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Have you fellow Bonnie owners read the details that was in motor cycle news about a problem with the spokes on our wheels that can cause punctures, although not a problem that Triumph have admitted they have asked dealers to check all spokes on bikes that come in for services in future :???:
 

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As has been said, just check them fairly regularly the way you should do with all spoked wheels. If you want to avoid a puncture, you can reduce the risk by using wire or cable ties around the spokes where they cross over. This stops the broken spoke from flapping around until it hits something that drives it away from the wheel hub and into the tyre.

If you've seen The Long Way Round, this is why BMW had Ewan and Charley doing just that on their bikes when they visited BMW for a familiarisation exercise in episode two (IIRC).

Don't trust MCN as a source of bonafide information. They took one bloke who'd had a puncture because of a broken spoke, talked to one wheel builder and - hey presto - that's good enough grounds for them on which to base a scare story.

Me? I tap mine with a screwdriver or a teaspoon every time I wash the bike (i.e. most weekends). :hammer:
 

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On 2006-11-17 08:53, Thunder_Forever wrote:
Any spoke on any bike is capable of doing this if neglected......always check them...common sense.
Good advice. There seems to be a new thread on spokes every week. Spokes need maintenance. Triumph doesn't have any problem to "admit" other than the normal care for spoke wheels. Their scheduled maintenance check sheet has always had a line for "Wheels - check for broken or damaged spokes and check spoke tightness" during every service.
 

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Broken spokes and flats, go hand in hand. In years past.....'60's and '70's, most off-road racers safety wired spokes together, where they crossed. This kept broken spokes from "whipping" around, and possibly puncturing a tube.

If spoke breakage looks to be a problem, I personally will revive the procedure. It won't stop the spokes from breaking, but it might at least let me find it in the comfort of my garage, instead of the middle of nowhere, at dark thirty

EDIT.....LOL....looks like me and Steviek was thinking along the same lines....I just type slow....LMREO!

[ This message was edited by: kliff on 2006-11-17 09:52 ]
 

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You lot are missing the point.
Some of these broken spokes have been on very low milage and nearly new bikes.

I can't dissagree with the fact that ever since the wheel was invented there have been broken spokes. Also I agree that spkes should be on your list of safety checks.

BUT we are talking here of bikes that are almost new.

This issue of broken spokes as been discussed at length on the delphi forums as well as on here.
848 posts in THIS thread alone.

read all about broken spokes by clicking here
 

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One thing to realize, is that a new wheel is more likely to do this than one that has settled in. After a wheel settles, they can frequently go a good long time, as long as you dont hit major pot-holes and such.
When they are new, like the first 1000 miles, is when you should be careful
G :hammer:
 

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On 2006-11-17 10:33, Geoff wrote:
One thing to realize, is that a new wheel is more likely to do this than one that has settled in. After a wheel settles, they can frequently go a good long time, as long as you dont hit major pot-holes and such.
When they are new, like the first 1000 miles, is when you should be careful
G :hammer:
Well if that's the case not only have we got the original manufacture & factory assembly inspection but there is then the dealer Pre Delivery Inspection then the 500 miles first service and after all these checks there are still broken spokes!!!!
 

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I'm going to go out on a bit of a limb and say, people who know spoked wheels and check their spoke tension on a regular basis, have not had this problem. people who are new to spokes and maybe even bikes in general, who dont think about checking them because after all, they are new, are the ones with problems. maybe not every case, but the great majority. it may be that dealer mechanics dont check wheels well enough, and since people dont check on their own, a problem arises. I do my own safety checks and have found no problem.
G
 

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Geoff,

I've followed this issue on the New Triumph Bonneville Forum and must say that you're way out on that limb! Check out their ongoing thread as advised here by English Spanner.
JR
 

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You may be right as I have not checked the other forum out.
I will do so
G
 

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I went 22,000 miles on my '05 BonnieBlack with no problems. I rode over goat trails, I rode hard, and I rode fast. That having been said, I'm convinced that there are in fact documented problems..... and Triumph tech's have since been trained to say that checking the spokes is (now) a part of their (scheduled) service. But it appears Triumph is reluctant to step up to the plate and openly discuss it with the public.

I have since learned that it might be good practice to take your wheels to somebody who KNOWS spoke wheels and have him inspect, service, and/or adjust accordingly. I would suggest putting a couple thousand miles on your brand new wheels before having them inspected/dialed-in.

