Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
OK, firstly I realise I'm likely to get a biased opinion on here and thats fine, but any help or advice would be great!

Now, I will be looking at test riding both the SV (K3-onwards, pointy version) and the TT in the near future, but right now I'd really appreciate some opinions on the two bikes. As i see it, both are blessed with good brakes and handling. However, the SV is a 650cc bike and produces 70bhp & 47.2lb/ft vs. the TT600's 86.8bhp & 43.5lb/ft - why is this? V-twin vs. in-line four? And as such, is the TT a quicker machine, or will I not really notice the difference on the open road?

Secondly, my requirements. I am 6ft tall, athletic build, 13.5 stone. The missus is 5'3", slim and around 7.5 stone. Useage will be commuting most days (40 mile round trip, A-roads, B-roads and in town) on my own, plus pleasure riding on similar roads. However, I would also like to use the bike for trips up and down the A1 to see the inlaws, roughly 150 miles each way with the missus on the back. Finally, there may also be the possibility of some light touring round northern France - here the SV does have hard luggage available from the likes of Givi (and I will be getting the full lower fairings if it doesn't have them already if that aids protection from the elements) but the TT600 seems only to cater for soft luggage and less of it, but does come fully faired. Given the useage, running costs such as servicing and fuel economy are also important, so any indication of these would be good.




So, bearing all this in mind - which of the two bikes would you pick and why, or would you recommend something completely different?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
603 Posts
SV 'twin' has bags of low end grunt and then gets a tad asthmatic when revved harder.
TT 'four' is a little mild until you get it spinning at which point it really comes to life. Spin it harder and then it goes completely bonkers!

TT handling is superb and suspension is fully adjustable

Hard luggage option for the SV will be a real bonus for touring. I have the soft Triumph luggage on my bike which works well for my needs including occasional weekend trips up to Manchester.

Servicing on the TT is every 6K and alternates between a minor one and major one.

Best thing to do is ride 'em and see what you think.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,720 Posts
When I bought my first TT600 in January 2002, I made the same choice. For the same price, I could get the used 2001 TT600 that I bought or a new SV650. I was not a new rider, so that wasn't an issue. The things that swayed my opinion are brakes and suspension. The Triumph is worlds above the SV650 in both departments. Unless Suzuki has dramatically improved things, that will still be true, even though a used TT600 is a minimum of about 3 years old now. A TT600 is somewhat quicker than an SV650, but it is has less torque down low. I think a TT600 is more comfortable than an SV650, but that is my own peculiar shape. I also think that my 675 is pretty comfortable, so don't take my word for it. A small pillion would probably be reasonably happy on either bike, and both of them will have the same need for rowing through the gears while 2up. If you don't like shifting gears, then it is a consideration. But, if you don't like shifting gears, you shouldn't be looking at either of these bikes.

The Triumph build quality is somewhat higher than Suzuki, and Suzuki downgraded some internal engine components. That isn't really an issue unless you are racing the SV. If you plan on doing much track work, then an older round frame SV is a better option, since newer once have some crank problems. You won't have any of that with a TT600 until it gets a lot of mileage on it.

There you have my highly biased opinion. :razz:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,276 Posts
I was seriously trying to find a decent used SV when I found a TT available for a price I couldn't pass up. But then, I was looking for a track bike and had no concern for luggage or two-up riding. I suppose it depends on how much two-up riding you plan on doing - neither is gonna be overly comfortable for your passenger, but you'll appreciate that torque (yep, it's the magic of the twin) with the added weight.

I like the TT because it handles well and goes fast, and you don't see that many of 'em.

That said, if the prices and condition of the bikes were the same, I'd probably go for the SV if I were you for a couple of reasons (although I prefer the older less pointy ones with the round-tube frames).

[*] You give up some on the top end, but it's still plenty fast and handles great
[*] The torque will make a difference when riding two-up
[*] You have a HUGE amount of aftermarket parts available (the biggest bummer about the TT is the lack of options as far as aftermarket parts).

