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Well Im still having trouble uploading picks but what I did yesterday was re manufactured the bars I made to look a little less "hand made" Just need to replace the 13mm nuts on the top with counter sunk Allen Heads and maybe paint them black, Not sure, Still not sure if they make a difference to the numb hand syndrome but feels a little more sporty, need to go for a decent ride soon.:rolleyes: Happy now , it's something I've been wanting to do ever since Chris did his conversion! Same ride height , slightly forward and different bar angle.
 

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Good luck, Aussie955i. I hope you get a job and home real fast!
 

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Thx mate mate hoping to get a van in a couple of weeks so i can put bike in back and just be a bit of a gypsy and live out of that on the 20 th of april im able to get some money out of my superannuation and don't want to get rid of the rs as I think it's an awesome ride and with all this corona crap would rather live away frim everyone im a lomer and like it like that lol
 

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To practice Social Distancing from my wife I took the crunched 04 RS out for a spin this evening.
I deem this "Essential Travel." Show this to the constable if you get pulled over next time.
 
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Today we went wabbit hunting, since we heard there was a chocolate covered bunny getting around. But even though we did a circle ride up over the local dam, along the hill line, back through some rural farmlands and finally ended up near one of our beaches.... we didn't spot any rabbits. So we ate some take-away fish and chips down on the foreshore instead (observing social distancing regulations and intent).

Actually the real purpose of the ride was to check out how my Sprint rides with the new fork springs fitted, which we installed over the last 3 days. We could have got it done quicker but Fridays temperature went over 35c (95f) and yesterday's hottest temp was 38c (100f). So we hibernated inside during the hottest part of the days.

The new springs are the ones recommended to me by the suspension shop we ordered our shocks from, based on an all up 'rider' weight of 120kgs, which is 21kg more than I actually weigh but allows for riding gear, topbox (7kg) and some luggage. According to the shop the OEM ST springs are progressives with a range of 0.68-0.92kg/mm and we have replaced them with Wilbers Promoto 0.80-1.00kg/mm progressives. See the pics below for a comparison:
20200410 Promoto vs ST.jpg 20200410 Low rate sections.jpg
The Promoto is on the left, the OEM is on the right, note the shorter length of the new spring's "soft" section which means there is less fork dive under braking. The ride is now definitely firmer, the bike travels over bumps evenly with no pitching motion, it just goes up and down and recovers very quickly.

We actually received the springs about 10 days ago, but the seal and bush kits didn't arrive until Thursday afternoon. Having now done the job, we can see that it would be possible to replace the springs without overhauling the whole fork, since the spring can be removed by just taking off the top-cap, but the forks we installed the springs into are from the 'spare bike' which has been sitting idle for 4 years and we decided to play it on the safe side. So now the forks have fresh bushes, seals, springs and oil.

The whole bike has been transformed over the last few months. It just flows over the rural roads, and reacts nicely when given a poke or put through some corners. This was also KG's first decent ride since installing her new shock, and she is also riding much more smoothly (and rapidly) than before.
Unfortunately most of the more interesting roads further east are now closed to us due to CV19 restrictions. Its gunna feel like a real long time till they open things up again, but we all gotta do what we gotta do to get it under control. I hope no-one 'here' has been affected by it.

Cheers, Keef.
 

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Little bit of maintenance over the last few days.

Started the rear hub and axle service on Thursday but my circlip pliers have disappeared so waiting for some new ones to arrive before I can complete the job. Bearings are in good order at 37k but i want to pull the hub to clean and grease the chain adjuster. Also waiting for new rear pads as they were lower than i expected.

Today I spent a little time fixing the right side tank trim. I'd managed to break one of the tabs off and the other one had been broken and lost a long time ago so I made a cast of the other side and created a new tab. Plastifix is awesome stuff!

Just waiting to get my GT nosecone back as I'd given to a bodywork guy for the final finishing after I'd fixed and painted. Unfortunately, lockdown came along so not sure when I'll have it back ?
 

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Rode Brigit, my silver Sprint, to work most of the week. I nearly have gotten the front tire to be round again. It was so badly squared off after my fall tour.

Today, after chasing chocolate, egg laying bunnies, I am actually attacking a problem of a four-wheeled variety. The trusty Ford has a bad injector. I can even touch the injector, but you have to dismantle the upper intake to get to it.

