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I have a 2013 T100, and I think the battery is too weak to provide enough voltage to turn the bike over.

I am getting a voltage reading of 12.58, and I just get a click when I hit the starter. I have had the battery on a tender for 3 days and it says it's a full charge. The battery is 2 or 3 years old.

I imagine that some batteries are better than others, which one would you guys recommend?

Many thanks.
 

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Measure the voltage while you are trying to start the bike. It should stay above 10 to 11 volts. If it goes down to 8 then your battery could be bad.
Mike
 

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I have a 2013 T100, and I think the battery is too weak to provide enough voltage to turn the bike over.

I am getting a voltage reading of 12.58, and I just get a click when I hit the starter. I have had the battery on a tender for 3 days and it says it's a full charge. The battery is 2 or 3 years old.
While not the same model we do share a lot of bits. From my experience with my America the ECU wants to detect at least 12.6VDC before allowing the starter to engage. I never saw 12.5 VDC displayed on my VOM when troubleshooting but I can say that at 12.4VDC my starter will not engage. I can get the click, thinking it may be the headlight cut relay but the starter would not engage. I later upgraded the charging system when replacing the battery with a generic Power Sonic equivalent battery from the local Battery Source. A number of good enough batteries out there but do make sure your motorcycle charging system is working as expected.
 

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I have a 2013 T100, and I think the battery is too weak to provide enough voltage to turn the bike over.

I am getting a voltage reading of 12.58, and I just get a click when I hit the starter. I have had the battery on a tender for 3 days and it says it's a full charge. The battery is 2 or 3 years old.

I imagine that some batteries are better than others, which one would you guys recommend?

Many thanks.
If you question the performance of your battery HAVE IT LOAD TESTED.
Most auto parts stores will do it for free.
Regardless of the vehicle the battery has to pass a load test to be functional.
If the battery passes the load test then look to the charging system.
 

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The Bonnie charging system isn't really up to the job, or it needs a bigger battery. Which you can't fit. I was in the local Triumph w/shop the other day, talking about it. "Oh, you've got to keep a trickle charger on it." Which really isn't very clever, but I've learned to live with it, over 10 years.. (Bikes used daily)
 

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You are likely in a similar situation as me with my '12 Bonnie SE. While my original battery showed a good voltage while resting, it has only 87 CCA of the rated 180 CCA available. I was able to get the bike to start with a portable battery jump, which I believe narrowed things down to a weak battery. I have already purchased another Yuasa YTX12-BS and will commission/install it in the spring when the Bonnie comes out of storage. Hopefully, nothing else is the matter, but this forum has considerable posted info on it already to troubleshoot, if needed.
 

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There's always the dodge, which was given a couple of years ago..take the side cover off and short the terminals on the starter solenoid. I've had to do that a couple of times. (The "brain" in the elektrikals says there's not enough juice. The brain lies!) I love twirling spanners. I hate wiry stuff.
 

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The Bonnie charging system isn't really up to the job, or it needs a bigger battery. Which you can't fit. I was in the local Triumph w/shop the other day, talking about it. "Oh, you've got to keep a trickle charger on it." Which really isn't very clever, but I've learned to live with it, over 10 years.. (Bikes used daily)
My dealer advised me the same with brand new Thruxton. They even install charging port on all new bikes they sell. I am surprised I have to trickle charge the bike I ride almost daily.


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The Bonnie charging system isn't really up to the job, or it needs a bigger battery. Which you can't fit. I was in the local Triumph w/shop the other day, talking about it. "Oh, you've got to keep a trickle charger on it." Which really isn't very clever, but I've learned to live with it, over 10 years.. (Bikes used daily)
If your headlight remains on while pressing start button, it draws too much juice and causes CPU to stop the starting process with a click. I installed a toggle switch on the headlight assembly of my 2009 America so I could shut off headlight while starting. No problems since doing that and my bike starts in freezing cold weather. My bike is kept in an unheated garage and there is no electric for a battery tender. Basically there is a design flaw in some of the models and years. If your headlight goes off when pressing start button, then it's anybody's guess what your problem is. Even if a battery is good, it might be weak. I put a Banshee brand battery in my bike that I got online from bigtimebattery.com for $33.88 free shipping. It has a 4 year warranty and is rated at 230 CCA instead of the usual 180 which most battery brands including Yuasa provide. It's the same size as the original battery and fits perfect.
 

