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Discussion Starter #1
I know I know since I live in So Cali... it 'dosnt get cold" and "pffff you dont know what cold is"...lol...however my ride home on the hwy at 75mph in the light fog/mist and 43 degree got a bit "brisk". I have good overpants and a Killimanjaro jacket, but no cold /wet weather gloves as of yet. What do you suggest?

Thanks !
M
 

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I like the Tourmaster/Cortch line. I've tried a friend's Cortech Scarab winter gloves and I think I'll get those. Currently I use Tourmaster Aramid race gloves with silk liners which work well but it's kind of a pain to put two pairs of gloves on each hand every time.
There might be deals at the Cycle World show in Long Beach this weekend.
 

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Roadgear's "Boss" Glove. Just used mine yesterday with temps in the low 30"s. They too will be at the Cycle World Show this weekend.
 

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Triumph's Acton Glove

I just picked up a pair of these, have yet to try the waterproof qualities of them, but they are comfortable and warm. I switched off my heated grips and didn't get cold hands in 40 deg F for one hour. Drawstrings are mandatory for me as well as a squegee for the misty/foggy days.
 

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I haven't actually used any of these but I think the Tourmaster/Cortech line is good stuff for the comparative price. There might also be something at newenough.com in the "bargain basement" if memory serves me.
 

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Depends

On what you mean by cold.

I have four pairs of gloves for different conditions (yes I have as many jackets and pants too!)

For snowy and wet conditions I use these;

The Teknic "Thunder" glove. It is thinsulate lined and 100% water proof, I have warn them riding in the snow high in the mountains of NZ and in winter heavy NZ rain, very toasty.


They have a wiper blade on each fore finger.

The only negative is they are bulky but they are for very cold conditions.

DaveM:cool:
 

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I go through gloves. I hate paying for them, knowing they'll only last a season, 2 if I'm lucky, but I have to say the Rev'It gloves are the ones that stand out in my mind as being my faves for cold weather. I picked up a pair of Celsius PCMs at their sample sale last Spring, & I'm glad I did. They're way better than the Joe Rocket Blasters I had last Winter. They listed for about $150, but I got 'em for $40 at the sale.

Cheers,
-Kit
 

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Well they are not 'bike gloves' but for when it gets really cold I have a pair of goretex / thermopile climbing gloves by North Face that are really toasty and completely waterproof.

In the bad old days back in the UK I used to wear cotton inners inside my leather gauntlets and wooly mittens over top if it was really cold, not the most 'feedback providing' of combos, but as days out fishing in the winter proved, fairly effective at staying warmish for one on a strictly limited budget. That was back in the days before goretex, etc... but the leather kept the water out provided you polished / treated it on a regular basis.
 

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I just picked up a pair of these, have yet to try the waterproof qualities of them, but they are comfortable and warm. I switched off my heated grips and didn't get cold hands in 40 deg F for one hour. Drawstrings are mandatory for me as well as a squegee for the misty/foggy days.
For short hops in bad/cold weather, I still just use my Triumph Roadster gloves. Not totally waterproof (though I Nikwaxed them, which helps), but they do the job nicely at city speeds, and I get more feel and control for stop-and go braking and clutching.

For longer trips, I'm still using the $120 Triumph Expedition Sympatex gloves. The Expeditions are seriously warm and waterproof and come with a squeegee, but are more bulky than I like. They're well made though, and should last several seasons with care.

I like the idea of the drawstrings on those Action gloves, I've got smallish wrists attached to a big palm and stubby fingers (yeah, I'm a freak, so what?). Because of that, it's tough to find a glove that seals around the gauntlet as well as I'd like, since most of them use Velcro straps that's designed to be snug on a bigger wrist. Nobody is stocking them near me yet, and with my odd hands, trying on a new glove before buying is a must.

I did pick up the Action jacket a couple months ago, been my daily jacket since I got back from Australia, and picked up a set of the Action riding pants last weekend, which I promptly wore the 40 klicks home from the bike shop in 45f/8c pouring rain and stop and go traffic.

Both held up well, and no crotch leaking like I'd got wearing Joe Rocket Ballistic 5.0's on the way to the bike shop, and I was nice and warm (no heated grips either).

I'm really impressed with the new Action line from Triumph. Good quality for a very reasonable price (extra reasonable if you consider that they're boutique gear). Missing some of the bells and whistles of higher priced gear, but they get the job done, come in sizes that fit a fat 'merican, and are tastefully low key.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Final Update///

Hello all thanks for the great suggestions and ideas of what to look for. being a man of very limited funds I went with what seems the "best" I can get for the "best" $$.

I purchased these yesterday at CycleGear and rode them home last night. The temps were about 40deg F, I never once even aproached getting even cool, nor did any wind leak through to my hands at all. When they endure a bit of rain I will let you know how they fare.

http://www.cyclegear.com/spgm.cfm?L1=5000&L2=4&L3=139&L4=&item=FTL_MBG19-S_G&tier2=65

Thanks!

M
 

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I am glad you found some gloves.

Alright I read this thread and had to laugh at people recommending pretty much snowmobiling gloves for 43Degree riding.....

I wear a straight leather glove all year round that I can ride. I ride to about 38-39Degrees then I am done. I wear Alpinestar SP3 touring gloves. They are the best gloves I have owned. I treat them with boot dubbin to keep them waterproof and can wear them year round.

http://www.alpinestars.com/SP3_Gloves/pd/np/141/p/355836.html
 

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Gerbing Heated Gloves work great!
They are not completly water proof, but since they are electric heated, if your hands get cold from being wet, just crank up the heat. I like them because they have the warmth without the bulk.



http://www.gerbing.com/Products/Gloves/G3.html
Been thinking about heated gloves. How do you hook them up without the rest of the heated clothing? I would probably only want gloves for most of my missions in the southern climate.

Thanks.
 

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Been thinking about heated gloves. How do you hook them up without the rest of the heated clothing? I would probably only want gloves for most of my missions in the southern climate.

Thanks.
They do come with a wire that you can use to connect the gloves without using the heat jacket liner. It run down your sleeves (kind of like the straps mom used to make you wear so you wouldn't loose your mittens :) ) and connects to the thermostat.
I love them. They work great.
 

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As an alternative, I prefer insulated handlebar muffs, also known as poagies, handlebar mitts, and hippo hands (tm).

They allow the use of lightweight year-round leather gloves and create an air pocket that provides warmth, with or
without heated grips, and they keep my gloves dry.

Mine are 17 years old, and are still in excellent shape. Search the web for commerical muffs, or make your own.

They strap on just past the control switches on the bars, and don't interfere with normal operation. They do take a bit of time
to get used to, but with a fair trial period their use will become second natured.

I started using lightweight nylon poagies over 30 years ago for winter kayaking, and that led to my use of the motorcycle
version years later.

The temps here were -23C (-9F) on Tuesday night, so this is definately a cold weather riding locale.

Dimensions are 16" X 10" for these insulated nylon poagies


Sprint with heated grips and poagies


Aprilia with poagies / no heated grips


Poagies... I don't leave home without them...especially at 12,000ft
 
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