The test ride will make the decision, though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
If you're seriously thinking of two up riding and commuting, I'd have to say that the SV is a better choice. The low end grunt really helps when you've got the extra weight of a passenger. That low end power delivery and it's easy road manners make the SV a great commuter too.

I have the Speed four which is basically the TT without a fairing and it is not as well suited to in-town commuting or two up riding. The motor want's to lurch a bit at low speed and you're constantly shifting. The pegs are closer to the seat on the S4 which makes my legs feel a bit cramped on long rides, and I'm only 5'6". While I have the first gen nake SV, the pegs are in a more relaxed position. I've ridden the "S" version too and I didn't notice it feeling cramped.

The S4 has much better suspension, as others have mentioned, but SV is not all that bad. There is very little in the way of adjustment for the SV suspension, but SV riders usually have their suspension set up for their weight and leave it at that unless they're doing track days.

Build quality on the Triumph is better, but again, the SV is a close second. My SV is about four years old, I ride it in all types of weather and don't garage it - I just keep it covered. Even with that kind of treatment, the finish is holding up quite nicely. With a little cleaning it looks practically new. Mechanically, it's never had a problem and it starts up the first time every time. My S4 is brand new so I can't really say how well it will hold up over time.

If it weren't for the fact that you mention two up riding and daily commuting, I'd say go with the TT. My S4 is definitely a better bike in many ways. Just remember that the TT is a much more "performance" oriented bike. TheSV is a excellent all-rounder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
I was seriously considering an SV when I bought my Speed Four. I really wanted a twin, but the looks and British-built thing won me over in the end.

Just looking figures up in Bike magazine, I find this:

Speed Four (I'm assuming the TT600 is similar in performance) :
0-60 in 4.26s; insurance group 13; 88bhp; 41lb/ft; 34mpg; service every 4k.

SV650:
0-60 in 4.15s; insurance group 10; 70bhp; 45lb/ft; 47mpg; service every 3.5k

Just based on those figures, I'd be heading for the SV if I was you, since economy is a big thing - cheaper insurance and much better mpg, with similar performance to 60mph.

Having said that, I understand the SV may have some build quality issues and a cheaper feel ... but then it is cheaper, so it's fair enough.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
509 Posts
I too was looking at the SV when I bought the Speed four. I ride everyday through town, but I alos love long blasts and that includes dragging whoever im with at the time. Ive done 8 hours in the seat with a pillion and the triumph panniers and tank bag. I find that that if you are thinking about long rides with pillion a more upright seating position is better. This is why I was moving towards the SV or a fazer. But I really wanted the speed four because of the handling, the brakes and the fact that its a triumph. Then I saw a speed four with S3 handlebars and I realised I had everything I could want in a bike. Practical for long rides in seating position, handling to really enjoy the twisties and an engine that really opens up when you get out of town for a blast. It still turns heads, it still looks beautiful (well to me) its still something different and its been 100% reliable. I get bored very quickly, I now want another bike but the fact is, I cant think of anything that could replace it.
I know its an S4 and not a faired tt but with the extended flyscreen I find it gives me all the protection I need. hope any of that helps, you can pick up a brand new speed four for such a bargin its unreal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
907 Posts
I rode an SV650S for about 30 mins. that seat must be made of plywood
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
yeah, the stock seat is really bad. I put a Corbin on mine and it made a huge difference. Sargent also makes a seat for the SV which brings up another point - there are tons of after market items for the SV so if there is something about it you want to change, no problem.

Having said all, if you're really lusting after the TT, and who wouldn't, I'm sure you could make it work for your needs. Bottom line; get the bike you really want and all else will fall into place.
 
T

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
I'll say TT600 but that's because I have one and I love it.

My mate has a SV650 and I'm yet to have a shot of it (quite happy on mine ;)).

Anyway, was out with him breifly at the weekend and mentioned this thread, he said that you should drop by sv650.org (particually the forum) for their take on things!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Hi all,

I'm on sv650.org too so thanks for that! :)

Still cant decide on which but off to look at both this wknd.

