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Hi there another question for a beginner! :D i recently just fitted my t120r with some new amal carbs and i believe they came with a pair of velocity stack tubes.. I currently have a choice between the conical K&N air filters or the pancake ones. The Velocity stacks dont have a mesh grill on them just wondering what people prefer and is it safe to have no air filter and just the velocity stack tubes on your carb? Doesnt loads of dirt get in? Over and out!
 

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The grit that gets into your carbs from the road is fine dust as a rule and it is like putting lapping compound in your engine, at least the top end. Velocity stacks capture the fuel mixture that is spit out of the carbs as a normal part of the engine operation. For racing that means a bigger fuel air mixture for a few more ponies. On the street, they are more for looks than anything else. And if they are short and stubby, they probably don't do much but smooth out the air flow into the carb.

I believe in paper filter elements, so that means the stock pancake filters. I have used K&N and have on on a car because I have no other choice. But I am of the opinion that they pass more dirt than paper elements so I'm not a big fan of gauze filters.

regards,
Rob
 

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I think it depends on your geographical location.
My old `57 `twenty-one` wasn`t manufactured with air filters.
When Triumph exported to dusty environments, they were obliged to fit air-filters.
I have fitted long stacks to my bonnie:
 

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There is no doubt that location plays a role in what is available in the air to get sucked into your carbs. You never see an air filter on an outboard motor for obvious reasons. Don't believe small planes with piston engines run them either, but could be wrong about that.

You may not think your roads are dusty, but they are. If they were not, the air filter on your car would never need cleaning or replacement. Granted, the air flow past the carbs on a bike is a much cleaner environment than that trapped area under a hood (bonnet) but still there is road dust, made up of stone dust and other nasty things. If you run a K&N and wash it in soap and water, if the water gets dirty, that means your roads are dirty.

I think the original designers of engines never considered road dust until they started to see the effects when most roads were dirt. Could be when roads started to be oiled or paved that the assumption was the road dust problem was gone. And to a large extent, it was. But it is still there in sufficient amounts to add to engine wear.

By the way, those stacks look great on your bike Caulky. I've always loved the look of velocity stacks ever since I was a little kid and a guy in our neighborhood built a gorgeous '20's Chevy hot rod and had the stacks coming out an oval hole in the hood. I can still see that car in my alledged mind.

regards,
Rob
 

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If you want your engine to live a long and prosperous life you`ll want proper air filtration,if not go for the look of the stacks and be prepared to rebuild the top end sooner.
 
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