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If your headlight remains on while pressing start button, it draws too much juice and causes CPU to stop the starting process with a click. I installed a toggle switch on the headlight assembly of my 2009 America so I could shut off headlight while starting. No problems since doing that and my bike starts in freezing cold weather. My bike is kept in an unheated garage and there is no electric for a battery tender. Basically there is a design flaw in some of the models and years. If your headlight goes off when pressing start button, then it's anybody's guess what your problem is. Even if a battery is good, it might be weak. I put a Banshee brand battery in my bike that I got online from bigtimebattery.com for $33.88 free shipping. It has a 4 year warranty and is rated at 230 CCA instead of the usual 180 which most battery brands including Yuasa provide. It's the same size as the original battery and fits perfect.
I too park my bike in an unheated garage, winter temps will fall below freezing for a good share of the season, never had my bike on a tender, its a 2014 with the original battery in it and I know that I can go out to the garage right now and start the bike up, its never not started. eventually the battery will fail and then I'll replace it with a the same brand battery, if 6 years isn't a good enough endorsement then I dont know what is.
I've thought about the cutoff switch for the headlight but as yet I haven't needed it so.........
 

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I too park my bike in an unheated garage, winter temps will fall below freezing for a good share of the season, never had my bike on a tender, its a 2014 with the original battery in it and I know that I can go out to the garage right now and start the bike up, its never not started. eventually the battery will fail and then I'll replace it with a the same brand battery, if 6 years isn't a good enough endorsement then I dont know what is.
I've thought about the cutoff switch for the headlight but as yet I haven't needed it so.........
This problem is in SOME of the models and years. Perhaps by 2014 Triumph had solved the problem and that's why your bike starts all the time. It's one thing when a bike won't start while you are at home, but a real bummer when it's night-time and you're in a parking lot out of town.
 

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I have a 2013 T100, and I think the battery is too weak to provide enough voltage to turn the bike over.

I am getting a voltage reading of 12.58, and I just get a click when I hit the starter. I have had the battery on a tender for 3 days and it says it's a full charge. The battery is 2 or 3 years old.

I imagine that some batteries are better than others, which one would you guys recommend?

Many thanks.
There is a big clue in the post that said: "..take the side cover off and short the terminals on the starter solenoid." If that starts the bike, the battery, and charging system are OK. The problem is a poor connection in the heavyweight wiring of the starter circuit, including the solenoid contacts, and the battery's earth ( ground or negative, if you prefer) connection.

A contact resistance of only 0.2 Ohms will limit the starting current to 60 Amps, and that is not enough cranking current to start the bike. Unfortunately this low resistance cannot be measured with a conventional multimeter's Ohms range, but a voltmeter across each connection when pressing the start button should show only a fraction of a volt. A bare hand on each connection immediately after trying to start the enginse should not detect any warmth. If it is hot, it is consuming power, and it shouldn't. Clean the contact faces, and tighten the connection. A rough and ready test, but it often shows the problem up.

Use the voltmeter (multimeter in DC Volts mode) directly on the battery, and if it drops below 11 volts when cranking, the battery is not man enough (sorry, Ladies) for the job. At 11 volts, the electronic ignition on a modern bike will not work. You know how I know that! And if the bike has a carburettor, at 11 volts it will not be turning over fast enough to pull the correct air/fuel mixture into the engine for it to start, anyway. That's why I have to kick my Meriden Triumphs over so hard to start them.

With electricity, "Cleanliness is next to Godliness."

Cold is the enemy of easy starting, as the battery will not achieve maximum current, and engine oil turns into glue. A sub-zero bike needs all the help you can give it.

But, if it is still reluctant to restart after running for a couple of minutes, there is something wrong, and it needs fixing.
 

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There is a big clue in the post that said: "..take the side cover off and short the terminals on the starter solenoid." If that starts the bike, the battery, and charging system are OK. The problem is a poor connection in the heavyweight wiring of the starter circuit, including the solenoid contacts, and the battery's earth ( ground or negative, if you prefer) connection.

A contact resistance of only 0.2 Ohms will limit the starting current to 60 Amps, and that is not enough cranking current to start the bike. Unfortunately this low resistance cannot be measured with a conventional multimeter's Ohms range, but a voltmeter across each connection when pressing the start button should show only a fraction of a volt. A bare hand on each connection immediately after trying to start the enginse should not detect any warmth. If it is hot, it is consuming power, and it shouldn't. Clean the contact faces, and tighten the connection. A rough and ready test, but it often shows the problem up.

Use the voltmeter (multimeter in DC Volts mode) directly on the battery, and if it drops below 11 volts when cranking, the battery is not man enough (sorry, Ladies) for the job. At 11 volts, the electronic ignition on a modern bike will not work. You know how I know that! And if the bike has a carburettor, at 11 volts it will not be turning over fast enough to pull the correct air/fuel mixture into the engine for it to start, anyway. That's why I have to kick my Meriden Triumphs over so hard to start them.

With electricity, "Cleanliness is next to Godliness."

Cold is the enemy of easy starting, as the battery will not achieve maximum current, and engine oil turns into glue. A sub-zero bike needs all the help you can give it.

