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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just curious on what other bonnie/thruxton riders are experiencing. i replaced the rear brake pads today after checking them out this morning and being surprised that almost all the brake material was worn off, especially on the inside pad. both pads were in need of replacement, but the inside pad was noticably worse.

when i was at the dealer picking up new pads there was a guy with a bonnie, just over a year old (my thrux is abot 15-16 months old, 8200 miles) and he was replacing his rear pads too, and descbibed the same exact thing i did, and we both hardly use our rear brake. i only use it at a stop light when i am at a standstill while keeping my left foot on the ground, and then occasionally if i need a hint of braking in a turn i will feather the rear brake. also occasionally use it with the front when stopping, but the front takes the brunt of it. i replaced the front pads last year after a crash just because i blew up the master cylinder, and figured what the heck, i might as well replace them now, but they were only maybe 60% gone.

just curious what everyone else has experienced.
 

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These are my rear brake pads at 12000 miles. Definitely not the same wear each side, but not a lot different, and a fair bit of material left.

 

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My rear pads too wore out far more quickly! In fact, I still have the fronts on at 14k miles; eyeball estimate is they are at about 40%.
I was more of a rear braker initially, so I thought that was the reason, but you say you are a front braker. Don't know, but I nearly had to replace the rotor with the rears, so I check the pads often!
 

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Brakes

For some odd reason the inside pad wears out faster than the outer! Got the same thing!
I used sintered pads in the RR & the ft is still servicabble.
 

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The twin pot Nissin rear calipers fitted are renowned for sticking on they`re floating slide pins and also the main caliper pistons.

This can be a major factors in uneven pad wear as with sticky slide pins then the caliper body won`t centralise to the disc causing greater wear in the pad furthest from the pistons.

If the pistons are sticking then you`ll get greater wear on both pads but more on the one closest to the pistons.

I really don`t understand why some folk will spend a fortune on the looks, performance, and handling on they`re bikes but neglect the brakes that save them from that "Oh ****!!!!" everytime they go out on they`re bikes.

Triumph rear brake calipers need to be stripped and cleaned at least once a year without fail to keep them in good working condition and almost every bike shop whether it be main dealer or not will just replace the pads at a service and never think to check the overall condition of the rest of the caliper operation.

Silicone grease or red rubber grease will work wonders on caliper pins and brake pistons without damaging your seals once everything has been cleaned up properly.

Cheers, Matt :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
yeah, i went to town on the rear brake and gave it a good cleaning with some break cleaner and lightly greased the pins and the backs of the pads. we'll se what happens. maybe i will do an extra thorough job next week when i get the new rear tire put on.

i dont know how the heck you guys are getting 12k miles on your front pads?! i guess i do ride my bike like it's stolen, but i dont ride the brakes (my subaru has 40k miles and the pads dont even look worn!) and always engine brake. i guess part of the fact may have been living in colorado for the last year and always hitting the mountain roads and canyons, which force you to brake al lot more than most, plus i do hammer on the bike pretty hard ( i swear the bike seems to like being ridden hard better than just putting along!)

i personally dont think it's necessary for me to upgrade my brakes at this time. i dont have a big bore and still have stock carbs with the typical aftermarket pipes and airbox removed. the bike stops just fine for my taste.
 

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I use the brakes lightly and was surprised that my front pads only lasted 10,000 miles. Whenever possible I just let off the throttle and coast down a ways; then usually apply 1 finger to the lever. But I don't downshift, let out the clutch and engine brake... not for normal stops anyway... that just seems a silly way to use up the clutch. Anyway only 10,000 miles and I did have uneven wear on inside and outside pads. Every vehicle I've ever changed pads on had uneven wear though. I was not concerned with the uneven wear... just with the short life.
So I did a little math... maybe its not altogether the right way to look at it but here goes:
Ford Ranger pickup: weight: approx 2800 pounds with fuel and driver,
Bonneville T100: weight: approx 735 with fuel and rider.
Ford Ranger Pickup: pounds force at 70 MPH: 473,362.
Bonneville: pounds force at 70 mph: 124,257.
Ford Ranger Pickup front brake pad contact area: 35 & 3/4 sq inches.
Bonneville front brake pad contact area: 6.47 sq inches.

The truck has about 5.5 times more brake contact area than the bike and has to dissipate 3.8 times more energy to stop than the bike. (I'm discounting the rear brakes. They do next to nothing on either truck or bike)
So one would think that the truck brakes should last a little longer than the bike brakes... about 1.5 times longer if all other factors are even. But my truck brakes last EIGHT times longer. I get 80,000 miles out of a set of pads on the truck. (My rear shoes on the truck were almost worn out at 230,000 miles so they don't really count).
I'm just wondering why?
I put on EBCs at this last change on the bike... Maybe they will last longer.
 

