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I am sorry for such a question. Recently I got my first bike and now I am deep into this hobby. I want to ask where do you stay your bike if you do not drive it. I have neither a garage nor a backyard to store that. I stay it near the entrance door. A year ago we were thinking about installing a security system for our house. Now, this idea is quite actual. Maybe anyone knows any reliable companies, Ajax or others, that will be able to install all the essential sensors and alarms, also cameras. So, I want to check everything through my phone.
 

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A year ago we were thinking about installing a security system for our house.
That is well worth doing, if you can get a camera to cover the area that the bike is stored in. Another good idea (if possible) is to install one of those camera door bells (Ring), which will send an alert to your phone.

There are basically two types of bike thief:

Professional - these guys steal bikes to order, more commonly exotic and sports models/brands. They will usually target places like bike showrooms and are the ones with vans. Very little will protect the bike from these people, they carry stuff like portable oxy cutters so ground anchors are not much use. A couple of years ago my son in law's Ducati dealership got done over by professionals, they destroyed the front of the showroom with the van and took 4 brand new V4 models which were chained together. They were in and out within 22 seconds. The bikes are already sold (usually abroad) before they are stolen.

Opportunist - the guy that you can beat. Apart from ground anchors or disk locks, the key with these guys is to delay them by doing simple things like using a bike cover, using keyless ignition (no ignition lock to go for), a separate immobilizer or locking both wheels. If the bike is going to take him more than 5 minutes to steal, he will usually move on to an easier target. The more barriers you can put in his way, the better.

Whatever else you do, I would suggest fitting a tracker. This is far better than an alarm - it won't prevent your bike from being stolen, but it will alert you via your phone and show you where the bike is. Trackers have become much cheaper recently, and you can now get them that use Google Maps. At least a tracker will give you a chance to recover your bike.
 
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Here are a few "Off the Wall " suggestions for you. Some will only slow a determined thief.
1. Own a bike that nobody will want to steal. My old Harley 883 Sportster might be a good example of this.
2. Padlocks through the holes in the rear sprocket.
3. Chains, secured with padlocks, one through the front wheel and the frame, the other in back.
4. Build a small shed. Lock the door and install an alarm that will sound if the door is opened. Like a locked auto trunk, not knowing what is inside can discourage a thief.
5. Get a second, non-functional bike. Lock the two together with chains to slow those who would pick up the bike and load it on a small truck or a trailer.
6. Wireless bicycle alarm from Ebay for around $10. Bicycle people might have more ideas for you.
7. Trail camera (with invisible infrared light) might help to ID a thief.
 

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A steel cage is probably the most secure passive security, with a remotely controlled magnetic lock. In the UK, bikes are stolen in broad daylight in full view of passers-by; also bikers on coveted bikes followed to their home addresses. The police are next to useless.

If you have the space, then a blocking vehicle can be useful, but leave it in gear as well as handbrake on.

Neither of the above work for the OP if he is keeping the bike on the street. Can the bike be kept in the house?

 

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When I lived in AZ where everything gets stolen constantly I used disc rotor locks for my bikes I road the work daily. At the house in the garage I used a cable & lock through all the bikes and the disc locks.
 

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Unfortunately, determined thieves are hard to stop. I've seen security footage where a big bike like a Harley parked in the street was stolen when a van pulled up alongside, four big guys got out and lifted the bike into the van. It was gone in ten seconds. Even bicycles get strange videos appearing, like the one I saw where the bike was chained to a tree. Somebody used a small rechareable chainsaw to cut the tree off at waist level, lifted the chain off the tree, and rode it away.

Having a cover over the bike is simple and can prevent casual opportunists from taking advantage.

The tracker is a good idea, and if you go on to Youtube you will find videos of companies who supply them and find stolen bikes very quickly. You need to buy the unit for the bike and also a subscription to the recovery service. They sometimes work in partnership with local police when recovering bikes. Some of their recoveries are damaged by the thieves who try to bypass the ignition lock. And sometimes an insurance company notes a stolen and recovered bike on the policy and the resale value drops on the assumption the thieves did damage.

The ground anchor is another good idea but take note of the post about thieves using portable cutting gear. Rechargeable angle grinders are a favourite for bike thieves. You will need a very substantial chain and lock. A cycling friend of mine bought a new ebike (several thousand dollars) and it was stolen in minutes when he chained it to a bike lock frame at a shop. The chain was cut and left on the ground. It was so quick that it was obvious the thieves were watching the racks.

Visibility of how the bike is locked can stall off somebody who doesn't want to spend time getting the bike. Something like a chain so substantial that you have to leave it at home, and passed between the spokes of both wheels, might be enough to daunt the enthusiasm of a thief.

Locks are deceptive and not many of them give good protection. Look on youtube for a channel called The Lock Picking Lawyer. This guy shows how easy it is to get into locks in seconds. Even a well designed lock can be blasted open with a Ramset nail gun.

Brake disc locks generally have cast alloy bodies, which is another weak point. When you direct a blast of gas from a cylinder of bbq gas at the body it will chill down to freezing and can become brittle. Then it only takes a hit between two hammers and it shatters. Instead of a bike disc lock, get an industrial lock with a stainless steel body that runs up beside the loop so there's more protection. This kind of thing:
741001
 
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