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I thought the problem is the shift lever is stronger than the gear selector on the earlier water cooled twins. Dropping the bike at a stand still could easily damage the gear mechanism, because the shift lever will not bend. I remember reading about this problem in a Triumph Form shortly after I bought my 17 Street Twin.
I installed engine guards to protect the shift lever from hitting the ground. A shift lever made of softer metal might be an option.
After watching the Stuart video I was convinced for three days that I have a "ticking time bomb" in my garage.
12,000 trouble free miles on my Street Twin.
 

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I'd love to know out of all T120's sold, how many it affects? And whether it's only T120's? Aren't all 6 sp WC gearboxes the same?
 

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I thought the problem is the shift lever is stronger than the gear selector on the earlier water cooled twins. Dropping the bike at a stand still could easily damage the gear mechanism, because the shift lever will not bend. I remember reading about this problem in a Triumph Form shortly after I bought my 17 Street Twin.
I installed engine guards to protect the shift lever from hitting the ground. A shift lever made of softer metal might be an option.
After watching the Stuart video I was convinced for three days that I have a "ticking time bomb" in my garage.
12,000 trouble free miles on my Street Twin.
Hi mate, what type of engine guards did you install ?
 

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Aren’t people having issues who definitely didn’t drop their bikes?

You could always weaken the lever by drilling or cutting allowing it to break and prevent internal damage.
 

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Hey Twin Phil
I installed the Hepco Becker engine guards. I just liked the look for my Street Twin.

Burren Boyo you have a good point. Some people are having problems with the gear selector and the bike was never dropped.
If there is an after market upgrade, or if Triumph re-designed the gear mechanism I would consider getting repair. I get a little
obsessive compulsive with my bike.
 

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It’s annoying the dealership have to charge so much. The price does not equal the service they provide.
I don't know that I totally agree with that.

The dealer has to employ a service writer/parts manager to work with you to isolate the problem you are having. Then they have to book you in and do the paperwork and schedule your bike through the shop's workflow obtaining spares from Triumph as necessary.

Then the technician in this particular repair case has to remove the engine side cover, clean and polish the gasket surfaces. Then he or she has to remove everything needed to get behind the clutch basket to get the shift assembly out. Then they have to inspect and or measure the offending parts in order fix the issue. They subsequently have to put it all back together, torqued correctly, do an oil and filter change and an overall safety check of your bike. They also probably have to put it on their dealer scan tool to check for any fault codes and ECU updates. The lead technician then has to overview the work they have done and sign off on it. Then they take it for a decent test ride to ensure they have really fixed your issues and make sure the bike runs correctly and is safe to be on the road.

The service writer has to go over all of the work they performed for you, explain what was done, explain any further work they consider might be necessary, and bill you out.

Not surprisingly Triumph has set standards for their service bays, such as the minimum size of the workshop, the training the technicians must receive, the factory tools they must buy and so forth. Then there is the mortgage or rent on the facility, the utilities, the technicians and service writers pay checks, relevant taxes and health insurance, liability insurance, the purchase and depreciation of the spares inventory, the list goes on and on. The technicians must be paid a going rate for their skills, such as the ability to diagnose both complex mechanical and electronics problems for a wide variety of motorcycle models and types, even just for one brand. If it takes a long time to repair your bike they might even have to pay for the overhead of giving you a lift to somewhere you need to go, or even give you a loaner motorcycle.

So, considering all that, I think it is a wonder anyone makes any money at all running a dealership service department, especially if you live where the bulk of the work is seasonal in nature. I've always been very happy with my mine. No, they are not cheap for sure, but motorcycles these days are complex systems and when they go wrong they are often equally complex to diagnose and fix.

Now your dealership service department where you live might not be good value for money, but the ones I use generally do a very professional and reliable job for which I am willing to pay just a little more money for. And no, I'm definitely not rich and I can't afford to throw money away either. However, I have to remind myself that they are a business and have to return some kind of profit at the end of the day on what is an expensive business to establish and run. However, for me, it is mainly that I just want to be confident that when I leave the dealership, and get out onto the open road, that everything works as it should. I have to remind myself that cheap shoddy workmanship can be very very expensive.
 

