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1. DivaDanielle's tune is also reversible, just reload the original which is on the TuneECU site.
2. Then there is the factory AFR etc. It is designed to pass the DOT/EPA/EU5-4, not as blatantly configured as the VW diesel setup, but it meets the test criteria and is not necessarily the most drivable/ridable tune. The factory tune for all T120's is the same. The Speed Twin will all be the same but different from the T120.

I have always been so very confident - not, of standards and regulations created by people that have no technical experience.
1. Not fully reversible as in Triumph can tell its been remapped at some point .
2. I think @kdxandrew meant the power commander dyno tune would be specific to your bike and the AFR would be optimal, something you can't be sure of with a generic tune done on a completely different bike (also the case with the original factory tune obviously).
 

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1. Not fully reversible as in Triumph can tell its been remapped at some point .
2. I think @kdxandrew meant the power commander dyno tune would be specific to your bike and the AFR would be optimal, something you can't be sure of with a generic tune done on a completely different bike (as is the original factory tune obviously).
My T120 has shown a remap after each dealer visit, but supposedly there have been no updates to the ECU code by Triumph!
 

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I put a Meerkat x-pipe on my T120 before the warranty expired. No issues. The dealer installed these regularly for other customers. In the US, a warranty can’t be voided unless YOU break the bike. When DNK happened I bought a tune and the bike ran better than stock. It didn’t become a Rocket but it was well worth $200. I had a more heavily modded Rocket which a absolutely needed a PCIII and dyno tune. There were a million “custom” tunes out there but none of them worked.
 

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1. Not fully reversible as in Triumph can tell its been remapped at some point .
2. I think @kdxandrew meant the power commander dyno tune would be specific to your bike and the AFR would be optimal, something you can't be sure of with a generic tune done on a completely different bike (as is the original factory tune obviously).
Yes - we are lucky to have a very good dyno tuner nearby, but he doesn't use TuneECU. I think having the custom tune for the specific bike is worthwhile.
 

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Discussion Starter · #606 ·
1. Not fully reversible as in Triumph can tell its been remapped at some point .
2. I think @kdxandrew meant the power commander dyno tune would be specific to your bike and the AFR would be optimal, something you can't be sure of with a generic tune done on a completely different bike (also the case with the original factory tune obviously).
1. No. Verified on-site at a Triumph dealership that we have a really good relationship with. No breadcrumbs.

We did our homework.

Sent from my SM-G998U using Tapatalk
 

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I didn't mention warranties but just being pedantic and pointing out that its not fully returned back to previous condition if you install a modified map and then reload the original factory map.
Yes, its true that the download count appears to increment when dealers connect to the bike but in between visits to the dealer it will not increment if you don't remap your bike, if you remap then it will.

Also just because your bike feels "faster" is no guarantee that the AFR is correct across all the rev range and throttle positions, unless you've had it checked on a dyno after installing a generic tune, unfortunately most people don't bother.

I'm not against generic tunes, both mine have been remapped but have also been checked on a dyno and have required a few tweaks to perfect them.


EDIT- Can I also point out that this was a reply to previous comments and I was typing before @TheDivaDanielle reply above so was not a response to her post.
Since a recent bloody Windows update:mad: many of the forum functions don't work including being able to quote other posts which can make replies misleading.
 
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I'm a little confused. What does Diva mean with the statement, "No breadcrumbs" ? Does that mean there is no trace of any ECU alteration after a DNK tune is loaded, and then reverted back to the stock tune?

I had a '18 Tiger that was under warranty. Triumph could not fix a stalling issue, so I tried fixing it myself with numerous (6 or 7) DNK tunes. We could never eliminate the stalling by tuning so I reverted back to the stock tune. I then let Triumph try and fix it again. They couldn't and I successfully ended up going Lemon Law.

My point is that even though I threw numerous tunes at it, Triumph never came back to me denying my case with, "Hey pal, you've altered the tune many times and you're now SOL." Does that mean Triumph did not "see" that I altered it or they had their heads up their.....
 

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I'm a little confused. What does Diva mean with the statement, "No breadcrumbs" ? Does that mean there is no trace of any ECU alteration after a DNK tune is loaded, and then reverted back to the stock tune?

I had a '18 Tiger that was under warranty. Triumph could not fix a stalling issue, so I tried fixing it myself with numerous (6 or 7) DNK tunes. We could never eliminate the stalling by tuning so I reverted back to the stock tune. I then let Triumph try and fix it again. They couldn't and I successfully ended up going Lemon Law.

My point is that even though I threw numerous tunes at it, Triumph never came back to me denying my case with, "Hey pal, you've altered the tune many times and you're now SOL." Does that mean Triumph did not "see" that I altered it or they had their heads up their.....
Maybe it's just good customer service(!!). They fixed my indicator fault under warranty (stopped flashing), even though the bike has never been back for a dealer service since the first 800km check, and has been extensively tampered with ("modified') - including me farting around in the circuitry with TuneECU (which, incidentally, was the point at which the indicators stopped flashing). No quibbles, just fixed it.
 

