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Discussion Starter #1
I'm wanting to learn more about the TuneECU software while waiting for the cable to arrive. My big questions are what are the various graphs in the "Table" section and the what data is represented by the graphs and tables. Any help or other tips would be greatly appreciated.
 

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RPM is at left column. Throttle position is from 0 - 100% across the top. At the intersection of every RPM and throttle setting is the air/fuel ratio.

Best to find and implement a map appropriate for your air filter and exhaust setup. If you compare alternative maps to the stock map you'll almost always see more fuel added to remedy flat spots. Once you're comfortable with backing up and changing out maps you're ready to progress to the next level. You might want to change your idle speed, the temperature at which your radiator fan activates, etc. If you have a flat spot somewhere in the power curve you might add more fuel to an appropriate range of cells. Play around with it but make absolutely sure you keep old maps and have very good notes as to how they performed. Not every change will be in a positive direction and you'll often need to go back to a previous map.

My 2000 TT600 came with a modified stock map that had big problems in the 3000 - 5000 RPM range. I replaced map 10088 (for 2000 TT600's with stock exhaust) with map 100089 (for 2000 TT600 with aftermarket exhaust). On startup the RPM is much lower and it quickly idles down to a non standard 1100 RPM I'm happy with. The hole from 3000 - 5000 is gone. I have the fan kicking in at 200 instead of 215 (if I recall correctly).
 

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To add my piece;
there are various published' tunes for the bike which you can freely download; including Triumph's official tunes for stock bikes or bikes fitted with the official Arrow free-flow exhaust, but these are constrained by the emissions targets they need to achieve . You can also find tunes that have been developed by individuals who swear they are a great improvement on their bike but you use these at your own risk.
You can also buy tunes professionally developed by Triumph Twin Power, (TTP) which come in a variety of flavours depending on the modifications you have made to your bike. Most people, (including me), swear by these as they improve the power characteristics, (at the expense of emissions and sometimes, fuel consumption).
Very few people actually alter the cells themselves as you can destroy your engine quite easily if you don't know what you're doing, but you may be a fuel-injection engineer for all I know!
So generally, most folk use TuneECU to download previously developed tunes and use the diagnostics tab to help with maintenance and trouble-shooting.
 

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Patrickcol: You're close, I'm a mechanical engineering student in my last semester! Back to TuneECU, I don't wish to alter the established tables and maps, but as a soon to be ME I'd like to know what I'm looking at. Looking at the different tables, I can reason the F1 and F2 tables are fuel tables, possibly for each cylinder. Nothing comes to mind for the L1 and L2 tables. The I1,I2 and I3 tables might be ignition tables. The A-F table is obviously air-fuel ratios, but the data in the F and I tables is unclear. I plan on adding the TEC Bike Parts Tracker 2:1 exhaust and downloading the Arrow 2:1 map and possibly getting the appropriate TTP tune in the future.
 

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The F tables are for fueling at higher engine speeds based on throttle position and rpm. For each cylinder. The L tables are for low engine speed based on manifold pressure and rpm. I Tables for ignition advance. The F table values represent air mass values that are used to determine fuel mass values. There is also a F-L switch where both come into play. If the bike has oxygen sensors, then there is closed loop and open loop functions for fueling. This is rather simplified, but you get the idea. And, as stated, without a dyno and gas analysis, fooling around with these values can get you into trouble, especially touching the ignition parameters. You can spend hours reading up on TuneECU in the forum section with the corresponding postings about specific questions. There are some very knowledgeable folks here concerning TuneECU. I'm not one of them. I do the reading myself to learn.
 
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