Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,141 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
.....you're going to go down. And we did today.On a short,rocky,off camber uphill,the rear wheel started sliding,then caught in the rocks,and spit me off the high side.Which,in this case,was the low side.I went to the bottom of the hill.The Scrambler stayed near the top,sliding down only 3 or 4 feet.Gas tank and seat pointing towards the foot of the hill,tyres pointing up.

Had to go back up,and dig the left side bar out of the rocks.By the time I got it dug out,the Scrambler had been laying upside down for about 10 minutes.I could smell gas,but didn't see anything dripping.Got the bar dug out,only to find the clutch lever broken.(**Here's an old dirt bikers trick:Leave your lever perches just a little loose.Then,maybe the perch will spin on the bar,rather than breaking the lever.Didn't work this time**:rolleyes:)Then I had to wrestle the bike around until the wheels were pointing downhill,before I could get her on her feet again.

She started right up,but didn't want to idle at first.A few minutes of feathering the throttle,and by the time I got my gear back on,she seemed to be running OK. Then,I had to ride home with no clutch lever.It was no problem,as long as I was in the dirt,but got interesting when I got back to tarmac.Fortunately,I only had to go a few blocks,with only one busy intersection.I do not recommend this activity!

I am unscathed,other than a sore rear end,which landed on a rock,and a wrenched back,from wrestling with the bike on the hillside.I think I would have a sore elbow too,had I not been wearing CE armor.

Unfortunately,the Scrambler suffered a few scars.Besides the clutch lever, and the corresponding grip,the primary cover,the side cover,and parts of the frame are badly scratched.Everything else seems OK,and the gas tank somehow managed to escape the rocks,so it's not as bad as it could have been.I'll look her over closer in the next few days,and try to post some pics.

Oh well,I was thinking about pulling that cover off and polishing it anyway......

So,anybody know of a good place to get levers for these things? Preferably,some Magura-types,that will bend,instead of break.

:beerchug:
Cheers!
Bruce
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
235 Posts
OUCH. Glad you (and the tank) are ok - but sounds like an adventure!

Hope you got some pics of the bike off road, too. I'm going tomorrow for my first real day out in the dirt, so I'm a little worried about how well she'll do. I don't have any handguards yet...which definitely worries me...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Glad to hear you're not too hurt!

Think of it this way: Imagine all the "adventure" bikes out there that will never feel dirt under their tires. Your Scram got to know the touch of nature (literally) before she went down, so it's fitting in a way.

Just my half-witted opinion! :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,141 Posts
Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Thanks,Merkava and Mudhen.I'm glad I'm OK too!:D


I don't have any handguards yet...which definitely worries me...
Handguards.............Duh.Well,it's now confirmed.I'm a complete idiot.Those were not even on my list of mods,but they are now at the top.Thank you.

Don't worry Mudhen.She'll do just fine.She'll do exactly what she's designed to do.If you're a dirt biker,you need to make a mental adjustment for the weight,the tyres,and the suspension.

*********************************

So,I called all three of our local Triumph dealers today,and of course,none of them stocks the lever.That is simply ludicrous,not to stock a common replacement part,that can be replaced in 5 minutes,but completely disables the motorcycle when it breaks.Special order,7 days.Which means at least two weekends without my bike,for a stupid broken lever! :animad:

Two of the dealers quoted me $29.10,which according to Bike Bandit is the correct price.The other dealer,Arizona Superbikes(AZSBK) quoted me $38.75. No wonder AZSBKs reputation is in the toilet with my local Rat Pack.:rolleyes:

Rant over.Now I need to know if anyone has a source for good quality malleable levers for these things? Even better, does anyone know of a lever from another brand of bike that can be substituted?

:beerchug:
Cheers!
Bruce
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
don't have answers to your specific questions but a mail-order house might have something to you before a special-order comes in to one of your dealers. then again maybe not... but worth trying something like madss since they have oem parts.

another thought - take the remains of what you have to a salvage yard or a dealer of other makes to see if they have something comparable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,251 Posts
Thanks,Merkava and Mudhen.I'm glad I'm OK too!:D




Handguards.............Duh.Well,it's now confirmed.I'm a complete idiot.Those were not even on my list of mods,but they are now at the top.Thank you.

Don't worry Mudhen.She'll do just fine.She'll do exactly what she's designed to do.If you're a dirt biker,you need to make a mental adjustment for the weight,the tyres,and the suspension.

