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Hi there,

I am going to replace the rear shock on the Bonnie and installed the Engine dresser bars from Calmoto.com.
I am trying to save some $ here after dealer told me he would charge me 1 hour ($80) to put my new shocks.

Questions are:
-What is the Torque for the shock screws and for the screw that holds the bottom part of the front engine to the frame? Can you please specify if your numbers are Foot-pound or Newton-metric?
-Then what drive size wrench should I get for metric screws ( 3/8, 1/2...)
Any decent TW that you can recommend ( I am a very occasional user though, not a pro ;-)
Thanks a bunch for your help.

I'll post picts of the Standard Bonnie once all mods are done. Nothing extreme, it still is the good old Bonnie not a wanna be Thrux or HD cruiser! and for reasonnable money overall. Wait till you see the Italian Tacho I found in Parma...It is a Bonnie fit and well, actually, kind of like the one on the Thrux....real cool ( 140.00 euros/170.00 USD)
 

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Torquenm--this is a copy of what I recently posted re torque wrenches in response to a question by dazco:

[I seem to remember a torque wrench thread last year in which one contributor was actually involved in calibration of these devices. To my pleasant surprise, the Craftsman wrenches tested quite well, especially in relation to the much more expensive Snap-Ons. I have three Craftsman clickers, one big monster for things like axle and drive sprocket bolts, one middle one for most work, and, since getting the T100, the 25-250 inch/pound clicker.
They cost about $75 for the big and little ones, a bit less for the middle one, probably as so many are sold of that model. I had to order the small clicker from Sears.com but that was no problem as it was in stock. There is a big difference between what is available online from Sears versus in the stores. Daz, it sounds like you've had unfortunate dud experience with Sears clickers. I've had my big and middle ones for about 15 years without a problem, but if I'd had your experience I would probably avoid them too. Were I a professional mechanic or multiple bike owner, I would slowly invest in pro tools, but for my mechanical needs, Craftsman is fine.]

The two smaller wrenches are 3/8" drive; while the big one is 1/2" drive.

Look at the menu to the left under "Downloads" then "Technical Aids" and you will find a download containing Bonnieville torque specs.
 

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torquenm...I'm possibly the "Calibration" individual that badrufus is referring to.
Honestly, I calibrate hundreds of torque wrenches every year and badrufus' advise concerning Craftsman is sound (just don't get the digitorque version). Torque wrenches in general are accurate to +4% and -6% of reading (it doesn't matter what brand). I've recently checked some Harbor Freight products that cost under $20 and they were right on also. If I'm not mistaking, Craftsman torque wrenches are made by the same company that does Matco's.

Shorty
 

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Hey Shorty!
I couldn't remember who it was who was the calibration expert. I've heard the same about the Digitork models--stay away. Interesting about the Harbor Freight. One question I would have is how they hold their calibration over time.
 

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Shorty - I realize I couldn't calibrate my Craftsman torque wrenches at home but is there some quick way I could tell if they are reading low, high, or right on? I'm thinking I could mount the socket drive in a vice, turn the wrench handle until it is horizontal, set the wrench for a mid range value, then begin adding "calibrated" weights until the wrench 'clicks'? If the wrench is set at 50lb/ft, and the wrench clicks with 45 pounds of weight, I'll know it reads low. If it clicks at 55 pounds of wt, I'll know to be careful when I use that wrench!

The hook holding the weights would be attached over the handle one foot from the socket drive (or in the mid point of the handgrip).

Also, since the wrenches probably aren't linear across their range, should the test be done at multiple settings (lo-med-hi)?

Am I way off thinking this would work?

Bob

[ This message was edited by: ohiorider on 2006-11-14 19:30 ]
 

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Bob...believe it or not, that is almost exactly how the Torque wrench calibrator is calibrated. There's a couple of things that come into play like Local Gravity, but that's really irrelevant for our purposes as "wrenchers" because the Calibrator tolerances are much tighter than the torque wrench tolerance.
Usually on Torque wrenches there's a groove or marking on the handle which is the "effective length" mark. Hang the weights at that point and be sure to tighten the vice real good so that the wrench won't fall out when you add the weights. If you don't have a groove or mark, hang the weights in the middle of the grip.
Badrufus...I don't know about how the Harbor freight wrenches will maintain their calibration over time 'cause I've only checked about half a dozen for a couple of guys at work here (all of them checked good, even though the quality was not on par to the Craftsman). It's a good idea to get any torque wrench checked every once in a while. We are required to check ours every (4) months only because they are used all the time 24/7 putting aircraft engines together. Going rate here in Texas at most calibration labs is about $25 to $35 if you don't require data.

Shorty

A quick PS. Always return your adjustable torque wrench to its lowest setting when your done and before storing it. Not doing so will cause more errors in accuracy than the occasional drop from your work bench :-D

[ This message was edited by: Shorty on 2006-11-15 06:28 ]
 

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Thanks, Shorty - all I need to do is find myself a source of weights, several 5 and 10# ones. Two of my wrenches (the smaller ones) are at least 15 years old, and I cringe sometimes when installing spark plugs in an aluminum cylinder head.

Bob
 
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