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Oi!

Started a conversation once with a bloke who had a W650, sorta wish I hadn't, it was like talking to a Land Rover fanatic.
Wonder if they are all like that?
I used to have a W650. Loved the bike. Low maintenance. Felt good.
Loved the kickstarter.

Downs. Underpowered (44.7hp). Heavy. Blue pipes. Zero support from Kawasaki. I had to order aftermarket parts from Germany. Past 70mph, death wobble.

It was a gateway bike to Triumph.
 

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Does anybody else think it looks a little like a 99 Falcon, from the rear?:skeptical
 

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If you're lucky it's Japanese.
I haven't been around in a few weeks, so I know this is going back a little--like into the land of guitars again--sorry.

Not to argue Roxy, but if you're really lucky your old Epi will be one of the Korean made Samicks--the best non-American Epis ever made. If they're upgraded with American pickups and wiring and have a good set-up they're indistinguishable from a Gibson. Seriously.

Have a Merry Christmas everyone!

Eddie.
 

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I bought a Japanese Epiphone 12 string acoustic in Townsville in the 70s. I threw it in the back of my ute & drove up to Cairns (350 klms) on a blistering hot day. When I pulled the Epi out of it's case in Cairns the face board had collapsed around the sound hole, underneath the neck. That's when I learned why it's essential to tune down guitars (especially 12 strings) when travelling in heat & humidity. I don't think I even played one song on it.:(
 

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I bought a Japanese Epiphone 12 string acoustic in Townsville in the 70s. I threw it in the back of my ute & drove up to Cairns (350 klms) on a blistering hot day. When I pulled the Epi out of it's case in Cairns the face board had collapsed around the sound hole, underneath the neck. That's when I learned why it's essential to tune down guitars (especially 12 strings) when travelling in heat & humidity. I don't think I even played one song on it.:(
THAT was definitely a real drag! Probably no guitar would have survived that.

Merry Christmas to ya' Scratcher.
 

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Oh I dunno. I've had a few guitars bend their necks from heat & humidity. But I've never had one collapse it's faceboard. The Luthiers I showed it to were stunned that it had happened, & laughed at me when I asked if it was fixable. A bent neck is easily straightened, especially if there's a trussrod fitted.
& Merry Xmas to you too Mr Mack
PS Back in the 70s, Maton Guitars, which are built in Melbourne, had a problem with their guitars falling apart in the tropics (literally) due to the glue they were using. It was hippies living in remote jungle communes that alerted them to the problem, & they even flew some researchers into Cedar Bay by chopper, to see what kind of punishment their axes were being subjected to. The result was a new tropical strength glue, which has made Maton Guitars as durable as they are beautiful, since it was introduced in the late 70s. Making them one of the finest things this country manufactures. So if you love your Maton guitar, remember the debt you owe to all those feral hippies.:D
 

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Cedar Bay was a hippie commune on the Nth Qld coast, about 50 miles sth of Cooktown, & 120 miles nth of Cairns. The nearest dirt track a 4X4 can travel on is 10 miles away. & the walk in consists of a steep climb & descent over a jungle clad mountain, & then a 5 mile hike around coastal rocks. Around 73 I walked in there with a back pack full of supplies & a 1950s Hohner semi acoustic guitar (with a Bigsby tail piece), which was my P&J. Unfortunately I'd timed the tides wrong & needed to stay on the higher, more difficult route around the rocks. & of course I slipped on a wet rock & watched in horror as my Hohner's case slid over a boulder & out of view. I scrambled to the edge of the rock & peered down to a ledge about 15' below me, with the guitar lying undamaged on it. It's ok, I reassured myself, looking frantically for a way down to the ledge. Suddenly a monstrous wave engulfed the ledge, & smashed my Hohner to matchsticks. The last I saw of it the Bigsby tail piece & a tangle of strings were sinking slowly to the bottom of the ocean.
The 70s wasn't a good time for me & guitars.:rolleyes:
 

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Had a close look at a W800 today and must admit I was less than impressed with the finish, very industrial looking.
How anyone could make a comparison between these and a Bonneville is beyond me, the finish on the bonnie is streets ahead.
Didn't test ride it so cant comment on that aspect of the bike.:)
Given the choice?

A new triumph Bonneville is my 100% choice.

Both bikes are retro bikes and to be fair the Kawasaki looks nice. But I'd rather have the Triumph. 100% reliable and at the end of the day the Triumph is a TRIUMPH!!!!!!:):):)

I ride a Suzuki as my every day bike but it is a utilitarian bike; I like it I respect it, but it doesn't engage any real emotion in me...the Bonneville is evocative and speaks of something in my emotions!

Triumph Bonneville always and only!

Casper
 

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Great story OS. Scary place for guitars, which can't even be bit by spiders or snakes. Does Australia have to develop the toughest version of everything used there?
 

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Great story OS. Scary place for guitars, which can't even be bit by spiders or snakes. Does Australia have to develop the toughest version of everything used there?
It does up this way. The army has a facility down the road where they see how long it takes things to rot in the tropics. So we're officially the rot capitol of Oz.
 

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See Scratch, that's why I didn't get you a guitar for Christmas. You're much too hard on them! Maybe you should switch to drums, something that can take a bit of a beating. ".-)~
 
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