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I have a few odds and ends to weld on my T100 and have borrowed a small MIG welder from a friend.

In the 80's I tried to learn stick welding and could only manage to immediately and quite seriously attach the stick to the metal - no welding at all...

This wire-feed gizmo is much easier to use - I've watched some videos on YouTube and succeeded in attaching some nails and hex nuts to angle iron - but most of the welds look pretty crappy. I've fiddled with the amps and feed speed and seem to have that about as good as I can (at least welding is happening) but I wonder if adding 'shielding gas' to the operation is worth the additional $100 or so it will cost.

What are your thoughts on using flux-core vs. gas? Worth spending the money?

Thanks,
 

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absolutely worth it ! use c25 gas and you have to reverse the polarity on your welder .

did your welder come setup to take gas , come with the gauge and hose etc ?

Woody
 

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I have learned that the proper shielding gas is worth its weight in gold. The right shielding gas can help an amateur look like he knows what he's doing.

This especially applies when welding aluminum. I'm pretty sure you won't have that in your future, but if you do, be forewarned.
 

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I have learned that the proper shielding gas is worth its weight in gold. The right shielding gas can help an amateur look like he knows what he's doing.

This especially applies when welding aluminum. I'm pretty sure you won't have that in your future, but if you do, be forewarned.
I am currently looking at buying a tig welder that will also do stick welding. For fine stuff tig is the way to go. It so happens that you dont -HAVE- to use dc for aluminium as it prefers a near 50/50 polarity. 50 part for welding/heating and the other 50 for keeping the work area clean.

The trick is having enough power to keep an arc struck. More power makes it easier but is more inclined to blow holes in the work. You need to have the right sized rod for the workpiece and then use enough power to get a good penetration without blowing holes, or without running too cold so it does not penetrate. You want a finished surface that tends toward concave, not convex.
Using gas is cheaper if you weld a lot. for very occasional use the flux coated rods are ok, but gas gives a better weld. Also using gas gives a greater range of welding materials. For critical welds I sometimes will buy expensive rods ( eutectic) which welds/flows better than mild steel.
 

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Looseparts,

Oh yes, gas is the way to go for a beginner. Now for style of
welding. Something that is just learned. Try a few beads on
some scrap metal. And when making the bead. move the welding
head in a small crescent moon shape, working back and forth,
moving every so slightly forward each time. This shall help you
out with making a nice bead. Also higher watts will give a deeper
weld, but remember, parts can only take so much.

Finally prep, just like painting, prep, prep, prep = nice welds.

Pookybear
 
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