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Well said mecsw500. Too true. Business profitability is not easy. Been there, done that. Lost me house. Not nice. I would still like to now how many this gear selector issue affects, & whether it's T120 only. I saw a survey on the Triumph Bonneville site on facebook where only 3 or 4 had the problem, & 96 (I think didn't) I know that's probably not very accurate FWIW, but that's all I've ever seen on numbers. And I don't know where FIllingham got his numbers from. In fact I don't recall seeing any!!
 

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I don't know that I totally agree with that.

The dealer has to employ a service writer/parts manager to work with you to isolate the problem you are having. Then they have to book you in and do the paperwork and schedule your bike through the shop's workflow obtaining spares from Triumph as necessary.

Then the technician in this particular repair case has to remove the engine side cover, clean and polish the gasket surfaces. Then he or she has to remove everything needed to get behind the clutch basket to get the shift assembly out. Then they have to inspect and or measure the offending parts in order fix the issue. They subsequently have to put it all back together, torqued correctly, do an oil and filter change and an overall safety check of your bike. They also probably have to put it on their dealer scan tool to check for any fault codes and ECU updates. The lead technician then has to overview the work they have done and sign off on it. Then they take it for a decent test ride to ensure they have really fixed your issues and make sure the bike runs correctly and is safe to be on the road.

The service writer has to go over all of the work they performed for you, explain what was done, explain any further work they consider might be necessary, and bill you out.

Not surprisingly Triumph has set standards for their service bays, such as the minimum size of the workshop, the training the technicians must receive, the factory tools they must buy and so forth. Then there is the mortgage or rent on the facility, the utilities, the technicians and service writers pay checks, relevant taxes and health insurance, liability insurance, the purchase and depreciation of the spares inventory, the list goes on and on. The technicians must be paid a going rate for their skills, such as the ability to diagnose both complex mechanical and electronics problems for a wide variety of motorcycle models and types, even just for one brand. If it takes a long time to repair your bike they might even have to pay for the overhead of giving you a lift to somewhere you need to go, or even give you a loaner motorcycle.

So, considering all that, I think it is a wonder anyone makes any money at all running a dealership service department, especially if you live where the bulk of the work is seasonal in nature. I've always been very happy with my mine. No, they are not cheap for sure, but motorcycles these days are complex systems and when they go wrong they are often equally complex to diagnose and fix.

Now your dealership service department where you live might not be good value for money, but the ones I use generally do a very professional and reliable job for which I am willing to pay just a little more money for. And no, I'm definitely not rich and I can't afford to throw money away either. However, I have to remind myself that they are a business and have to return some kind of profit at the end of the day on what is an expensive business to establish and run. However, for me, it is mainly that I just want to be confident that when I leave the dealership, and get out onto the open road, that everything works as it should. I have to remind myself that cheap shoddy workmanship can be very very expensive.
I hope all dealerships read and use your post as a guide. Then I would have nothing to complain about.
 

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I hope all dealerships read and use your post as a guide. Then I would have nothing to complain about.
Yes, I know, in a perfect world eh? We can dream after all.

I do think most well frequented dealerships here do a pretty good job these days, as redoing the work over just ate any profit they would have made doing it properly the first time.

Customer loyalty for repeat business, in what after all is a business based on non essential purchases of a very expensive products, "should" be very important to them. As should be keeping their Triumph franchise.

I think dealers for most import brands in the US do a much better job than they used to, as it is probably the only way to for them stay in business on the margins they operate on.

I have one Triumph dealer near me, all the others are in the nearest neighboring cities about 400-500 odd miles away in any direction. However they are very good and have always treated me fairly.

Depending upon the density of dealers in your country, this of course might not be the case, especially if the importer is not doing their job and maintaining standards properly.

Good luck in your efforts to find a good one. Stay safe from the covid.
 

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Yes, I know, in a perfect world eh? We can dream after all.

