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Discussion Starter #1
I've got a couple of longer trips coming up this year and the issue of repairs to punctures in my tubed tyres is taxing me. Not having done any longer tours on my Tiger, my attitude so far has been "get a puncture; get a ride home and deal with it there". To-date, I've not had to put this into practise. Now, if I'm travelling somewhere in Europe, that's not really what I want to do. So, how difficult is it to get what's essentially a tubeless tyre off the rim to to do a fix. Is this possible the 'old fashioned' way with tyre levers, or is bead breaking going to be a stopper for a DIY fix? What's the best way to approach the potential puncture problem? If they were tubeless wheels, I'd carry an emergency plugging kit and gas cartridge.
 

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Hi Mate,

Although I carry all the gear to fix a puncture, the thought of actually doing it in the middle of nowhere makes me feel sick :(

To actually get a tyre off the rim is a major job, i.e. - breaking the bead. One of the well known techniques is to use some one elses side stand and the weight of the bike. Once you break the bead, it's a case of some super long strong tyre levers to get the leverage to pull the tyre off the rim. After that it's quite straight forward fixing the puncture, getting the tyre back on and pumping it up.

I always carry a quality cycle hand pump tucked away on the bike, a stripped down Halfords 12volt tyre inflator and gas cartridges.

It might be a good idea to get some European Breakdown Cover and just get your bike recovered to a tyre fitter.

Do a search on the ADV Rider website and you'll find lots of threads on the subject.
 

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For what its worth I use Ultra Seal (Now Puncture Seal).

This is a gel which is squirted in through the valve (Valve removed). You then run the bike to spread the stuff. It remains a gel on the inside of the tyre and if the tyre is penetrated it seals the puncture.

I installed it after stabbing a tyre all day at a show, on a display stand and it stayed inflated.

When I changed my last rear there was two very small nails in it. They penetrated, were sealed by the gel and then they ground flat with the tyre. I did not even know there were there even after careful inspection.

The only worry is you may not even know you have had a puncture. Biy thats what you want, piece of mind

By the way I have no coonnection with Ultra Seal as a company
 

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Chazzy,
With a bike the weight and power of the Tiger, I'd never even consider using patches on the tube so that would commit you to carrying 2 tubes. As you say, removing the tyre from the rim is problematic - I struggled in the garage at home. It doesn't bear thinking about by the side of the road at 2000 metres in the Alps in a snowstorm. There are folk who reckon they can break the bead seal with the prop stand but they're obviously better men than me.

The only real solution is to seal the spoke ends and go tubeless - I did that 3 years ago and have had no problems at all. The pressure stays rock steady. This lets me carry the plugs / CO2 bottles, as well as a little compressor (a cheapy from Aldi / Lidl that I just took the guts out of).

Having said that, I'm of an age and experience where I'd probably just let the breakdown service (free with my Carole Nash insurance) take the strain.....
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks all.

Clearly a DIY tube change (I don't patch tubes) at the side of the road isn't a viable option. Perhaps I'll carry a spare rear tube so at least that can get fitted after recovery. I have Euro-wide recovery but I want to make sure I can continue a journey PDQ. I have mixed feelings about Slime/Ultraseal-type products. I have a gut feeling I want to know about having a puncture-type intrusion into my tyre. Any road up, I've got a few months to make my mind up.
 

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I carry extra tubes and all I need to remove a tube and patch it. Be sure you have all the tools needed to remove either wheel and don't forget the valve tool. You only need to get one bead off of the rim and to break the bead I use a big C-clamp. Three tire irons is a must. Use any means to inflate that you want. I have CO2 and a motopump.
I've patched several tubes on the side of the road and although it is not what I would like to be doing, I know that the occasional breakdown is part of the challenge of bike travel. I get immense satisfaction in diagnosing and fixing a problem and getting me and the bike home.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
And another thing...

... so there you are, on your own at the side of the road, with a front wheel puncture. You've managed to get the bike onto the centre stand. How do you stop the forks hitting the ground when you take the wheel out? :confused:
 

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... so there you are, on your own at the side of the road, with a front wheel puncture. You've managed to get the bike onto the centre stand. How do you stop the forks hitting the ground when you take the wheel out? :confused:

If you've got three panniers on the bike it will move the CofG further back and allow the front wheel to lift off the ground. If it doesn't, keep putting heavy things like bricks in the panniers, on the rear rack to lift the front wheel clear.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
If you've got three panniers on the bike it will move the CofG further back and allow the front wheel to lift off the ground. If it doesn't, keep putting heavy things like bricks in the panniers, on the rear rack to lift the front wheel clear.
What, rip up kerb stones? ;)

The centre stand on my T140 must be right at the centre of gravity. Take either wheel out and it rests back on the one still in. I did have to prop it up when I took both wheels to get new rubber fitted recently.
 
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