*********************************

So,I called all three of our local Triumph dealers today,and of course,none of them stocks the lever.That is simply ludicrous,not to stock a common replacement part,that can be replaced in 5 minutes,but completely disables the motorcycle when it breaks.Special order,7 days.Which means at least two weekends without my bike,for a stupid broken lever! :animad:

Two of the dealers quoted me $29.10,which according to Bike Bandit is the correct price.The other dealer,Arizona Superbikes(AZSBK) quoted me $38.75. No wonder AZSBKs reputation is in the toilet with my local Rat Pack.:rolleyes:

Rant over.Now I need to know if anyone has a source for good quality malleable levers for these things? Even better, does anyone know of a lever from another brand of bike that can be substituted?

:beerchug:
Cheers!
Bruce
Sorry about your spill, at least you ain't broke too. Call Baxter Cycle, 1-712-781-2351, they can have a lever to you within a week at probably a cheaper price to boot too.

Greg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,200 Posts
clutch lever

When I dumped and broke the clutch lever, I had a bit of a wait too, almost ten days....but remembering what I saw on the board, I took the time to order two, now there is a brand new one hanging on the garage wall and a new one on the bike....which, if all goes according to plan, should forestall the one on the bike from ever breaking again.
Back some years ago, I was at the flat tracks in daytona, about 20 miles from the campsite, it started to rain like hell, no rain suit, packing my ladyfriend, and got on, fired it up, and pow, clutch cable broke right at the lever end......ended up stripping the outer housing back with my pocketknife, tied a loop in the inside cable, and wrapped that around my hand....and that's how I go er home.....through moderately heavy traffic and a blinding rainstorm....
And then....try and find a **** clutch cable in the middle of bike week......hahahahahahaha...rode it the rest of the week that way....
That's why i ordered two.....
Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
319 Posts
Glad to hear you are OK and that the bike is not too damaged.
You may want to consider a bashplate and engine guards - the Triumph aftermarket ones work,
tho the lower bar would benefit from an added spacer bar.
For handguards, Acerbis make a number of options.
Finally you may want to replace the footpegs with some off-road made for you.
Here's a link to some work I did preparing mine for the sticky stuff.
http://www.triumphrat.net/triumph-twins-hangout/64512-scrambler-stealth-project.html?highlight=stealth+project
Anyway wishing you well and look forward to hearing more of your exploits.
Cheers
Rhodie
Bangkok
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
Glad you are OK, Commando.
When my bike fell over in the parking lot and broke the clutch lever, I duct taped the sparkplug socket to the remaining stub, and rode with it for several days until I found a dealer that had a replacement lever. Another good reason to have duct tape in the saddlebag!
Norse
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,141 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Koifarm- Yes,you are absolutely right, I intend to get 2.And for exactly the reason you gave.As long as I have a spare I will never need it! I always used to keep extra cables and so forth around for my classic bikes,back when stuff like that was hard to come by.Now it's easier to find the old stuff than it is for the new ones.

Rhodie! Good to hear from you. Have you been missing in action,or did I just miss seeing your posts? Did you make your trip through Cambodia,and Laos yet?

A bashplate (skidplates,we call them here) was my next mod anyway,once I found out the Scrambler is,in fact, off-road worthy.I have considered the engine guards,but I'm not crazy about adding weight to an already heavy bike.However,after seeing what the rocks did to my primary cover,I'm reconsidering.They wouldn't have stopped the scratching,but the bash could have been a lot worse.I'd like to come up with some kind of rock guard for the oil cooler too.The stock pegs work OK,as long as they stay dry,and there is no water in AZ.It has to be imported from out of state.But,I'll replace them anyway eventually.And hand guards are now on the top of the list.

:beerchug:
Cheers!
Bruce
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
319 Posts
CR
Pleased to hear that at the very least your enthusiasm has not diminished in making the Scrambler scramble.

As for myself have not been missing in action - rather tearing my hair out awaiting the slow wheels of Thai bureaucracy turn in producing the paperwork following homologation [passed] that would allow for a number plate to be fitted & rego docs.
Only then can I go cross border.
In the meantime I had my 15 yr old kid over and had him trained up on XRs
before setting off on a 2000km trip around Laos - sensational!

Sadly would have loved to have taken the Trumpet - tho picking up an XR is easier!

