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2019 T100
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147 Posts
Went for a quick spin around town. First decent day we've had in like a couple of months (at least when I wasn't working). Also my first ride with my jack be quick handlebar risers. It's a definite improvement. They're only a little under an inch tall, but they make a noticeable difference. The riding position is much more relaxed/neutral. Well worth the $50ish.
 

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I used the needle nose to lightly squeeze opposite sides of the retaining clip, it takes the pressure of the washer tightness against the little plastic peg and u just work it up and off nicely. If u are not careful and u try and pri them off u will break the plastic pegs and u won’t b happy. i made a little diagram showing how to use the needle nose to squeeze the sides of the washer where the arrows points are and shimmy it off.... hope this helps..
and I know I said the grills would look good black which they would but u have a lot of nice chrome on the bike and spraying the panel grills with a bright chrome spray wouldn’t look to bad either, it’s your bike do what makes sense and make u happy! ..... FTG
Thanks for the very clear explanation! I will try soon
 

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2019 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XC
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140 Posts
Looking forward to your review of the lowering springs ,
Saw them on the Tec site the other day and watched the video,but decided to wait until i've seen some reviews before taking the plunge
Haia all
OK, here goes... no photos as the Tec video shows it all and it doesn't look any different when installed.

A couple of interesting points whilst lowering my Scrambler 1200 XC.
The bike has just under 7,500 miles on it now.
The left shock was more resistant to being taken apart, I had to resort to a rubber hammer. There was a lot of aggregated dust which had set quite hard preventing the collar and circlips from moving.
The left-hand top shock mounting bolt has worn through the chrome showing the brassy base, the lower mount is OK. Rightly or wrongly I re-assembled them with Copaslip for some lubrication. There's very little rotational movement and the top pin goes back in the same orientation each time, so it's only going to wear further. I'm going to replace the top pins on both sides.
The Right-hand shock is both shielded and heated by the silencer so it came apart easily and had no dried gritty road muck in it. The top pin was much less worn than the left-hand one.
Swapping the shorter springs out for those supplied by Tec bike parts was a simple enough process.
Interestingly, the original springs had 'settled' and were shorter than the replacements, which are the same length (height?) as the originals were when new. The Tec springs are good quality, nicely finished and a smaller diameter bar; therefore lower strength / weight / poundage than the originals but the same height.
Everything went back together easily enough but I do have a centre stand and a scissor jack. I could not have lowered the front without the scissor jack as I wasn't strong enough to control the stanchion against the combined force of the spring and the weight of the bike otherwise.
There's only about 20mm of lowering available on the front stanchions and I set them at 16mm. I don't like the over-long brake lines as it is, so I certainly didn't want to bring them any nearer to the radiator on full compression.
Previously I could get the front part of my feet down, not on tip-toe but I wasn't really confident on the many, many off-camber, steep, rutted roads here.
After fitting Tec's springs and lowering the front I could get both feet down flat and I thought it was even a little too low. I'm 5' 10" with a 31" inseam and I weigh in at a wobbly 92kg.
There was also a clunk from the shocks when pushing the back of the bike down!
Oh NO, I thought... But:
Right from first getting the bike a year and a half ago there was a 'clunk' from the rear end over potholes. I could never find out what that was - until I took the shock springs off. The sliding carriage that separates the two springs has been hitting the plastic sleeving when the shorter spring has compressed enough...CLUNK!
There's wear inside those plastic sleeves as well. The user manual does state that those are a service item and will wear... Not worn enough to replace yet, methinks.
The longer spring have also 'settled' and when using the Tec springs without any preload, the shocks are too soft.
I put 8 turns of preload on to bring the back level with the front and everything has firmed up. There's now 85mm sag front and rear and as there's no preload on the front - this is back to the level as supplied new.
As a reference I had previously been running the bike with 70mm of sag front and rear using preload (target sag is 67mm) but the bike was still too tall for comfort.
To sum up; It's a relatively easy and inexpensive way to lower the bike. I've still got as much suspension travel as before and the whole bike is lower by around 20mm - maybe more or less, I didn't take a reference measurement.
I can now get both feet flat on the ground.
Haven't ridden it yet as the arctic conditions here have the roads covered in thick ice, although the snow has now gone...
Can't wait to try it out other than up and down my drive.
Hwyl
 

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Finished the final version of the bag supports - a bit more involved, but now mount above and below the frame-rail. 3mm aluminium bar, they're not going anywhere - strong enough to lift the rear of the bike. Had so file a recess in the ECU tray to make room for bottom bolt (circled in red). A couple of spacers made from 25mm nylon bar for alignment/support against the rail (full width at the rear down to half diameter at the front)

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Great work, mk2 version looks way better (y)
 

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2020 Bonneville T120 Black
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78 Posts
Finished the final version of the bag supports - a bit more involved, but now mount above and below the frame-rail. 3mm aluminium bar, they're not going anywhere - strong enough to lift the rear of the bike. Had so file a recess in the ECU tray to make room for bottom bolt (circled in red). A couple of spacers made from 25mm nylon bar for alignment/support against the rail (full width at the rear down to half diameter at the front)
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Looks really good! I my try that for my Bonnie.
 

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428 Posts
I replaced the TEC progressive springs on my 2018 T120 with a set of Race Tech springs ordered to my weight and riding style and an emulator. Much better than the TEC one-size-fits-all approach.
 

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Removed the shocks to replace the scraped up black shrouds with some clear protection film, similar to what was done with the later shocks. I know some had them replaced under warranty but I don't think there's much chance given its 4 1/2 yrs old and not purchased or serviced at a Triumph dealer.
I'd already sanded the shrouds down last year so the scraping wasn't as bad as before but still annoyed my OCD.
Used Rhino hide triple layer film, probably not as thick as the Ohlins version but we'll see how it lasts.
Sealed the spring with clear lacquer were the powder coating had worn away, hopefully it won't rub on the clear film, I'm assuming people with the newer shocks haven't had any issues.
Raised the circlip one groove while the springs were off, could never enough sag with the standard setting.
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Haia all
OK, here goes... no photos as the Tec video shows it all and it doesn't look any different when installed.

A couple of interesting points whilst lowering my Scrambler 1200 XC.)



Interesting data 2WG, I look forward to your report! I'm also 5'10" and find my XC just a wee bit tippy toe on rough roads, so losing 20mm might just make the difference, and I don't really need all the suspension travel- it was the riding position that sold the bike to me.
 

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2020 Bonneville T120 Black
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78 Posts
Bear in mind the bags I used tie direct to the frame rail (just like the old push-bike ones) to the brackets aren't taking the weight, just stopping the bags flapping around
Thanks. I’ve been trying to decide between fitted bags and throw over bags, and your solution would keep the throw overs from getting caught in something bad.
 

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2017 T120 Bonneville in Black
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725 Posts
Well at last got out on a bike today, not much mud left on my track to the road. Fully charged the Bonnie then decided to go out on the BSA, first time on a bike since 2nd December last year. Temperature wasn't too bad, maybe 56*- 60*F so just in jeans and summer jacket with its lining in etc as my leathers seemed to have "shrunk" in the wardrobe. :unsure:😂😂😂
Only allowed to travel in our Comarca ( more or less the same as an English Borough) but at least I did 47 miles and had a wonderful time in the winter sunshine.
 
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