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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My garage is set up for Japanese sportbikes. I have a Pit Bull standard rear stand, a DMP S-Spec triple lift, a Baxley Sport chock, a Harbor Freight motorcycle lift and a No-Mar Classic tire changer. All have served me valiantly and I consider them indispensable.

Things have changed and I’m probably headed towards a T-100. I’m a bigger guy, about 210 lbs, so in addition to maintenance I need to lift the bike to address the suspension. I need some help with equipment, please.

It appears my Pit Bull rear stand will work. I’ve always found a way to get jack stands under the frame or reversed foot pegs when changing shocks. I assume my S-Spec front stand will work but so far I’m not finding the proper pin size.

My Baxley chock is designed for a 120/70-17. Per their website it will also work on a 110 tire and 16” rims. I’m guessing it won’t work on a 100/90-19. Like an idiot I sold a Condor stand a couple of years ago.

Any information would be gladly appreciated. I’m using the heck out of the Search function but this place reminds me a bit of the SV forum – gads of information to the point of overload!
 

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If you are truly 210 lbs then don't get crazy with the suspension. Stock height works just fine. Mine is set at stock height and I weigh 205 lbs.
I'm currently running Ikon springs in the front and Ikon shocks in the rear. Works good for me.

Now for the tire changer, I go to the local Harley dealer. For the jack I have a Craftsman bike jack.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Wenzel, by 210-lbs I mean was as high as 230, currently at 212, would like to be at 200 but can’t seem to get under 207. :laugh2: Ikon shocks in the rear and springs up front is exactly the setup that I’m looking at.

I’ve watching You Tubes on changing tube tires and maintaining spoke wheels. I’m not too fired up about it – changing tubeless tires on cast wheels is so easy - but I’m sure I can get the hang of it.

Could you tell me more about your Craftsman bike jack, please? About the only thing I don’t like about my Harbor Freight is how much space it takes up. Stability on the frame jack designs make me uneasy but I don’t know anyone who has one so I’ve never seen one in use. Are you happy with it?
 

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Jack it up

pearsonm;7895745 I’ve watching You Tubes on changing tube tires and maintaining spoke wheels. I’m not too fired up about it – changing tubeless tires on cast wheels is so easy - but I’m sure I can get the hang of it. Could you tell me more about your Craftsman bike jack said:
Mr. pearsonm,

My good friend Alex, whose screen name is CB200T has a NO-Mar, and loves it for use on his T100. He also owns a Craftsman jack. I recently visited him, and while there we worked on his bike, up on the lift without issue. We changed the gaskets from the crankcase up, due to a leaking head gasket and also the fork gaiters.

Dealing with tubes is just more time consuming and requires more caution, but as with all mechanics, practice makes better.

Namaste,
Charles
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you for the photo, Charles. Looks like he has at least two ratchet straps securing the bike. I don’t have as much open space as your friend so I was concerned about knocking the bike over.
 

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My Craftsman looks like the Harbor Freight one. It helps to have the long handle I would imagine. Mine doesn't have that. Mine held up a HD Ultra Classic for 2 weeks. If I have to leave mine up while I'm away I put bricks under it and let it down on them.


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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Thank you for the photo, Charles. Looks like he has at least two ratchet straps securing the bike. I don’t have as much open space as your friend so I was concerned about knocking the bike over.
You are correct. We worked on the bike with it tied to the lift. It was no big deal to move the entire bike using the lift's wheels. Of course when your not working on the scoot it can be lowered, making the center of gravity lower and safer.

When you get a T100, adding or having a center stand makes it very easy to work on, Front or Rear, except of course it's almost on the ground. It's easy with a small bottle jack to lift on the front of the frame to get the front wheel off the ground and then slide appropriately sized wood blocks under the frame.

I'm very fortunate when it comes to bike work, as I bought a air powered Handy Lift in the early 90's. That and a chain fall above, make any scoot work a snap, as far as access.

Charles
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
When you get a T100, adding or having a center stand makes it very easy to work on, Front or Rear, except of course it's almost on the ground. It's easy with a small bottle jack to lift on the front of the frame to get the front wheel off the ground and then slide appropriately sized wood blocks under the frame.
A rear stand and my H-F lift would probably take care of all my needs. It would be nice if my Baxley stand works – I park my bike on the lift so a chock and swingarm stand makes things easy when I’m doing anything other than tire changes or suspension work.
 
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