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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I noticed that my Galphor front brake rotor was pulsing. Thought I needed to replace it. I had a friend suggest to me to re-torque the bolts holding the rotor. In addition I found on another forum a suggestion to clean the buttons that hold the rotor to the carrier.

I did both these and no more pulse. I have ridden the bike for about 1200 miles and it has not returned as of yet.

Any one else have any expierance doing this?
 

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I noticed that my Galphor front brake rotor was pulsing. Thought I needed to replace it. I had a friend suggest to me to re-torque the bolts holding the rotor. In addition I found on another forum a suggestion to clean the buttons that hold the rotor to the carrier.

I did both these and no more pulse. I have ridden the bike for about 1200 miles and it has not returned as of yet.

Any one else have any expierance doing this?
No, but I was just about to go outside and pull the bike apart to put a rotor on the front of the new Bonnie. I guess I will check the bolts first as I can do that with the front axle on.

*crosses fingers*
 

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If you tighten those bolts you'll break the loctite seal on them. I'd remove them (one at a time), clean them, then reinstall with new loctite.
Some of them turned very easily.. my thought at the time was "This isn't a floating rotor!" but cinched down to 22nm ( per shop manual ) doesn't seem to have fixed that. I was wondering if there is somehow dirt and build up behind the rotor, against the hub. I can't find any thick spots, and no dicernable wobble when the bike is jacked up.

So should I:

1 take all the bolts out, take the caliper off and clean the hub / disk and reinstall the current disk

2 take bolt one at a time off, re loctite the bolts and reinstall?

3 take the whole front apart, put the new disk in and re loctite the mounting nuts.
 

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Some of them turned very easily.. my thought at the time was "This isn't a floating rotor!" but cinched down to 22nm ( per shop manual ) doesn't seem to have fixed that. I was wondering if there is somehow dirt and build up behind the rotor, against the hub. I can't find any thick spots, and no dicernable wobble when the bike is jacked up.

So should I:

1 take all the bolts out, take the caliper off and clean the hub / disk and reinstall the current disk

2 take bolt one at a time off, re loctite the bolts and reinstall?

3 take the whole front apart, put the new disk in and re loctite the mounting nuts.

It is rarely a good idea to remove and retorque rotor (or many other) bolts one at a time. Remove them all a turn at a time until they are all loose, then reinstall them all using half torque in a star patern, then full torque in a star pattern. The idea being not to intorduce a warp to the rotor.

Jim :cool:
 

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Sweat has read more Triumph threads than anyone else in the known universe and probably has the right solution.
Since I have anal O.C.D. tendencies I'd probably remove the front wheel (10 minutes) remove the rotor and make sure everything is clean. When re-installing the rotor I would think that the bolts should be tightend in a cross pattern to avoid stress warping. Refer to a shop manual to check on that.
There are no shortcuts when it comes to braking or steering.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I removed the rotor and cleaned the bolts of the old locktite. While I had the rotor off, I cleaned the buttons with brake clean so the the pads would not be effected.
Then reverse procedure , torque to correct spec with blue locktite.
 

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It is rarely a good idea to remove and retorque rotor (or many other) bolts one at a time. Remove them all a turn at a time until they are all loose, then reinstall them all using half torque in a star patern, then full torque in a star pattern. The idea being not to intorduce a warp to the rotor.

Jim :cool:
Sweat has read more Triumph threads than anyone else in the known universe and probably has the right solution.
Since I have anal O.C.D. tendencies I'd probably remove the front wheel (10 minutes) remove the rotor and make sure everything is clean. When re-installing the rotor I would think that the bolts should be tightend in a cross pattern to avoid stress warping. Refer to a shop manual to check on that.
There are no shortcuts when it comes to braking or steering.
you guys are right, it's better to pull the wheel and do it all at once.
 

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I removed the rotor and cleaned the bolts of the old locktite. While I had the rotor off, I cleaned the buttons with brake clean so the the pads would not be effected.
Then reverse procedure , torque to correct spec with blue locktite.

That's the way I would do it!:D

Jim :cool:
 

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This did help a great deal - I just re-torqued them up in a star pattern- finger, 11nm and then 22nm. Much smoother but still a bit warped. I guess I will be putting the new rotor on after all and patting myself on the back (not too much but a bit) for picking up the part already.

Just have to wait for tomorrow, when workshop time comes around again. ( Bike is too hot to go on the jack. )
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Cold I noticed with my rotor it did not improve all at once. It keep getting better while I rode the bike. Perhaps you might ride it a while and then determine if a new rotor is in order.
 

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Cold I noticed with my rotor it did not improve all at once. It keep getting better while I rode the bike. Perhaps you might ride it a while and then determine if a new rotor is in order.
Hummm! Interesting... Of course, this is the bike that has big loud pipes on it... I guess I should just go for an hour or so and see what it seems like. That would be preferable to putting on the other disk if I can help it.
 

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This did help a great deal - I just re-torqued them up in a star pattern- finger, 11nm and then 22nm. Much smoother but still a bit warped. I guess I will be putting the new rotor on after all and patting myself on the back (not too much but a bit) for picking up the part already.

Just have to wait for tomorrow, when workshop time comes around again. ( Bike is too hot to go on the jack. )
If re-torquing the rotor fixes the warp, great, but from reading posts on this site, it seems like a warped rotor is common on this bike. I replaced my badly warped rotor with a floating rotor and couldn't be happier. Bike stops smooth as silk now. If you can spring for $230 or so for the rotor/pad combo, I would recommend it.
 

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If re-torquing the rotor fixes the warp, great, but from reading posts on this site, it seems like a warped rotor is common on this bike. I replaced my badly warped rotor with a floating rotor and couldn't be happier. Bike stops smooth as silk now. If you can spring for $230 or so for the rotor/pad combo, I would recommend it.
I have an EBC on order, in theory it will be at the end of the month, to go on the T100. The good, stock disk will come off the T100 and go on the '05 Bonnie for my brother in law... if I don't put on the other stock disk I have before then as the bike should go home with him very soon. I think it is a little better than before, but I'm planning to swap disks tomorrow, while I have smart people here helping me with pipes and carbs....

Does anyone know what the deal is with the 4.5mm vs 5mm disks is? I can't imagine it makes any difference in the short term, but I'd love to put EBC floaters on both bikes and be done with it.
 
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