear.
 

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Took it out for a fall ride, doing a variation on my usual Hudson River loop. I checked out a Triumph shop 'upstate' that's shiny and new, and filled with shiny new Triumphs, Aprilias and Moto Guzzis. I couldn't decide if I wanted the Scrambler 1200 or the "Moto 2 765" or the Aprilia Tuono V4, so I walked away empty handed. :p :ROFLMAO:
 
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Went on a 320km ride with friends North and South along the hill line. The bike ran fine with the O2 sensor removed and disabled. More than fine actually, it feels more responsive and keener for a blat. It transitions from cruising to accelerating without the tiny little lag that it used to have, its like it already wants to be accelerating.

cheers, Keef.
 

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The Weather forecast of rain all day kept us at home today, and a couple of times it poured down.

Instead we practiced pressing one of the drive-pins out of the old ST axle-flange to get the hang of the process before we try replacing the ones in the GT axle with titanium ones I bought from Titan Classics.
At the first attempt a couple of weeks ago I thought I could just undo the allen-head bolt from the rear of each pin and push them out, but as I found out later they are pressed in. I then found an old forum post where someone used a drift to get a broken one out and pressed a new one in with a vice.
That got me thinking and today I managed to press one of the ST axle ones out using two sockets and a vice. A small 6mm to press directly on the pin from one side and a larger 15mm to surround the pin without touching it on the other side to allow the vice jaw to apply pressure to the flange. Tightening the vice made the 6mm push the pin through the flange and into the space within the 15mm socket.
Once it was out it got the obligatory weighing, 18g versus 9g each for the new ones, so we'll be looking at a weight saving of 45g for the set of 5.

We didnt take pics today, I was more concerned that we didn't 'explode' any metal sockets and hurt ourselves. But since it all worked out nicely, we'll take some pics when we do the 'actual' job on the GT axle later.
We're hoping the weather clears tonight so we can go for a ride tomorrow. So the drive-pin replacement job will probably happen during the week.

cheers, Keef.
 

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I'm trying to visualize this whole affair but having a hard time, not owning a GT, or even a SSA (SSSA?) Sprint. :) When you do the GT take some photos.
 

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installed the NWS hugger on the 1050 yesterday. took the wheel off to make it easier.
Had a look at the OEM style hugger on the 955 - yep - re-cracking in the usual places due to the S%^t design -
right - take it off - some time with the angle grinder, hammer and drill and some 20x3 mm aluminium strip - plus some nuts and bolts and loctite
two alu bracing brackets to hold it around where the cracking occurs - to take the vibration and stress out of the plastic
quick bit of spray paint to make the alu back - mounted back onto the bike ready to go again -
maybe not quite as pretty - but should at least meet the functional criteria going forward.

Rayman
 

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installed the NWS hugger on the 1050 yesterday. took the wheel off to make it easier.
Had a look at the OEM style hugger on the 955 - yep - re-cracking in the usual places due to the S%^t design -
right - take it off - some time with the angle grinder, hammer and drill and some 20x3 mm aluminium strip - plus some nuts and bolts and loctite
two alu bracing brackets to hold it around where the cracking occurs - to take the vibration and stress out of the plastic
quick bit of spray paint to make the alu back - mounted back onto the bike ready to go again -
maybe not quite as pretty - but should at least meet the functional criteria going forward.

Rayman
It didn’t happen if no pictures produced.
 

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Oh, you’re talking about the relic :)
I’m actually looking for one as the rear of the motor and shock get incredibly dirty on wet dirt roads.
 

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first pics are for the 1050 - but the shitty OEM is yes on the Relic -
dont think there is an OEM for the 1050 ?

theres a good thread on the "best looking hugger" for the sprint - I went with the NWS as the shape fits and I'm only concerned about the shock - not so much the underside of the exhaust -
and dont want the CF look or some of the whale tongues - the NWS at least comes down to protect the linkages as well -
the Pyramid is probably the closest as they bought out NWS anyway - but I didnt want to pay new price.

Rayman
 
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