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Happened to me on my 16 T120 at around 6000 miles. Transmission stuck in high gear and wouldn't downshift. No injuries to the shift mechanism that I could find. I was out of warranty so ordered all the parts myself and repaired it myself. Total cost with the clutch tool was around $100.00 US. I don't really trust the bike anymore so only ride it locally. There are a few of us who have had this issue with having no damage to the shift mechanism. Others who have had damage. There seems to be no rhyme or reason for this. But the shift mechanism seems to be NON robust. Personally it has put me off of Triumph. It is my first, I don't believe there will be a second in my future.
 

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I'm not put off by Triumph. I've had three bikes and two were great. The T120 had an issue, and while the dealership was horrible, Triumph stepped right up, no questions asked. My dealership went out of their way to screw me and most companies would take the dealerships word, but Triumph stood by the product. For that reason alone I'd buy another bike from Triumph.

Sent from my Pixel 3a using Tapatalk
 

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2019 T120 Diamond
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148 Posts
The tech bulletin Stuart refers to in the video 'seems' to relate to bikes before VIN 739143. I say 'seems' because, as Stuart suggests, there 'seems' to be a typo in the bulletin, otherwise it suggests that the fix is for bikes built after VIN 739143, not earlier, which doesn't 'seem' to make sense. My 2019 T120 Diamond has VIN 964... so the tech bulletin 'seems' to refer to bikes earlier than mid 2018 (???). Like many others I have not experienced any shifting issues other than the normal 'thunks' in almost 3500 kms.
 

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I have never droped my bike and this has happened to me 3 times.The third time I repaired the issue myself. The new updated part cost about 70 pounds sterling.
This is a foto I took of the worn shift mechanism after only 1500 miles since replacing for the second time.
For people like me that this has happened to on more than one occasion for no apparent reason it is a right pain in the butt.
The worst thing for me was the fact that Triumph have completely ignored my requests for an explenation as to why the fault occurs.I have sent three on-line technical issue requests all of which were opened with a case number and then ignored.
Apart from that I adore my bike and would never change it.
 

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At the end of the day it is a machine and as such machines break.
And this attitude is exactly how we can defeat Skynet and free our people from The Matrix!😁
 
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One the other hand there are posts elsewhere on this forum where people have run up well over 100,000 km on their Bonnies with no problems (180k is the highest I can remember) - you pays your money and takes your choice... All I can say is 28k so far and hasn't missed a gear yet :)
 

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2019 Speed Twin
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257 Posts
My speed twin with 5k miles started shifting funny and neutral elusive. Hmm what's wrong. We'll adjusted my clutch cable near the clutch cause lever adjustment at end and everything's ok now. Was worried a little.
Being a former manufacturing guy (retired) I would expect triumph is looking at the repairs they are paying for under warranty and the number of gear selectors being purchased outright. It's easy for them to do. If the repairs hit a level that dictates a problem someone looks at it. For this part it might be bad batch of material, improper heat treating, or poor design. They would fix the part and create a new p/n or new ec (engineering change) level and gut the old parts out of the system when new parts are available en masse. Only thru time can you actually tell if the fix works.
Triumph will not issue a recall cause it will cost them $$$$$$$$. They will fix bikes as required and nothing else.
 

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Exactly, I tried to explain the difference to Stuart fillingham when he was talking about gearbox failures but he either couldn't understand or didn't want to, maybe it just suits his click bait agenda to make people thing their gearbox is going to fail.

Reading this thread is like reading the comments on fillinghams videos, people posting mis- information about expensive gearbox failures and others who don't have the problem panicking because they think their bike is going to explode and kill them.
Like @Faster Pastor says, it's nothing to do with the gearbox, its not expensive (unless you take it to a Triumph dealer who will always rip you off), and its not that common, so just enjoy the ride.
Fillingham's videos are entertaining enough, he's got that great accent, and I've bought a few items after seeing him post about it (love my Ashley Watson jacket) but he's not any kind of mechanic. He just makes his bikes pretty. So I wouldn't expect much from him about how to actually repair anything. Dellboy seems pretty good though. Maybe he could be cajoled into addressing it. I've got a '12 T100 and I am thinking of adding frame sliders to help prevent any shifter damage.
 