Also taken the beamer for a quick x-border foray.
But still don't know when I can go truly Scrambling.

Re weight - you are correct in trying to keep the bike a light as possible.
When I first got it, I was rather dismayed by its bulk - but freeing up the power helps.
Also, having been down the road with the guards and bashplate truly protecting the engine,
I believe [for me] it's an essential compromise + the weight is low down.

The oil rad guard I have, can easily be made up by some local metal worker if you are concerned.
You may also want to lengthen & possibly raise your front mudguard as well - I had to fabricate mine out of steel.

YSS the shock people have been working on my suspension and so far appear to have found a solution,
without the need for a different front end or raising the back ridiculously high.
But until I can go on some Cambo red roads etc - I cannot fully vouch for them yet.
But they have sorted out the high speed weave [75mph+ with kit] I was encountering and can handle the dubious Thai potholed asphelt.
YSS's aim is to provide an affordable high quality aftermarket option for all the Classic range.
As they have German TUV status and German, Dutch & Aussies working on this,
I think they may have a package that we can all afford before too long.

I'd be interested to hear your investigations re levers as I think they may need replacing.
Also not convinced that my ft brake cylinder reservoir is big enough for the 6-pots ft brake.
Also the reservoir is very exposed exposed.

Re the rear the centre stand is a problem catching the chain - not to mention the odd clanging at times.
But the hoped-for relocation of rear brake using the America bracket doesn't appear to be the solution. I think Tri-boy was making investigations. Certainly the EBC dic appears the answer rather than exchange OE warped disc for another.
etc...
Riding this bike appears to be an exploration in product testing!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,141 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Nope,Rhodie,no diminished enthusiasm here!
This is why I bought the Scrambler.I know I
could have found a more dirt worthy street
bike,but I wanted a Triumph.I have been riding
them a long time,you see.Just stubborn
I guess.I might have ended up with
a Steamer,had they not been castrated.
Also,I have been trail riding big road bikes
for a long time,starting with my 1971
R75/5(way before anyone thought of a GS).
The look on the faces of the other riders
I met on the trail was priceless,when they
saw me 25 miles from pavement on a
vintage looking bike with a nacelled
headlight,and shielded shocks!

I don't think you need to worry about
the ft. m/cyl reservoir capacity.Once the
caliper, brake lines,and m/cyl are bled,it
only needs to hold enough fluid to compensate
for pad wear. Many small cars have reservoirs
of a similar size. I agree,it is in a very
vulnerable position.This was a concern for me
even before I bought the bike,since I knew I
would be using it off-road.I was thinking that
had I dropped the bike on the right side,instead
of the left,it would have been the m/cyl buried
in the rocks! I shudder to think what might have
happened to the reservior. If it's any comfort,
the mount looks like it will bend fairly easily,
possibly allowing the res.to move out of harms
way,rather than break off,like the rigid mounts
seen on some other bikes.

The rear caliper is in a very vulnerable spot,and
I'd be interested to see a relocation solution.

My centrestand has not yet fouled my chain,or
at least,there is no evidence of it,and I have
watched it closely,because when I first installed
the stand,I thought sure the chain would rub on it.
There seems to be some variance in build quality,or
tolerance,in the stand,or mounting,because some
people are having problems,and some are not.
Any little rattles or clanks I may have experience
are certainly offset by the importance of
this piece of equipment on any heavy motorcycle
that will be repaired away from a nicely equipped
shop someday. Which, I can almost guarantee,
both of our machines will be,at some point.

I'm actually pretty happy with the power,at
least off road,but I'm going to drop a tooth
or two on the countershaft,to give it a little
more plonk ability.
I need to get the carby dialed in a bit better
too,to crisp up the throttle response.
I wish you had ridden your bike before the
Thunderbike cams were done,so you could
give us a before and after evaluation.I've
seen the dyno charts,but they are no substitute
for seat of the pants comparison.

I've been looking at the YSS stuff too,but I
don't know much about it.It will be interesting
to know what you finally come up with.Especially
regarding extra travel. Do you have any posts
anywhere that go into detail about what you have done?
:beerchug:
Cheers!
Bruce
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
319 Posts
Takes me back a bit - R75 off-roading!

Triumph Motorcycle Master Cylinder Reservoir
I'm using the expensive little black fella from British Customs.
Just need to keep an eye on levels as pads wear down.
Thinking about fabricating a protective bracket or maybe modifying a Touratech one.

