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I have Dunlop on the front and the stock Bridgestones on the back of my Sprint. I bought it this year and it had Bridgestones on both front and back.

I heard poor reviews for the Bridgestones so when it was time to change the fronts I went with a Dunlop and keeping the back to Bridgestone because it had at least another season.

Is this dangerous? and why?

Cheers
 

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The first question I would ask is why the front needed replacing before the rear; the usual rule is two fronts to a rear if you're not changing them as a set.

Tires are designed to work as a set, yada yada yada... Generally, it's fine to mix them within the same class: different brands of sport/touring rubber in front and back, different brands of sport tires front and back.

It's also generally okay to run a sport front with sport/touring rear, as long as you remember your front is likely to wear out first!

The danger of mixing tires really comes into play when you have more grip in the rear than you do up front. That can get real ugly, real fast.

So you're probably fine, but Bridgestone and Dunlop doesn't tell us much. You say stock, so that make the rear a BT-021, but which Dunlop is up front?

Cheers,
-Kit
 

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The danger of mixing tires really comes into play when you have more grip in the rear than you do up front. That can get real ugly, real fast.
I didn't know that, is the rule not the same as for cars?. On them the "best" tyres should always go at the rear, regardless of whether it's front or rear drive.
 

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Don't know much about 4-wheelers, but I've always been told the best tire should go in front on a bike and have had no problem at all with such a setup. Never tried it the other way personally as I have no interest in proving that theory empirically!

Cheers,
-Kit
 

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First time I've heard a rationale that makes sense–less grip on rear dangerous. In other words, I've got a much better chance of pulling things together if my rear end gets a little loose.

Given that I always change rear before front, I'll be more aware. Thanks.
 

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I've read that mixing radial and bias ply is not recommended. On my 2010 Thruxton it was a bias ply up front and a radial in the rear. So that theory goes all to hell. I wonder if this has anything to do with running a tube?

Motorcycle tires generally are quite different on the front than the rear, even in the same brand/model. I honestly don't think that a huge amount of engineering goes into how those tires work together, considering the wide variety of configurations you might run across on different bikes. A lot of sport bikes run a 120 in front and a 180 rear, I can't imagine that those two tires have a lot of the same characteristics even in the same model.
 
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