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Fillingham's videos are entertaining enough, he's got that great accent, and I've bought a few items after seeing him post about it (love my Ashley Watson jacket) but he's not any kind of mechanic. He just makes his bikes pretty. So I wouldn't expect much from him about how to actually repair anything. Dellboy seems pretty good though. Maybe he could be cajoled into addressing it. I've got a '12 T100 and I am thinking of adding frame sliders to help prevent any shifter damage.
Stuart takes pleasure in dissing Triumph and anyone who offers an argument otherwise. After he said Triumph's quality was smoke and mirrors and Royal Enfield's quality was much better well....that pretty much told me where he was and I own both.
 

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I'm not sure if you're actually serious or not :LOL: :LOL: :LOL: :LOL: :LOL: :poop:
I haven't actually watched that many of his videos yet so don't know how good he is but he seems more a mechanic than Fillingham at least. The only real mechanic I've seen is Chris Harris. That guy knows his way around older Beemers. Speaking of which, going to look at a 92 K75 right now. It's actually what I was looking for when the T100 popped up at a price I couldn't resist. Might have to live with them both for a while and make a decision. Blasphemy, I know.
 

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I haven't actually watched that many of his videos yet so don't know how good he is but he seems more a mechanic than Fillingham at least. The only real mechanic I've seen is Chris Harris. That guy knows his way around older Beemers. Speaking of which, going to look at a 92 K75 right now. It's actually what I was looking for when the T100 popped up at a price I couldn't resist. Might have to live with them both for a while and make a decision. Blasphemy, I know.
I feel in love with a Markesh red K75S in 1987. A real beauty...smooth as glass. I never made a connection with the bike as far as riding. The short friction zone and long turning radius always had me a little nervous at low speed.

The smoothness comes at the price of punch while passing and the quietness off the engine was less than exciting.

I still have a beautifully framed picture of the K75S in my shop but I really don't miss it much. I'm confident you won't be unhappy with it but I'm also pretty sure you won't be inspired.
 

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Exactly, I tried to explain the difference to Stuart fillingham when he was talking about gearbox failures but he either couldn't understand or didn't want to, maybe it just suits his click bait agenda to make people thing their gearbox is going to fail.

Reading this thread is like reading the comments on fillinghams videos, people posting mis- information about expensive gearbox failures and others who don't have the problem panicking because they think their bike is going to explode and kill them.
Like @Faster Pastor says, it's nothing to do with the gearbox, its not expensive (unless you take it to a Triumph dealer who will always rip you off), and its not that common, so just enjoy the ride.
It’s annoying the dealership have to charge so much. The price does not equal the service they provide.
 

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I have a 2017 Street Twin with 13800km. No shifting problems, I enjoy the bike it puts a smile on my face.
Unfortunately if Triumph want to be known as a premium brand, there can never be any doubt in the consumers mind about quality and reliability.
 

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2020 T120
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I have never droped my bike and this has happened to me 3 times.The third time I repaired the issue myself. The new updated part cost about 70 pounds sterling.
This is a foto I took of the worn shift mechanism after only 1500 miles since replacing for the second time.
For people like me that this has happened to on more than one occasion for no apparent reason it is a right pain in the butt.
The worst thing for me was the fact that Triumph have completely ignored my requests for an explenation as to why the fault occurs.I have sent three on-line technical issue requests all of which were opened with a case number and then ignored.
Apart from that I adore my bike and would never change it.
That photo says a lot. Thank for posting it. Looks like a casting that could be more robust or maybe a machined part instead. @moltensilicates Stewart does like to talk during his intoxicating videos. Maybe he's a lot like my wife who can talk but doesn't enjoy listening as much? ;)
 

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I'd also

I'd also like to know if it's only T120's
Forgot to mention, mines a 2018, done 23,400kms, & no issues with gearbox/selectors so far. I've had a few other issues tho, but won't go there as they were all fixed pretty satisfactorily by the local dealer here in Melbourne, Aus
 

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My 2018 T120 has been fine so far, shifts nicely both up and down, much better than any BMW twin I've ever owned. I doubt if anything close to 100% of all T120's fail though, so perhaps I'm just one of the lucky ones. Of course having said that, it means it will be guaranteed to fail tomorrow, hundreds of miles from home, up in the mountains, in a remote area, with no cell coverage.

However, if your bike goes down on the left hand side while moving, you may of course end up causing a shifting problem. I rather suspect there is some chance of causing some kind of transmission related damage as a result on just about any brand of motorcycle. Depending upon how you crash, how the shift lever snags on the road surface or perhaps even strikes a curb, may be a factor as to what damage may occur.
 
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