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Maybe a bit of a silly question but I hear the aftermarket tunes get rid of the decel exhaust pops. Is it possible to keep the popping for aural pleasure while cleaning up the AFR and all? I know on cars you can retard the timing on overrun and low load and disable any fuel cuts to induce it, I suppose you can do the same on a bike?
 

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Maybe a bit of a silly question but I hear the aftermarket tunes get rid of the decel exhaust pops. Is it possible to keep the popping for aural pleasure while cleaning up the AFR and all? I know on cars you can retard the timing on overrun and low load and disable any fuel cuts to induce it, I suppose you can do the same on a bike?
yes you can. I had mine done by diva without changing 0% throttle on deceleration.
 

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Ok, here goes! Way back when I bought my Triumph Thruxton R in 2016 and fitted a straight through Verex system, I was told that if I didn’t pay $1700 AUD and fit a power commander and have my bike dynoed to set it up I was going to blow my engine up. A little bit of study and a dyno run exposed these fraudsters!
Well here I am in 2021 with the same bike, over 30,000klm and numerous track days it’s still going, even stronger!
Since then I have had DNK to send me a base map, which was modded a couple of times, to reduce popping on engine over run!
I was never 100% happy as riding in traffic was s$&t to say the least, surging a little, still popping but not as bad, but all bad enough that I kept away from major centres on this bike.
I have had tune Ecu for some time and have been reading and studying it closely to see what I felt comfortable to change/ adjust!
So, here goes!
I had a fault come up on a 02 sensor, did much diagnostics and found that both sensors, in the end, came up with fault codes, on both sides(heater and sensor) so I removed them and unchecked the box in the map and reloaded map! I also changed all afr in closed loop feed back to 13.8! I then reduced the FL switching from 20% throttle to zero!
Took it up and put it on the dyno, on the ride up I noted that the bike was running very well and popping on over run was just a throaty grumble! No snatchy or surging on throttle, very smooth in 2 and 3 gear at low speeds! Would put this down to operating directly off map and no Manifold Air Pressure operation at lower RPM! Nor suspect 02 sensors!
We spent a couple of hours on dyno and did testing at most throttle percentage settings across various loads which showed where engine was either running running rich or lean. In most cases it was lean in mid ranges!
I made adjustments in these areas according to either how rich or lean it was.
Loaded reconfigured map and the bike feels so much smoother in operation right through the gears and all rpm ranges.
A pleasure to ride and have done a track day since!
Pleased to get my head around Tune ECU and be confident enough to have a informed go at it using a dyno!
Thanks DNK for base tune definitely a step in the direction I needed to go but even happier now.
 

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Maybe a bit of a silly question but I hear the aftermarket tunes get rid of the decel exhaust pops. Is it possible to keep the popping for aural pleasure while cleaning up the AFR and all? I know on cars you can retard the timing on overrun and low load and disable any fuel cuts to induce it, I suppose you can do the same on a bike?
I did the opposite on mine: I changed the L-Tables for just the decel areas. I cut the fuel to 0 for the higher rev range to increase engine braking, then added a transition area around 2000 RPM where pops are deliberately induced. At around 1800 it gradually returns to stock values to provide a smooth transition close to the idle speed.
In that transition area, the mixture is actually leaner than stock. It causes the fuel not to burn, but instead it ends up in the hot exhaust along with oxygen. The result is expectable. :)
 

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I did the opposite on mine: I changed the L-Tables for just the decel areas. I cut the fuel to 0 for the higher rev range to increase engine braking, then added a transition area around 2000 RPM where pops are deliberately induced. At around 1800 it gradually returns to stock values to provide a smooth transition close to the idle speed.
In that transition area, the mixture is actually leaner than stock. It causes the fuel not to burn, but instead it ends up in the hot exhaust along with oxygen. The result is expectable. :)
I can see that you know the RPM where decel popping occurs but how do you know the manifold pressure (MAP) at closed throttle?
 

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I can see that you know the RPM where decel popping occurs but how do you know the manifold pressure (MAP) at closed throttle?
I recorded some data while driving. There's numerous tools for it - the OBDLink App, Torque etc., plus TuneECU. TuneECU has a weird log format if I recall correctly - it produces one line per reading, so you don't get one column per sensor, but instead you have a whole stack of data mixed together. I used it nonetheless because every app seems to have slight deviations in Throttle Grip readings and I trust TuneECU the most. Irecorded MAP, RPM and Throttle Grip, sorted it into columns, filtered for Throttle Grip readings < 10%, filtered for RPM > 1500 and then looked at the results. Since measurements don't happen at the exact same time, you can't just plot RPM vs. MAP. Data extraction could be automated, but with such a filtered list you can easily read the relevant pressures off yourself.

I then use a script to modify the stock tables. It pays off because while you can easily insert zeroes, smoothing out the edges by hand is hard. Without smoothing, the engine will react very jerky, not only making for an uncomfortable ride but also adding wear on the clutch, rear wheel dampeners and so on.