I do think most well frequented dealerships here do a pretty good job these days, as redoing the work over just ate any profit they would have made doing it properly the first time.

Customer loyalty for repeat business, in what after all is a business based on non essential purchases of a very expensive products, "should" be very important to them. As should be keeping their Triumph franchise.

I think dealers for most import brands in the US do a much better job than they used to, as it is probably the only way to for them stay in business on the margins they operate on.

I have one Triumph dealer near me, all the others are in the nearest neighboring cities about 400-500 odd miles away in any direction. However they are very good and have always treated me fairly.

Depending upon the density of dealers in your country, this of course might not be the case, especially if the importer is not doing their job and maintaining standards properly.

Good luck in your efforts to find a good one. Stay safe from the covid.
Everything you say is absolutely correct and I can only speak from my own experience. With evey visit for the scheduled service having its own problem from small to big, and this is at $450 for a basic service. I feel at this price there should never be a problem, it should be 100% correct.
Now the bike is out of warranty, I have found a small owner operator bike shop, who I trust and that is the key, trust.
I hope you keep safe too, I look forward to more posts from you on this forum 👍
 

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IMO, you get a lot of bike for the price from Triumph. The Twins are easy to modify to your own riding style. Maintenance cost are not expensive. The twins are exciting to ride. No such think as a perfect machine.
 

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Everything you say is absolutely correct and I can only speak from my own experience. With evey visit for the scheduled service having its own problem from small to big, and this is at $450 for a basic service. I feel at this price there should never be a problem, it should be 100% correct.
Now the bike is out of warranty, I have found a small owner operator bike shop, who I trust and that is the key, trust.
I hope you keep safe too, I look forward to more posts from you on this forum 👍
$450 for a basic service? That is a bit on the high side. Is this in US dollars? What can they possibly get wrong for goodness sake? It should definitely be 100% correct every time. Oil, filter, chain adjustment, check over wear items, good to go. Out the door for US$250-$300 tops. These bikes are fairly low maintenance on the whole. Mine has just been oil, filter and chain adjust every time. If your new mechanic can do a routine service on a modern Harley I'm sure they'll handle your Triumph just fine.
 

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$450 for a basic service? That is a bit on the high side. Is this in US dollars? What can they possibly get wrong for goodness sake? It should definitely be 100% correct every time. Oil, filter, chain adjustment, check over wear items, good to go. Out the door for US$250-$300 tops. These bikes are fairly low maintenance on the whole. Mine has just been oil, filter and chain adjust every time. If your new mechanic can do a routine service on a modern Harley I'm sure they'll handle your Triumph just fine.
$450 Australia, which is a significant slice out of my pay. For some thing nonessential, the motorcycle that is. At every service there was a problem, from the bike being extremely dirty like it had been off road, to as minor as papers missing and haveing to pick paperwork up the next day, parts being overtight.
I can do minor maintenance myself which I enjoy, but to keep the warranty you have to have it serviced professionally. So now oil changes, chain adjustment, filters I'll do myself. Tyres, valve adjustment will be the new mechanics job.
I understand dealerships have overheads, but if I'm paying top dollar, my expectations are top too. The dealership service didn't match the price they were charging in my experience.
I do love the bike though, just to end on a positive 😁
 

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Well said mecsw500. Too true. Business profitability is not easy. Been there, done that. Lost me house. Not nice. I would still like to now how many this gear selector issue affects, & whether it's T120 only. I saw a survey on the Triumph Bonneville site on facebook where only 3 or 4 had the problem, & 96 (I think didn't) I know that's probably not very accurate FWIW, but that's all I've ever seen on numbers. And I don't know where FIllingham got his numbers from. In fact I don't recall seeing any!!
Sorry, I'm stuck in the wrong gear.
 

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Nice video. However, it should have been interesting to see which parts didn't move as they are supposed to when the gear shifter was engaged and everything was opened up and visible. Is it a material fault, assembly fault or design fault? Since this has only happened to a few bikes it seems unlikely to be a design fault. All the water cooled 1200 and 900 engines use the same design and the same selector mechanism and pivot plate.
 
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