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Discussion Starter #1
Do you -

1. Hold in, and keep holding, the clutch lever (while in 1st gear)

or

2. Shift to neutral, thus relieving the constant left-hand squeeze?
 

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both

i do bit of both. but i believe MSF course tell you to be in gear just in case you need to move out of the way of harm.
 

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It all depends on your stoplight...

I tend to know the habits of most of the stop lights in my town and some will keep me waiting for a few days before changing whilst some change every 30 seconds.

Depending on which light I'm stopped at determines whether I leave her in gear or not.
 

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I put the bike in neutral unless I expect it to be a short stop. Back in the late 70s I attended a training course (in the UK) run by the RAC/ACU (it's now defunct) and they made us put our left hands in the air at stop lights to show the instructor we had gone in to neutral. I understand the MSF courses in the US teach the opposite! Personally, when at a stop light I tend to be looking at the lights rather than in my rear view mirror waiting to be rear ended and I wonder how many people actually manage to avoid being hit by using this method. I would think it more likely that your hand would slip off the clutch and lose control of the bike if hit lightly. I wouldn't say it never happens here, but being rear-ended when stationary seems to be a bigger issue in the US than here. In the UK the main issue I confront is people pulling out in to my path.
 

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I put the bike in neutral unless I expect it to be a short stop. Back in the late 70s I attended a training course (in the UK) run by the RAC/ACU (it's now defunct) and they made us put our left hands in the air at stop lights to show the instructor we had gone in to neutral. I understand the MSF courses in the US teach the opposite! Personally, when at a stop light I tend to be looking at the lights rather than in my rear view mirror waiting to be rear ended and I wonder how many people actually manage to avoid being hit by using this method. I would think it more likely that your hand would slip off the clutch and lose control of the bike if hit lightly. I wouldn't say it never happens here, but being rear-ended when stationary seems to be a bigger issue in the US than here. In the UK the main issue I confront is people pulling out in to my path.
Good post Paul.

Plasma.
 

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In gear and watching the mirrors unless I know it to be an exceptionally long light, then neutral. Of course I live in a relatively small town and don't stop at many lights. If I were in constant traffic and lights I'd probably be in neutral more or I'd get a scooter.
 

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As soon as you find neutral,the light will change.
Ha. +1. One good thing about NYC is that a good number of the pedestrian crosswalk signals have the numerical countdowns on them when they start flashing orange. Most start at 25 or 30 seconds. It's a perfect way to time when I need to get back into gear. That's what I pay more attention to than anything else at red lights - the crosswalk signal.
 

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I'm with Malcolm and JasonRP. If I am the first on at the intersection with cars swifly approaching, I tap my brake a few times before leaving the brake applied ( all while stationary ) to let the squibs behind me know that I am stopped. Once traffic is stopped behind me and I know the light is going to be a bit, I'll pop her in neutral.
 

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I usually sit in gear, my old xs650 gave me arms like popeye from the extremely strong clutch springs they put in those things.
Cliff
 

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Be ready to book on out

I'm also one who stays in gear. Even with a stopped car behind you there's a chance you will need to take evasive action if a crash causes cross-traffic to veer towards you.

As for clutch wear - I'm still on my original clutch after 43,000+ miles. I also slip the clutch occasionally to get revs up rather than downshifting. It's not like a car.
 

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Neutral. Always. This avoids wear to the clutch throw out bearing.
 

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What a great thread; I've not thought about being able to take evasive action while stopped at a light. I usually go to neutral unless I know the light is a short one. I do this because I know there is constant wear on the release bearing. Of course, there is wear on the shifter dogs every time I clunk it into first gear, too, so I suppose it's a toss-up.
 

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I just run the light. It avoids difficult decisions like clutch-in or clutch-out.
 

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What a great thread; I've not thought about being able to take evasive action while stopped at a light. I usually go to neutral unless I know the light is a short one. I do this because I know there is constant wear on the release bearing. Of course, there is wear on the shifter dogs every time I clunk it into first gear, too, so I suppose it's a toss-up.
Yeah but clunking it into first gear and revving up just before the light changes just FEELS so good. :D
 
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