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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just spent well over 1k on my bike (bonnie T100, 2005) to get it up an running again, so I'm not shelling out any more in "labor". I should have tried to fix the damned thing myself, but I was nervous about screwing it up.

In any case, I took it away from the shop in running condition, but they warned me that the neutral and oil lights remaining on means that there's "probably" a serious problem with the bike. Can anyone share experiences they've had to verify?

I've read a few threads that lead me to believe that it's not a major issue -- rather, it's just a year-specific problem with the lights.

If someone who knows more than I do can help, I'd be grateful.

Warning -- I know enough to change the oil & plugs, but I want to do/learn more. I didn't grow up around a garage or with folks who would teach me, so I mostly learned anything I know from trial & error on cars rather than bikes.
 

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for starters, you can check this thread:
http://www.triumphrat.net/air-coole...bonneville-oil-neutral-light-wierdness-2.html

SPOILER ALERT: In the last post on the thread, it seems in his case it was caused by a water fouled and broken connector somewhere. He revealed the solution in pictures that are no longer connected to the thread.
This is what caused the neutral and oil light intermittant fault. ...
The dark patch and blobs on the harness sleeve are water and the chalky stuff is copper salts. The connector must have been held together by the plastc around it for some time bfore it broke. I hope this feed back helps someone some day.. I have used some 20mm split plastic auto conduit to replace what I cut off and it looks quite neat and shouldn't trap water this time.
OP was active last month, so maybe you could shoot him a message asking for clarity?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the link -- I already checked out that thread. I just want to make sure the shop was just trying to scare me (into paying more money) by telling me that the bike wasn't safe to ride in it's current state.
 

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In any case, I took it away from the shop in running condition, but they warned me that the neutral and oil lights remaining on means that there's "probably" a serious problem with the bike.
I think those at the shop are staying on the safe side - under normal conditions, if the oil light remains on, of course there is a serious problem, but I guess you know that already. The fact that two lights are remaining on points toward an electrical fault.

Has this happened since you bought the bike away from the shop? If not I would suspect that it has been fixed so its probably a waste of time trying to chase it down now. If it has happened, the shop have clearly not fixed the problem and I for one, would want my money back.

I've read a few threads that lead me to believe that it's not a major issue -- rather, it's just a year-specific problem with the lights.
An electrical problem that doesn't prevent the bike from running is not a major issue and can be tracked down and repaired by yourself cheaply and fairly easily. However caution is advised with the oil light in particular, since there is no way of initially telling whether there is a small electrical fault, or whether the light is coming on legitimately. Perhaps that is what those at the shop meant when they warned you.

Warning -- I know enough to change the oil & plugs, but I want to do/learn more. I didn't grow up around a garage or with folks who would teach me, so I mostly learned anything I know from trial & error on cars rather than bikes.
The place to start with electricals is to get yourself a good digital multimeter (a decent one would cost around $20) and learn to use it. Even an expensive meter would pay for itself over time in labour costs. Then you can do your own testing on advice from here.
 
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The neutral and oil lights have +12v at the light constantly , once ignition on , and the oil and neutral switch, switches the 0v to make / break the circuit,

Therefore a short to the metal work of bike would not blow fuse as it's switching 0v it would just bring the lights
on constantly

+1 or Rippers suggest on digital multimeter, I recently bought a new one nice and compact from eBay for under £10 does everything needed, volts , ohms, continuity, a wiring diagram for your bike would also be very useful, they have been posted on here numerous times, might need to do a search, good look
 

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Here's a diagram of a carbed Bonnie. Can anyone see a path to ground that would make both the neutral and oil pressure idiot lights come on? Through the igniter perhaps? Carb heater switch? Note both bulbs have a connection in common, I think it must be that green/red wire that's going to ground somewhere.

Note there are two links missing from the alarm connector, these are pins 1-2 and 3-5:

 

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As the 'scary' bit is just the oil warning light can't you check that with a multimeter? Admittedly I don't know what I'm talking about, but it seems that if you can disconnect the oil pressure switch you should be able to check if it is working with a simple continuity test. If it is an open circuit with the engine off and then breaks the circuit when you fire it up then all is well with the oil pressure; no? In which case it is just a wiring fault and can be tackled at leisure while the OP continues to use the bike.
 

