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The 2 L shaped goodies are all you need. However, they are expensive ! something like 60 bucks or something. I made 2 of them in a few minutes. First, you don't need L shaped ones. You just need pins about an inch long that are stepped down at the end like this...



You can use a screw or a metal dowel or whatever. The main part should be approximatlt 5 and 1/2 mm, the stepped down part about 4. Those are APPROXIMATE tho. Someone said 5.6 and 3.8 mm at BA once, but i found that too loose. they don't have to be perfect, but too loose isn't good. Take the cam cover off and find something that fits in the hole in one of the cam gears. Once you find one that fits snugly, step down the end by lathing it in a drill or grind it down with a dremel like i did. Once you get the end small enough to fit thru the hole thats it. The hole in the gear is lined up with a smaller hole in the backlash gear it's sandwiched to which is why you need a stepped down pin. W/O using the pin the backlash gear will have to be retensioned which you need a special tool for. One thing to note....if the pins don't fit tight, secure them somehow...tie em to a string and tape or whatever......you don't want them falling in !!! You KNOW how i know ! :wink:
 

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I wonder if I could get a long bolt that's the smaller diameter, and use a long plastic sleeve thingy with a washer at the head of the bolt and put a nut on the end...one of those nylon deals?
 

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Sweat, if you need, I can just mail you my pins; my dealership removed the whole mechanism from my cams, so I have absolutely no need of the pins. You would only need the spanner if you ever have to reset the mechanism. PM your mailiing address if you're interested.
 

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Incidentally, the tool #7 is for pulling the alternator rotor, and it's a piece of **it if your rotor is the least bit tight. The little peg you put in the end of the crank disintegrates with pressure. I ordered a Honda rotor puller from Flanders for $14 that works way better. Part # 325-01011. :wink:
 

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I made a pair out of machine screws about an inch long. I found a couple that were slightly too big to go thru holes, turned them down, then turned the ends down to go thru the small holes. I used a belt sander upside down in my lap. The smaller diameter ends are a bit off-center. I stuck them in the holes, gave them about 1/8 turn or so, and they wedged tightly in there.
What is the purpose of those gears, anyway?
Roundslide, what did the dealer say about pulling them out? :???:

[ This message was edited by: LT on 2006-12-05 19:44 ]
 

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I'm not sure i'd believe the only downside is noise. After all, triumph put them there for a reason...to cushion the strain on the cam chain the same way the cush rubbers cushion the drive chain. gately may know a lot, but since he probably rebuilds his bikes at the drop of a hat anyways it doesn't matter to him. Plus ask him if he ever specd a bike's chain after a given amount of miles then did the same with a bike with no backlash gear. Most people even those who know a lot can only guesstimate things like that w/o doing a study on it. personally i would never consider removing it. there are safer ways to get 1 HP.
As to the plastic idea, i dunno. But i did try shrink wrap to tighten it up and it was as tho i never put it on. The strength of the spring is pretty healty. You might instead tru a bolt ot whatever the size of the small hole and try and find a hollow metal tube. You can find various sizes of metal tubing at many hobby stores, tho finding the right size may or may not be easy.
 

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On 2006-12-05 19:44, sweatmachine wrote:
Bill Gately of Bonneville Performance told me that you can gain about 1hp if you remove them, and the only downside is increased engine noise.
LT, to answer your post, what SM is relaying is exactly what my dealership told me; of course it would have been nice if they'd told me the things were gone when I paid for the bike, I was more than a little irritated to have spent good money for the Triumph service tool, and then pull the cam cover and realize that that tool was useless for me.
 

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I believe that the spring loaded cam gears are only there for noise reduction. With today's quiet production motors, the gear noise along with all the other engine noises makes these modern bikes sound more like antique sewing machines than bikes. Incidentally, these cam chains are extremely well built compared to cam chains of similar motorcycles in the past, and they didn't seem to present any particular problems. Having spring loaded gear teeth grinding away on the load surface of the chain may actually accelerate wear just to gain a little less engine noise.
 

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On 2006-12-06 14:37, tcb wrote:
Having spring loaded gear teeth grinding away on the load surface of the chain may actually accelerate wear just to gain a little less engine noise.
TCB - If that's the way it worked, it would be a mess. The spring-loaded cam gears don't contact the timing chain. Their teeth mesh with the teeth on the drive gear, which is driven by the chain. It doesn't appear the chain-driven gear is of the spring-loaded type. This is illustrated in Chapter Three of the Triumph Service Manual.
 

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Not sure if i'm reading that right, but having taken the cams out i know the gear IS spring loaded. Thats the reason for the pins when removing them.
 

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On 2006-12-08 10:57, dazco wrote:
Not sure if i'm reading that right, but having taken the cams out i know the gear IS spring loaded. Thats the reason for the pins when removing them.
Daz - you're reading me wrong. I know the cam gears on the end of the camshafts are spring loaded, and must be held in place with the special tool pins or homemade pins. What I'm saying is it doesn't look like the drive gear in between the cam gears is spring loaded, at least the sprocket that is driven by the timing chain.

Bob
 

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You're right; there are two cam gears on a common shaft, the gear that is actually driven by the cam chain, and then the gear that actually meshes with the intake and exhaust camshaft gears and backlash mechanism gears.
 

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I see... and as RS said it's not. Didin't realize you meant the drive gear. Sorry.
 
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