But, if it is still reluctant to restart after running for a couple of minutes, there is something wrong, and it needs fixing.
Clean connections, good battery, properly charging system, etc. are essentials, but this discussion is basically about what if all these things are ok but the bike still just goes click. I've explained in posts that due to a design flaw in some of the models and years the headlight remains on during starting process while pressing start button which draws excessive juice and causes the CPU (brain) to stop the process because of how the low voltage cut-off is programmed and you just get click. Even a dealer cannot reprogram or remap it. It's a permanent setting. Part of the design flaw. Solution is to install a toggle switch on the headlight assembly so you can shut headlight off when starting to eliminate the excessive power draw. Taking the side cover off and shorting the solenoid terminals is another way to out-think the brain, but not as safe and practical as the toggle switch. Imagine your bike stalls at a traffic light because you didn't have the rpm's up enough when you let out clutch or you put bike in gear with side-stand down. Solenoid shorting requires getting off bike, removing side cover, getting screw driver out, etc. With toggle switch you can remain on bike, reach over to headlight assembly, shut off toggle switch, start up and go. A little embarrassed, but at least a quick recovery. :)
 

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Does anyone else have a Triumph Twin that does NOT turn off the headlight when you push the starter button? This is news to me.
 
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Does anyone else have a Triumph Twin that does NOT turn off the headlight when you push the starter button? This is news to me.
On all modern bikes with permanent headlights the headlight relay is normally interlocked with the starter relay (or via the ECU) to de-energise when starting, obviously older bikes had a normal headlight switch and they weren't permanently on, maybe they didn't make the modification straight away or it's only since manufacturers have been obsessed with cutting down weight and size, ie smaller batteries?
 

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Does anyone else have a Triumph Twin that does NOT turn off the headlight when you push the starter button? This is news to me.
The short answer is YES. When I first had the problem I googled something like "Triumph just goes click when starting" in the hope of finding help. I found various postings that had same problem; basically good battery, etc. but goes click. No solutions. I took bike to dealer who checked everything out and said all is well and operating as designed, which included the headlight staying on while pressing start button. After I told them my idea to put in a toggle switch, they said "Wow, good idea, halogen headlights draw alot of current". They never said "Oh wait you just need to replace a bad relay or some other electrical. The headlight should go off when pressing start button." They knew some of these models and years were poorly designed with this flaw AND because of the ECI module in the battery box which only allowed for enough room for a smaller battery than what should have been used.
 

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Does anyone else have a Triumph Twin that does NOT turn off the headlight when you push the starter button? This is news to me.
Is that a rhetorical question? I'm guessing that any Hinckley twin that hasn't been tampered with and the HEADLIGHT CUT-OUT relay is still in the system the answer would be no.
My Haynes manual shows all Hinckley 790 and 865 twins have a headlight cut-out relay.
 

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On all modern bikes with permanent headlights the headlight relay is normally interlocked with the starter relay (or via the ECU) to de-energise when starting, obviously older bikes had a normal headlight switch and they weren't permanently on, maybe they didn't make the modification straight away or it's only since manufacturers have been obsessed with cutting down weight and size, ie smaller batteries?
Due to a design flaw in some of the models and years the headlight remains on while pressing start button. It was just poor design. To make things worse, they placed the ECI module in the battery box which only allowed for enough room for a smaller battery than what should have been used. There was no thought as to cutting down weight with either of these design flaws. They are simply design flaws primarily during the time period that Triumph started marrying up Japanese electrical parts with British parts.
 

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Is that a rhetorical question? I'm guessing that any Hinckley twin that hasn't been tampered with and the HEADLIGHT CUT-OUT relay is still in the system the answer would be no.
My Haynes manual shows all Hinckley 790 and 865 twins have a headlight cut-out relay.
It wasn't a rhetorical question, although this is the first I've heard of it. The relay is a SPDT switch that turns off the headlight and then energizes the starting solenoid. It's one or the other, can't be both. I would assume that the relay is still there in the ECU bikes, unless they are somehow set up differently--separately--so the ECU can indeed try to start the bike while the headlight is one.
 

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It wasn't a rhetorical question, although this is the first I've heard of it. The relay is a SPDT switch that turns off the headlight and then energizes the starting solenoid. It's one or the other, can't be both. I would assume that the relay is still there in the ECU bikes, unless they are somehow set up differently--separately--so the ECU can indeed try to start the bike while the headlight is one.
I've done my best to explain that this problem was NOT something defective or missing on my bike alone. See #16. I had taken my bike to a large Triumph dealer who said that it was normal for headlight to stay on during starting on some of these models and years. Since I put the word out about how to fix the problem people on other sites have come forward confirming the headlight on problem. Two people onTriumphtalk.com posted that they had the headlight problem. After reading my post one of them installed a toggle switch on the handlebar of his bike with a clamp. He did this to be able to reach switch because windshield was in way. He posted photos (post #15). Also on Triumphforum.com post #3 a bike owner talks about bike he had saying "fitted a gizmo to keep headlight off until started." The posts on those other 2 sites confirm that the headlight on problem is NOT just me. :)
 
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