Frankly I think the quality of the wheels and certainly the spokes is NOT especially top notch. And if you follow where the wheels are made, where then the spokes are made, and where eventually they're both shipped to be assembled and sent to the factory..... well, the whole process is not confidence inspiring.

It may cost a little bit-o-dough, but if you're so inclined...... having your factory spokes replaced with some Buchanan stainless steel spokes might be worth considering. I REPLACED my factory wheels with Excel alloys AND Buchanan spokes.

[ This message was edited by: FattRat on 2006-11-17 14:46 ]
 

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On 2006-11-17 13:53, joerockhead wrote:
Geoff,

I've followed this issue on the New Triumph Bonneville Forum and must say that you're way out on that limb! Check out their ongoing thread as advised here by English Spanner.
JR
There's 848 posts on that thread. I didn't read all of them, but it sure looks like Geoff isn't that far out on a limb. Can you point out posts where people can document that they had the spokes checked at initial delivery, had them checked at 500 miles, and checked again at least every 6000 miles and still had them break?

My dealer re-torqued the spokes at the 500 mile check-up. Like many other old-timers, I check my spokes every time I clean and lube the chain. I have found one or two loose spokes and tightened them back up. After 12000 miles, I have had no problems.
 

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I'm looking at buying a Bonneville and have been doing a lot of web-based research on them. There does indeed appear to be a problem, specifically breakage of the outside spokes on the left side of the rear wheel. The fact that the majority of the spoke breakages are so specifically located speaks volumes.

I spoke with Chris at Wheel Works in Hayward, CA. Chris has been building wheels for decades. His opinion is that the rear hub is a particularly bad design. It works well enough if the spokes are kept tight, but let them stretch and the spoke heads start getting hammered. After so many cycles you get embrittlement and breakage, and the only real cure is to replace all of the spokes. A number of people report good results with regular, carbon steel spokes. They aren't as pretty as stainless but are far less prone to work hardening and the resultant loss of integrity.

This doesn't mean I won't be buying a Triumph, just that I'll be keeping an eye on spoke tension. And maybe finding an excuse to lace up a set of aluminum rims if the opportunity is forced on me ("Yeah, honey, I gotta buy some new rims and spokes, it's a safety issue, dontchaknow").
 

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Ok, now for a dumb question having never having spoke wheels except on my old spyder bike when I was a kid.


Is it possible to overtighten the a loose spoke and screw up the alignment of the wheel?
Thought I remember a post from awhile back concerning this.

Randy
 

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OK, with all the spoke-talk, I'd like to know how to check them. I read baove about tapping them for the same "tone." Is this legit? Is there a way I can check them in my driveway, wheel on the bike with a flashlight and one eye closed (i.e. a really easy way)?
 

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it is possible to overtighten a spoke, and pull a wheel out of spec.
the simple way is to get the wheel off the ground, start at the stem (so you know where you started) and turn the wheel and tap each spoke with a spoon, or screwdriver, to get a ringing tone from the spoke. they should all be similiar in tone, they do not have to be piano tune perfect. if you hit a loose one, it'll thud instead of ring, so you tighten it using the nipple at the wheel and a spoke wrench. if you have many loose ones, or a wobble, take it to a wheel man to be trued up. doing this on all my bikes (except a yammy with alloys) has kept me from any spoke related problems, so far.
G
 

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On 2006-11-17 17:57, RT wrote:
Is it possible to overtighten the a loose spoke and screw up the alignment of the wheel?
Yes.

Proper spoke tension is needed to keep the rim in true. There should be less than 1 mm of play (both side-to-side and up-and-down) in a properly trued wheel (assuming the rim itself is well-made).

I won't get into a long, technical description of wheel truing, let it suffice that there's a bit of an art to it but it isn't beyond what a decent backyard mechanic can do. Im certain you can find on-line articles that will show you how to properly tension your spokes.

By the way, the popular myth of "tighten them all up until they all make the same note when you strike them" is just that- a myth.

EDIT: Simultaneously posted with Geoff's reply. Not contradicting what he's saying- they should all ring, but they won't necessarily all make the same tone when the wheel is straight.

[ This message was edited by: bmetz99 on 2006-11-17 19:10 ]
 
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