The rear calliper is an issue, tho the centre stand does provide some protection.
Totally agree with you, that even tho carrying yet more ironmongery around, it is worth the benefits.
Will be welding a sliver 2-3mm to the stop & using a bungy to hold it in place on long runs.

I've played around with getting the carbs right - at one stage I was getting 85mpg! The lads at the dealership had only put one of the dynojet springs in one of the carbs - "err sorry we forgot!" Now have an Aussie ducati-breathing techie who has them purring just right.

Tho he's trying to persuade me that Keihen FCRs would be even better!!
Just that I need the distance as much where fuel availability is sometimes uncertain.

I must try out a stock Scrambler to compare.
Only the dealer has none left - a new shipment comes in November so there maybe a chance to ride one then.

I read somewhere that someone is going to try running a 16tooth front sprocket - was that you?
I'm certainly interested to see how that would work out.

Similarly, the rear brake bracket & front brake rotors, not to mention the Holy Grail of spoked tubeless rims!
All these things still on my mind.

My next goal on this site is a quick post about an enlarged rack on the solo-seat as an option to creating a set of pannier braces.
That was my original aim, but the Thunderbike cans protrude too much.
Staintunes or TORs seem the way to go if that's what you want.

Also a report on the work YSS did for me.
I was blown away by their QC - vid cams over each assembly bay so they can trace each individual shock back
and watch its construction should there be a problem.
It also concentrates the assembly worker's mind!
Honda, Kawasaki & Suzuki use them for their high-end small-run [500 units] sport bikes.

If I have the time & there is interest, I will try & consolidate the progressive work that I have posted,
mainly to others' threads, on the project.
Really I would rather be posting a trip report on the planned 3k rumble thru SEA!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,435 Posts
So,I called all three of our local Triumph dealers today,and of course,none of them stocks the lever.That is simply ludicrous,not to stock a common replacement part,that can be replaced in 5 minutes,but completely disables the motorcycle when it breaks.
If it makes you feel any better, I dropped my Honda XR650L in the mud a month or two ago while riding a woods trail and broke the front brake lever. The Honda dealer also did not stock that part and had no aftermarket ones that would fit. This seems especially ludicrous for a bike that is fully intended to be bashed around in the dirt.

Rhodie said:
In the meantime I had my 15 yr old kid over and had him trained up on XRs before setting off on a 2000km trip around Laos - sensational!
Holy ©[email protected]! Touring around a foreign country at age 15? Luckiest kid ever!

--mark
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,150 Posts
If you want a really tough bashplate, check out the ones at Thunderbike NZ's website. They're twice the size & thickness of the Triumph unit. I wish I'd seen it before buying mine. Although there's nothing wrong with it. & mine's already payed for itself many times over, diverting rocks away from my sump. & likewise, my engine dresser bars have saved my casings from the kind of damage yours endured, on more than one occasion too. So I'd definitely put them on your mods list too.
Glad you & the bike are repairable, & I hope you're both back out there, scramblin' through the desert, asap
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
235 Posts
I read somewhere that someone is going to try running a 16tooth front sprocket - was that you?
That may have been me. I've been running the 16t for about 1500 miles, and ran it last weekend on my off road ride and it worked well. I'd still prefer it lower...but not sure what that would do to my highway ride. Right now, if I can keep it to 70mph, I can still get 40mpg. No idea what RPMs I'm pushing at that point...

In the spring I'll probably try to go up a couple teeth in the back...I don't know that I'd want to drop to a 15t on the front, for fear of drastically reducing my chain life (if that's really true).

Pat
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
319 Posts
16 Tooth front sprocket

Mudhen
Good to hear that it is proving useful
What adjustments were necessary - chain? rear sprocket?
Can you remind me of your suspension set up - front & rear?
Thanks
Rhodie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
235 Posts
Mudhen
Good to hear that it is proving useful
What adjustments were necessary - chain? rear sprocket?
Can you remind me of your suspension set up - front & rear?
Thanks
Rhodie
No modifications necessary...the adjuster can take up more than that amount of slack - my guess is you could put a 15t on it without having to remove a link from the chain. I swapped back to the 18t this morning before riding to work - took me about 15 minutes. I'd like to hope I'd get better gas mileage....but I doubt it - because I just seem to ride faster...

My suspension is bone stock.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top