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Here's a diagram of a carbed Bonnie. Can anyone see a path to ground that would make both the neutral and oil pressure idiot lights come on? Through the igniter perhaps? Carb heater switch? Note both bulbs have a connection in common, I think it must be that green/red wire that's going to ground somewhere.
I can't see a path to ground on the diagram. If the Green/Red wire went to ground it would blow fuse#5 since this is the wire that feeds the starter button and powers the igniter, and comes from the ignition switch via the alarm connector at pin#1, so the bike would not run. The oil light ground (signal) wire does not go to the igniter so it can't be that. Same kind of thing for the carb heater switch.

The only thing I can think of is the idiot light connector block having moisture in it, or perhaps those crimped joints inside the harness. The OP has not given enough detail for a diagnosis, such as any older electrical work that has been done in that area or any mods done. He needs to set to work with a meter, firstly on the oil light signal wire IMO.
 

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This may not be a single problem that the op has it may very well be two individual problems

I agree with Ripper and Patrick, you need to start with pulling the connector for the oil switch and prove that at least you have oil pressure
 

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OP, do you by any chance have LEDs in the lights that are staying on?
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Wow, thanks for all these replies. It's a holiday here in the US, so I've been busy hosting various bbq parties. I haven't had a chance to do much on the bike. So, I have a multimeter, but idk where/how to check the oil indicator independent of the idiot lights.

The neutral light went off for a split second, but it came back on and stayed on.

Once I know where to put the leads for the multimeter, I'll check the electrical and report back. Thank is for the help!
 

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Once I know where to put the leads for the multimeter, I'll check the electrical and report back.
Starting with the oil light switch - this is situated on the back of the cylinders. It is covered by a rubber boot and there is a black wire running to it.

Pull the boot back and detach the wire from the switch. Leave it detached but not touching anything. Tuck it somewhere out of the way if you can for now.

Switch the meter to its diode test or 'beep' mode. The meter should beep if you touch the probes together. The setting may be marked by a little diode symbol.

Leave the ignition OFF. Put the red probe on the switch, where the wire plugged on. Now put the black probe on any one of the engine case screws or any handy bolt head on the engine. The meter should beep.

Put the meter to one side and switch the ignition ON. Does the oil light come on? It should not, since its wire is disconnected. We will come back to this in a moment.

Start the engine. With the engine running, put the meter back across the switch as before. This time you should not be able to get the meter to beep. If these are the results you get, the switch is okay. Switch the bike OFF.

Now, if the oil light came on when you switched on the ignition, that points to the wire to the oil light switch shorting to ground somewhere. Check this by putting the red probe on the wire and the black probe on an engine bolt head (do not do this with the ignition on!). The meter should not beep but if it does, that confirms the suspicion of a short to ground.

Carry out these checks and report back to us.
 

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I think your main concern should be whether or not the engine actually has proper oil pressure. Not the electrical system for the switch. That comes later. You don't check for engine oil pressure with a DVOM. That doesn't mean anything. If you want to check for a grounded oil sender wire just disconnect from the sender. If the light is still coming on then it is being grounded. Use the oil light as your test equipment. That's it's job anyway. Or it wouldn't cost much to then just replace the sender. But getting a good DVOM is still a good idea. I have 4 Flukes but you don't need to spend that much money.
But to check engine oil pressure you have to plumb in a pressure gauge. Remove the oil sender and connect there. I don't know the turn- on pressure for the oil sender. Cars are usually around 7 psi. Chevrolet says that's enough. I don't know if an oil pressure test kit can be rented or not. But there should be one available with the proper threads. I suspect they are pipe threads. I've never removed my oil sender. My oil light hasn't worked for 30,000 miles. IDC. I just listen for loud engine noises. Heard none in 51,000 miles.


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I think your main concern should be whether or not the engine actually has proper oil pressure. Not the electrical system for the switch. That comes later. You don't check for engine oil pressure with a DVOM. That doesn't mean anything.
I'm not checking for oil pressure. This is an electrical problem.

If you want to check for a grounded oil sender wire just disconnect from the sender. If the light is still coming on then it is being grounded.
That is exactly one of the things I have told him to do, but I also want to check the switch to confirm that it is working.

There are two lights staying on, not just the oil light. That's just the starting point. The OP's report will tell where to go from here. They may be separate problems, and bear in mind that he is also learning how to use a multimeter.
 
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