How much should I be looking at paying for a 2000-model TT600 with 14k on the clock, from a Triumph Dealer? FSH etc, I assume its in good condition.

Also, is the 2000 model a desirable one or should I hold out for a later 2001/2 model?

Cheers!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
164 Posts
You would benefit in getting a later model. Earlier models had minor problems with the fuel injection. Each year after the TT's initial release, they updated the fuel mapping.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,720 Posts
I have exactly the opposite opinion! A 2000 with 14K on it is just a baby if it has been maintained properly. It had the hot cams and a black frame. If you find a 2002 or 2003, it has about as much power, but the frame is silver. That boils down to what you like. Fuel injection glitches can be tuned out, and there are quite a few maps around that make it behave very, very well. The only thing that the high performance maps do that isn't so good is foul the plugs if you don't wind out the engine periodically. But, if you don't wind out the engine periodically, you might as well not ride a TT600 anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Sorry, i'm confused! It is a black frame model so does this make it an early 2000 model, and one of the first bikes?

Is this a good thing or a bad thing? What is a hot cam? I know later TT's had not only a remap but also some internals work (AFAIK) so would a remap alone sort its low speed glitches out, and would this already be done? How can I tell if it has?

Oh, and how much would you pay for this bike from a Triumph Dealer?

Thanks! :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
164 Posts
Well I don't know about a dealer, but I just bought a 2003 TT600 with 2850 miles on it for $4300. It included a brand new helmet, joe rocket jacket, and 2 bike stands. The bike is in excellent condition.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,720 Posts
A 2000 bike has less bottom end torque than later bikes, but it has more top end horsepower. Some early 2001 spec bikes still had black frames and swingarms, but my 2001 was built in October 2000 and it had a silver frame and swingarm. I don't know when the changeover happened, but I do know that 2000 bikes only have black frames. You shouldn't have to worry much about lousy running, since most of those issues have been taken care of. If the bike has 14K miles on it, it hasn't been sitting in somebody's garage without the remaps. You can always get a TuneBoy cable and unlock code and put aftermarket maps in the ECU, or even the 2002 and later map that usually works better in all bikes. A lot of the poor running problems came from poorly synched throttle bodies or a too lean CO setting. Those are all known issues, and any dealer worth two pins will know about them and be able to deal with them. The other issue that plagued early bikes, mine included, was a faulty IAC valve. With 14K miles on the bike, that has probably been solved if it was ever a problem at all. Or, the previous owner spent 14K miles in complete misery! The only other issue that I can think of that is pretty typical is the speedo pickup magnet. That part is common to all Sagem injected Triumph models and it has a tendency to fall apart after a while. It may have already been replaced, but it is worth asking.

As a point of comparison, I sold the red and silver 2000 TT600 that I had for a while in March for $3,000. It had about 17K miles on it. It was in very good shape and had an aftermarket map in it, along with a Ventura rack. I don't think either of those things increased the price at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
164 Posts
On 2006-12-14 13:43, Will wrote:
As a point of comparison, I sold the red and silver 2000 TT600 that I had for a while in March for $3,000. It had about 17K miles on it.
I got a hell of a deal on mine then!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Thanks for the info.

I'm in the UK...so is a 2000 bike with 14k worth £1500, £2000, £2500, £3000? From a Triumph Dealer, remember.

Do you think I'd be better off waiting for a newer/lower mileage bike to come along? I'm not pressed for time to get a bike, and my budget is fairly flexible for the right bike too...?!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
131 Posts
Forget the TT600 and buy my SPEED FOUR

2003 53 plate with 7000 miles only, and yours for £2850 with loads of modifications. :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,969 Posts
Ring Webbs of Peterborough, they have a couple of TT600's in stock as well as a mint 06 Speed four, some Daytonas all at good prices, No I dont work there but was in yesterday getting a price for remap on the 955, loads of good bikes in stock and the time of year will give you some barganing power. By the way who the hell would buy a Suzuki over a Triumph, the finish is Cr)p ok in the Good old S Cal sunshine but not good in the UK's east midlands
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top