Here's a quick picture of the result from TuneECU:

Purple Rectangle Font Violet Display device


And here's the original map compared against the modified one. Note how only the upper left set of cells was changed (white dots), which is the decel region:
Colorfulness Rectangle Purple Font Pattern
 

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I recorded some data while driving. There's numerous tools for it - the OBDLink App, Torque etc., plus TuneECU. TuneECU has a weird log format if I recall correctly - it produces one line per reading, so you don't get one column per sensor, but instead you have a whole stack of data mixed together. I used it nonetheless because every app seems to have slight deviations in Throttle Grip readings and I trust TuneECU the most. Irecorded MAP, RPM and Throttle Grip, sorted it into columns, filtered for Throttle Grip readings < 10%, filtered for RPM > 1500 and then looked at the results. Since measurements don't happen at the exact same time, you can't just plot RPM vs. MAP. Data extraction could be automated, but with such a filtered list you can easily read the relevant pressures off yourself.

I then use a script to modify the stock tables. It pays off because while you can easily insert zeroes, smoothing out the edges by hand is hard. Without smoothing, the engine will react very jerky, not only making for an uncomfortable ride but also adding wear on the clutch, rear wheel dampeners and so on.

Here's a quick picture of the result from TuneECU:

View attachment 752217

And here's the original map compared against the modified one. Note how only the upper left set of cells was changed (white dots), which is the decel region:
View attachment 752218
I’m surprised at all the zeros in the stock L. I dealt with popping under hard decel at zero throttle on a Rocket with a Powercommander. Much easier solution.
 

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I might have been unclear there: the zeroes are from my modified map. The stock one only has the "zero column" on the left.
I thought about a PC too, especially with AutoTune wideband sensors it would be nice to play with. But since I didn't mod my engine other than changing slipons and don't look for more power, it seemed overdone, so I went with the TuneECU route. I think it would be the better option once you work on engine internals or do bigger intake/exhaust changes.
 
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Another DNK_Tune happy customer. 2020 T120 with just the deCAT. Same results as others have mentioned, power, revs quicker and very smooth. Use to ride in "rain" mode with my passenger just to help smooth throttle in slow going. This in itself made the change worth while but the other added features really change the bike for the better. Couple things to note that others might benefit from mentioning as was my experience -

  • TuneECU was bit of a mystery at first. It's simply the app used to change the tune file which DNK supplies. The TuneECU forum web site is somewhat rambling and confusing at first but there are a few key sticky postings which are good to read. TuneECU is similar to using DealerTool, but DNK only works with TuneECU.
  • TuneECU has more capability than just changing the bikes tune map. Takes some digging to learn but it's a useful app in many other ways.
  • Play with the TuneECU app a bit prior to loading the file. Especially if you're not an Android user. The app asked to register the bike which is good to get out of the way first. I'm an iPhone user and had to source a used Android device which took the most time, learning curve etc. Not a big deal just something to consider.
  • OBDLink LX - The LX which paired easily with the bike. Mine also asked to update the LX firmware. Again, something best to do prior to dealing with the tune file. There's actually an OBDLink app which I'm not sure you need to install in order to use it. I did, but didn't need to use it to connect with TuneECU.
  • TuneECU folder - after receiving the DNK_Tune file there's a TuneECU folder where the file can be placed and found easily when you decide to load it. Don't recall any mention of this?
  • Another rider asked me how the DNK_Tune effect "rain mode?" Don't know the answer to this but I'm sure @TheDivaDanielle will have an answer.
Excited to get out and ride the bike some more. Almost seems too good to be true. In fairness, can't remember a new bike that didn't have some type of fueling or related ride-ability issues. Carb or fuel injected. We know manufactures are faced with ever changing emissions regulations. Seems to be just part of the game to make bikes run their best. Don't think there's anything that gives quite the return for money spent better than installing DNK_Tune.
 

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Put Divas tune in my Speed Twin a couple days ago. Finally got out today briefly to make sure it was all uploaded correctly. Straight of the bat (once warmed up) I noticed it pulled harder. Then about 10min in i noticed it had defaulted back to road mode so flicked it up to sport for the full beans. First time I have gotten traction control to light up in higher gears. Thumbs up Diva.
Did the DNK tune get rid of the snatchy/jerky throttle at low RPM in gears 1-3 for you? I noticed it being slightly better in Sport mode for me but not eliminated. Road mode is still very snatchy/jerky to the point that I don’t ever use it. I’m happy with higher gear RMP performance but was definitely hoping for some smoother throttle response in those lower gears.
 

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Did the DNK tune get rid of the snatchy/jerky throttle at low RPM in gears 1-3 for you? I noticed it being slightly better in Sport mode for me but not eliminated. Road mode is still very snatchy/jerky to the point that I don’t ever use it. I’m happy with higher gear RMP performance but was definitely hoping for some smoother throttle response in those lower gears.
This is for a T120. I noticed that low throttle was smoother in rain mode. So I copied the rain mode ETV table (ETV 2 on the T120) up to 6.2% throttle position into the same area of the road mode ETV 1 table. This retains the higher end power but smooths it out at throttle. You can try that on a copy of the DNK tune in both the road and sport etv tables. Make sure you figure out which is which because it’s not 1, 2, 3 for rain, road, and sport.
 
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