If that goes well, I promised to do some work on 'her' blue Sprint


Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

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.....Started the rear hub and axle service on Thursday but my circlip pliers have disappeared so waiting for some new ones to arrive before I can complete the job. Bearings are in good order at 37k but i want to pull the hub to clean and grease the chain adjuster. Also waiting for new rear pads as they were lower than i expected.......
See Roundawhile's suggestion from a few posts ago which will help make the job safer and easier

Place a broom handle or whatever you have up thru the axle first. Instead of flying off (usually aimed at your head or arm) it just spins on the handle. The head of the broom stops it going any further
Cheers, Keef
 

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Removed and replaced this today 2010 ST1050,anybody know what the procedure is for an attempted straighten out ? ?

View attachment 720202
I tried this arrangement yesterday on an old brake lever that looked about half as bad as yours. I've found that using a large shifter enables me to attach to things without 'gripping them' and therefore lowers the chance of leaving marks.
I placed the foot pedal section in the vice jaws, and used one foot to hold the vice down.
I adjusted the shifter's jaws to match the width of the little tab on the back of the pivot mount and placed it on there.
I then twisted the shifter back slowly and steadily. At first I wasn't sure if whether the pedal was just going to straighten, crack or twist-off.... I went and put safety boots and glasses on. On the first try I didn't twist far enough and the pedal just returned back to the bent position. On the second try I twisted it a little beyond the 'straight' position and when I relaxed the pressure it sat about right. A third twist and it ended up almost perfect. At this point I could see that the pedal was also bent a little 'inwards' as well as upwards, so I did a similar arrangement for the other axis and bent the pedal shaft outwards a little too.

20200412 Lever bending.jpg


I wasn't sure whether this would work or whether I would snap the lever, but decided to give it a go on this old lever and find out. For me it worked, however there is obviously no guarantee it will work for others or any idea whether it is a durable repair.
Good luck with yours if you haven't done it already.

Cheers, Keef.
 

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Mrs MHS would love having that purple bike, Bob

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Yeh thanks it is a very pretty color, getting a bit rough these days unfortunately and very difficult to touch up. Still gets a few looks which is nice but I'm starting to look at those 955s beautiful and cheap over here but alas at my age and income etc just a pipe dream to have two in the barn. Cheers hope youre all well. Bob
 

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I tried this arrangement yesterday on an old brake lever that looked about half as bad as yours. I've found that using a large shifter enables me to attach to things without 'gripping them' and therefore lowers the chance of leaving marks.
I placed the foot pedal section in the vice jaws, and used one foot to hold the vice down.
I adjusted the shifter's jaws to match the width of the little tab on the back of the pivot mount and placed it on there.
I then twisted the shifter back slowly and steadily. At first I wasn't sure if whether the pedal was just going to straighten, crack or twist-off.... I went and put safety boots and glasses on. On the first try I didn't twist far enough and the pedal just returned back to the bent position. On the second try I twisted it a little beyond the 'straight' position and when I relaxed the pressure it sat about right. A third twist and it ended up almost perfect. At this point I could see that the pedal was also bent a little 'inwards' as well as upwards, so I did a similar arrangement for the other axis and bent the pedal shaft outwards a little too.

I wasn't sure whether this would work or whether I would snap the lever, but decided to give it a go on this old lever and find out. For me it worked, however there is obviously no guarantee it will work for others or any idea whether it is a durable repair.
Good luck with yours if you haven't done it already.

Cheers, Keef.
You are lucky Keef. I straightened out the brake lever on my 2002 ST and it snapped in half. When I did it on my 2008 ST I used some heat and no problem at all. Heat is the trick.

Cheers,
Kap.
 
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Yeah I agree that adding heat is preferable, but I wanted to see if it was possible to do it without a heat source.
Next question: how much heat is required? People recommend a propane torch but would a Heat-Shrink gun provide enough heat? (Mine gets hot enough to melt solder - I've actually used it to solder large cables to terminals). Is it a case of any is better than none or is there a certain temperature that needs to be reached?'

Cheers, Keef.
 

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Enough heat so you don't need much effort to straighten it.
Cheers,
Kap.
 

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Enough heat so you don't need much effort to straighten it.
Cheers,
Kap.
The way I practice it: I scrub a piece of soap on the part to have it coated. When I heat the part up, I wait for the soap coating to start changing color (going darker/brownish). That's the right temp. I can straighten the part. In addition the soap is protecting the part from surface burning. Just have to wash it after is cools down.
 
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