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i am guessing you dont really do a lot of 'spirited' riding, or i could me wrong. but if you've ever ridding your bike somewhat aggressively or on super-twisty roads, especially ones in the mountains that also have a lot of elevation gain you will reply on engine braking in conjunction with your regular brakes! it's pretty much essential. i am not saying that i am a great, skilled rider, (because i'm not!), but i just can't imagine coming down some of the steep twisties i've been on or mountain roads and just relied on my brakes. maybe this is something that has just crossed over for me from driving cars in the mountains and up and over mountain passes, but you should always engine brake along with your regular brakes. if you've ever been driving down a pass and smelled brakes pads and then seen an 18-wheeler on the side of the road either smoking or has the wheels lit up, glowing red it's because he rode the brakes too much and didn't engine brake (and was probably going too fast!.
 

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I recently bought a 2007 bonnie 3,000 or so miles on it. I took it in for some service before the warranty ran out and the dealer said I needed new brake pads! 3,000 miles? Was he trying to snow me? He said they were down to 25% and that the pads were just soft that way. Has anyone had this experience?
 

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It's possible. Have a look at them. Remove the caliper bolts, pull the caliper off the disk, and see for yourself. Don't pull the brake lever or push the pedal while the caliper is off the disk, or you'll have to push the pistons back in. Carefully wipe everything off with a clean rag while you have it apart.

My replacement Triumph pads are 5mm thick, with wear slots cut into them, if I remember correctly.
 

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I wore through the front pads on my beringer calipers in less than 1000 miles! I replaced the pads and ensured the pads moved freely on the pins with some brake lube and now the pads have barely worn after 1000 miles. Its important to ensure the pads can slide on the pins
 

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So is it best for the overall health of the bike to downshift and use the engine to help slow you down? Or is it best to use the brakes to slow down and not the engine? Or somewhere in the middle?
 

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Depends....

It all depends on how hard you are going, and how quick you need to get your speed down...

The Triumph has quite good engine braking, and that's usually enough ... unless you are racing your mates on the windy back roads...:D
Then, you go in hard, hammer the front brake hard, maybe downshift, get her into the corner, aim for the apex, and gassit... :D

S.
 

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T100 2007,I replaced my rear pads about 4000kms ago in april original ones were down to metal when I put the new ones on I noticed they were binding slightly to the disc hoped this mite stop once they wore in but apperantly not as they are gone again,I hardly ever use the rear brakes I see from other posts this seems common was wondering if I should get the dealer to sort out as I have a month left on warranty,but to be honest I have no confidence in our local dealer they have stuffed me around before,had some issues I had to get sorted elsewhere,could it just be the slide pins are sticking and need cleaning and lubing,front brakes are fine I give them heaps no excessive wear at all.brent
 

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I hardly ever use the rear brakes I see from other posts this seems common was wondering if I should get the dealer to sort out as I have a month left on warranty
Unfortunately rear brake pad wear isn't a warranty issue, it's a maintenance issue. The rear caliper isn't the best and maybe if Triumph had positioned it above the swinging arm we wouldn't have as many seizure issues. To keep even pad wear, the caliper really needs to be cleaned twice a year depending on the weather and conditions you ride in. The big downside of a partially seized caliper, apart from pad wear, is the engine is constantly fighting the rear brake.
 

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Unfortunately rear brake pad wear isn't a warranty issue, it's a maintenance issue. The rear caliper isn't the best and maybe if Triumph had positioned it above the swinging arm we wouldn't have as many seizure issues. To keep even pad wear, the caliper really needs to be cleaned twice a year depending on the weather and conditions you ride in. The big downside of a partially seized caliper, apart from pad wear, is the engine is constantly fighting the rear brake.
+1 , If I did not have to ride on dirt and rock roads, I would remove it all.
 

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Same as BMW

I have recently PXed a BMW Rockster for a Bonnie.

The rear pads on the BMW (R1150 based) wore in exactly the same fashion although maintained to the highest standards.

When I purchased a replacement set. (Genuine BMW) They were supplied in two different thicknesses so that in theory, they wore out together.

I think it's just the design of the rear caliper design.

Picture here:-

http://media.photobucket.com/image/bmw rear pads/Phang/DSCN5658.jpg

Ian.
 

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So is it best for the overall health of the bike to downshift and use the engine to help slow you down? Or is it best to use the brakes to slow down and not the engine? Or somewhere in the middle?
Both methods of slowing the bike/auto are OK and do not harm any thing. For safety, using engine to slow the vehicle down is better especially on the less the ideal road surface. Practice downshift often, so that in an emergency, it comes to a second nature that you downshift and brake all at once, without loss control. However, if you have ABS, then brake the hell of it.
 

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being surprised that almost all the brake material was worn off, especially on the inside pad. both pads were in need of replacement, but the inside pad was noticably worse.
It is not unusual that the inner pad (one close to the brake cylinder) wears out faster. It is just a nature of the design and physics that governs it.
 
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